Blood News and Research RSS Feed - Blood News and Research

Treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes could be improved across all age groups

Treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes could be improved across all age groups

In a sweeping analysis assessing the current state of diabetes treatment in the U.S., T1D Exchange researchers conclude that there remains considerable room for improving treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes across all age groups, but especially for adolescents and young adults. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

MIT researchers have shown that they can use a microfluidic cell-squeezing device to introduce specific antigens inside the immune system's B cells, providing a new approach to developing and implementing antigen-presenting cell vaccines. [More]
Omeros receives EMA CHMP positive opinion for Omidria for cataract, IOL replacement surgery

Omeros receives EMA CHMP positive opinion for Omidria for cataract, IOL replacement surgery

Omeros Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering, developing and commercializing small-molecule and protein therapeutics for both large-market as well as orphan indications targeting inflammation, coagulopathies and disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the European Medicines Agency's (EMA's) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has adopted a positive opinion for Omidria® (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Sex-determining gene in mosquitoes may help reduce disease transmission

Sex-determining gene in mosquitoes may help reduce disease transmission

Researchers with the Fralin Life Science Institute at Virginia Tech have identified a gene responsible for sex determination in mosquitoes that can transmit yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya viruses. [More]
Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample. [More]
LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

Celiac disease-safe wheat, premature infant pain detection, and new medicines to fight flu and cancer are among the ideas to receive $2.9 million in funding from Washington's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF). [More]
GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

GHIT Fund expands investments in leishmaniasis, diagnostic tests

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, which in the last two years has funded almost $32 million for innovative tools to tackle global infectious diseases, today announced additional investments of nearly $11 million that bring its portfolio to approximately $43 million. [More]
Research: Some immune cells convert into cells that trigger disease

Research: Some immune cells convert into cells that trigger disease

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine have unraveled one of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work: That some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease. [More]
Heart rate measures could identify individuals with higher risk of diabetes

Heart rate measures could identify individuals with higher risk of diabetes

An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that heart rate measures could identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes, according to an international team of researchers. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Continuous glucose monitoring using real-time CGM helps better manage diabetes

Continuous glucose monitoring using real-time CGM helps better manage diabetes

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes can better control their HbA1c value with a combination of blood glucose self-monitoring (BGSM) and continuous interstitial glucose monitoring (CGM) using a real-time measurement device (real-time CGM) than with BGSM alone without severe or serious hypoglycaemia occurring more frequently. [More]
Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Researchers have designed a nanoparticle-based therapy that is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

In a report on what is believed to be the first small clinical trial of its kind, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have safely used immune cells grown from patients' own bone marrow to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer of white blood cells. [More]
COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is associated with increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease such as heart failure or a heart attack, as well as diseases not associated with the heart. However, COPD is not by itself associated with increased likelihood of having a stroke or a systemic embolism, according to a new research study. [More]
DF/BWCC introduces new website to provide information about precision cancer medicine

DF/BWCC introduces new website to provide information about precision cancer medicine

Precision cancer medicine - diagnosis and treatment based on the genetic abnormalities of a specific tumor - is playing an ever-larger role in cancer care. The field got a boost earlier this year when President Barack Obama proposed a $215 million federal Precision Medicine Initiative with cancer as one of its priorities. [More]
Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

A drug that could halt the progression of multiple sclerosis may soon be developed thanks to a discovery by a team at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The researchers have identified a molecule called MCAM, and they have shown that blocking this molecule could delay the onset of the disease and significantly slow its progression. [More]
Scientists reveal how lymphatic system develops in embryo

Scientists reveal how lymphatic system develops in embryo

For over one hundred years, scientists have debated the question of the origins of the lymphatic system - a parallel system to the blood vessels that serves as a conduit for everything from immune cells to fat molecules to cancer cells. This issue has now been resolved by Dr. Karina Yaniv of Weizmann Institute's Biological Regulation Department. In a study reported online today in Nature, she and her team revealed how the lymphatic system develops in the embryo and for the first time managed to grow lymphatic cells in the lab. [More]
Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Kidney function plays critical role in sepsis patients

Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement