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New Ebola variant identified in Guinea

New Ebola variant identified in Guinea

Performed in less than a month, sequencing of the complete genome and subsequent phylogenetic analysis show that the virus present in Guinea forms a clade (variant) that is distinct from strains previously identified in the Democratic Republic of Congo and in Gabon. Epidemiological investigations also linked the laboratory confirmed cases with the initial deaths recorded during the December 2013 outbreak. [More]
Oxygen-rich postnatal atmosphere results in cell cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes

Oxygen-rich postnatal atmosphere results in cell cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes

Scientific research at UT Southwestern Medical Center previously discovered that the newborn animal heart can heal itself completely, whereas the adult heart lacks this ability. New research by the same team today has revealed why the heart loses its incredible regenerative capability in adulthood, and the answer is quite simple - oxygen. [More]

Biomedical engineer develops highly innovative technology to make blood transfusions safer

A biomedical engineer at the University of Houston (UH) is working to develop highly innovative technology to make blood transfusions safer. His work is supported by a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [More]
Targeting B cells may help reduce disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis

Targeting B cells may help reduce disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis

A new study suggests that targeting B cells, which are a type of white blood cell in the immune system, may be associated with reduced disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Measuring tumors' oxygen levels could help doctors make decisions about treatments

Measuring tumors' oxygen levels could help doctors make decisions about treatments

Unlike healthy cells, cancer cells thrive when deprived of oxygen. Tumors in low-oxygen environments tend to be more resistant to therapy and spread more aggressively to other parts of the body. [More]
TSRI scientists discover new HIV target

TSRI scientists discover new HIV target

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) working with the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) has discovered a new vulnerable site on the HIV virus. The newly identified site can be attacked by human antibodies in a way that neutralizes the infectivity of a wide variety of HIV strains. [More]
Study offers evidence supporting use of autologous stem cell-based treatment for stroke

Study offers evidence supporting use of autologous stem cell-based treatment for stroke

People who have had a stroke, often suffer motor deficits with little potential to restore neurological function. [More]

New ultrasound device could help identify arterial plaque that cause heart attack, stroke

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a new ultrasound device that could help identify arterial plaque that is at high risk of breaking off and causing heart attack or stroke. [More]
Community-based structured weight loss program improves diabetes symptoms

Community-based structured weight loss program improves diabetes symptoms

Weight loss and control of blood sugar can reduce the risk of complications in patients with diabetes but this is difficult for many to achieve. A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine randomized controlled trial of obese adults with type 2 diabetes suggests that participants enrolled in a community-based structured weight loss program are able to shed more pounds, improve blood sugar control and reduce or eliminate insulin use and other medications compared to a control group. [More]

Reduced exposure to microbes triggers chronic inflammation

The greater prevalence of asthma, allergies and other chronic inflammatory disorders among people of lower socioeconomic status might be due in part to their reduced exposure to the microbes that thrive in rural environments, according to a new scientific paper. [More]
Heme iron consumption increases coronary heart disease risk by 57%

Heme iron consumption increases coronary heart disease risk by 57%

A new study from the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington has bolstered the link between red meat consumption and heart disease by finding a strong association between heme iron, found only in meat, and potentially deadly coronary heart disease. [More]

Iron consumption can increase risk for heart disease

A new study from the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington has bolstered the link between red meat consumption and heart disease by finding a strong association between heme iron, found only in meat, and potentially deadly coronary heart disease. [More]
Tolero Pharmaceuticals' Alvocidib gets Orphan Drug Designation for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Tolero Pharmaceuticals' Alvocidib gets Orphan Drug Designation for acute myeloid leukemia treatment

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug designation for Alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
NovaBay introduces new eye care product to help patients with eyelids irritation

NovaBay introduces new eye care product to help patients with eyelids irritation

NovaBay Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing topical non-antibiotic antimicrobial products, today announced that it is introducing a new eye care product, i-Lid Cleanser. [More]

Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the European Commission has granted an orphan drug designation (ODD) to Soliris (eculizumab), a first-in-class terminal complement inhibitor, for the prevention of graft rejection following solid organ transplantation. Graft rejection can cause severe injury to the transplanted organ and is a significant barrier to successful transplantation. [More]
91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, is celebrating National DNA Day by taking an in-depth look at what Americans know about their DNA and how genetics play a role in our everyday lives. The survey found that 91 percent of Americans know that their genetic information has important utility in managing their health. [More]
New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

A new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology. [More]

Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

New study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and National University Hospital Singapore suggests that a variant of a cell surface protein is an ideal target for developing drugs to treat gastric cancer [More]

Diaverum acquires its seventh kidney centre in Chile

Diaverum, one of the world's leading renal care service providers, has acquired its seventh kidney centre Chile. The Diaseal clinic, located in Puente Alto, a highly populated and fast growing district in the south of capital Santiago, features 18 stations which are used to treat 100 patients with haemodialysis (HD). [More]

Investigators use computer-assisted approach to identify and rank new clock genes

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. [More]