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Protein complex could play key role in natural development of stem cells into healthy blood cells

Protein complex could play key role in natural development of stem cells into healthy blood cells

A group of proteins best known for helping to activate all mammalian genes has been found to play a particularly commanding role in the natural development of specialized stem cells into healthy blood cells, a process known as hematopoiesis. [More]
Salk researchers develop new method to create unlimited numbers of precursor kidney cells

Salk researchers develop new method to create unlimited numbers of precursor kidney cells

Salk Institute scientists have discovered the holy grail of endless youthfulness--at least when it comes to one type of human kidney precursor cell. [More]
Serious heart problem can run in families and occur at similar ages, study suggests

Serious heart problem can run in families and occur at similar ages, study suggests

People with a family member who had an aortic dissection—a spontaneous tear in one of the body's main arteries—should take note of the age that family member was when the aortic dissection occurred. [More]
Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. [More]
People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the August 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model

Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model

Boosting levels of a specific protein in the brain alleviates hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease in a mouse model of the disorder, according to new research published online August 25, 2016 in Scientific Reports. [More]
Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms

Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms

A new study recently published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery questions whether patients with isolated moderate to severe mitral valve regurgitation should receive treatment in earlier stages instead of waiting until symptoms appear. [More]
Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule. [More]
Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

New research published in the UEG Journal1 has found that Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower response times than matched individuals that do not have the disease. [More]
Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Special RNA molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key controllers for maintaining immune health when fighting infection or preventing inflammatory disorders, according to research led by Jorge Henao-Mejia, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Dieting, exercise or combination of both equally effective in improving cardiovascular health

Dieting, exercise or combination of both equally effective in improving cardiovascular health

Which works better to improve the cardiovascular health of those who are overweight - dieting, exercise or a combination of both? A Saint Louis University study finds it doesn't matter which strategy you choose - it's the resulting weight loss that is the protective secret sauce. [More]
New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Assigning barcode to stem cells makes it possible to monitor large blood cell populations

Assigning barcode to stem cells makes it possible to monitor large blood cell populations

By assigning a barcode to stem cells, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made it possible to monitor large blood cell populations as well as individual blood cells, and study the changes over time. [More]
Study shows Latinos age more slowly at molecular level than other ethnic groups

Study shows Latinos age more slowly at molecular level than other ethnic groups

A new paper co-authored by a UC Santa Barbara researcher reveals that Latinos age at a slower rate than other ethnic groups. The findings, published in the current issue of Genome Biology, may one day help scientists understand how to slow the aging process for everyone. [More]
Interpace Diagnostics introduces new AccuCEA Insights for diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer

Interpace Diagnostics introduces new AccuCEA Insights for diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer

Interpace Diagnostics Group, a company that provides clinically useful molecular diagnostic tests and pathology services for evaluating risk of cancer by leveraging the latest technology in personalized medicine for better patient diagnosis and management, reported today that the Company has launched a new version of their AccuCEA™ product called "Insights" for Gastroenterologists who focus on diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer. [More]
New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

New research discovers how opposite-sex hormonal therapy influences the brain

Women and men often show marked differences as regards mental illnesses. In order to learn more about this phenomenon, a project supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF explored how opposite-sex hormonal therapy applied to transgender individuals influences the brain. [More]
European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

A group of European scientists have invented a microscope that will allow the fastest ever detection of life-threatening infections caused by bacteria, such as E. coli or Staphylococcus, and conditions such as Meningitis, saving millions of lives every year. [More]
AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

AgriLife scientists examine role of ghrelin receptor in age-related adipose tissue inflammation in mice

Scientists have proposed that inflammation is the harbinger of aging and central to the aging process, a phenomenon described as 'inflamm-aging,' said Dr. Yuxiang Sun. [More]
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