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CEGIR launches patient contact registry for people with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases

CEGIR launches patient contact registry for people with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases

To coincide with Rare Disease Day 2015, the Consortium of Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease Researchers today launched a patient contact registry for individuals with eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGID), a group of rare diseases. [More]
Early intervention with GLP-1 analogues may delay onset of type 2 diabetes

Early intervention with GLP-1 analogues may delay onset of type 2 diabetes

GLP-1 is a hormone that regulates glucose levels in the body by stimulating the secretion of insulin, and GLP-1 also inhibits appetite. "We have found that GLP-1 is reduced by up to 25% among people with pre-diabetes and up to 20% among obese people compared to normal weight people. [More]
Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Findings reveal variations between countries and regions in use of HSCT procedure

Since the first experimental bone marrow transplant over 50 years ago, more than one million hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT) have been performed in 75 countries, according to new research charting the remarkable growth in the worldwide use of HSCT, published in The Lancet Haematology journal. [More]
Bionomics to present data from DisrupTOR-1 trial at ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium

Bionomics to present data from DisrupTOR-1 trial at ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium

Bionomics Limited is to present important additional data from the DisrupTOR-1 trial of BNC105 in patients with metastatic renal cancer at the ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando, Florida. The data will be presented by Dr. Sumanta Pal of the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in California in his poster presentation. [More]
Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugs in a clinical setting: the side effects included disorientation and hallucinations. [More]
Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

A study published recently in the IBD Journal found significant differences in hospital readmissions, medication usage, and both medical and surgical complications of children with Crohn's disease related to race. In the study, black children had a 1.5 times higher frequency of hospital readmissions because of Crohn's disease compared to white children. [More]
New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology being introduced at NYU Langone Medical Center could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities that show changes in low concentrations of specific proteins present following a neurological injury. [More]
FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company, and Medicines360, a nonprofit women's health pharmaceutical company, today announced the approval of LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to three years. [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection. [More]
Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Young women veterans referred for cardiac tests more likely to be depressed than men veterans

Women veterans who had specialized heart tests were younger and more likely to be obese, depressed and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than men veterans, according to a study published in an American Heart Association journal. [More]
Study shows efficacy of YONDELIS (trabectedin) in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

Study shows efficacy of YONDELIS (trabectedin) in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

PharmaMar announced that the European Journal of Cancer published online data from a large retrospective study with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients carried out at 25 French centers confirming that in routine practice YONDELIS (trabectedin) shows comparable or better clinical outcomes than those observed in clinical trials. [More]
UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

Current peanut allergy tests are not very reliable when it comes to diagnosing the severity of an individual's allergic reaction, which can range from hives to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. [More]
Study: Persistent insomnia increases mortality risk

Study: Persistent insomnia increases mortality risk

A connection between persistent insomnia and increased inflammation and mortality has been identified by a group of researchers from the University of Arizona. Their study, published in The American Journal of Medicine, found that people who suffer from persistent insomnia are at greater risk than those who experience intermittent insomnia. [More]
Pediatric patients who receive quick antibiotics for fever, neutropenia have reduced PICU needs

Pediatric patients who receive quick antibiotics for fever, neutropenia have reduced PICU needs

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer shows that pediatric cancer patients who receive antibiotics within 60 minutes of reporting fever and showing neutropenia (low neutrophil count), go on to have decreased intensive care consultation rate and lower mortality compared with patients who receive antibiotics outside the 60-minute window. [More]
LGTmedical issued U.S. patent for Kenek Core audio waveform technology

LGTmedical issued U.S. patent for Kenek Core audio waveform technology

LionsGate Technologies, Inc., a privately-held medical device company, announced today that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued a patent for its pulse oximetry technology based on the Kenek Core proprietary audio waveform platform. [More]
Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Study finds correlation between tests for hemoglobin A1c using finger stick and oral blood

Study finds correlation between tests for hemoglobin A1c using finger stick and oral blood

It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not a primary care provider, dental visits may be an opportune site for diabetes screening and monitoring glucose control for many at-risk patients. [More]
Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Boosting anti-cancer immunity through diet and novel drug therapies—that's the idea behind a collaborative project involving researchers from the South Dakota State University College of Pharmacy and Sanford Research in Sioux Falls. [More]
Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. [More]