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Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

The number of cases of childhood diarrhoea attributable to pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses or other infections) have been substantially underestimated and may be nearly twice as high as previous analysis suggests, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

An antibody drug that targets a surface marker on cancer stem cells could offer a promising new therapeutic approach for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of blood cancer that affects an estimated 50,000 people in Saudi Arabia. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
Radiometer to sponsor 2016 EuSEM Congress in Vienna, Austria

Radiometer to sponsor 2016 EuSEM Congress in Vienna, Austria

Radiometer is proud to be a gold sponsor of this year’s European Congress on Emergency Medicine organized by the European Society for Emergency Medicine (EuSEM) in Vienna, Austria, October 1-5. [More]
Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Many know Botox as a trendy way to get rid of wrinkles, but the popular drug — made from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) — can do more than just fill lines. [More]
Identical twins experience unimaginable cancer

Identical twins experience unimaginable cancer

Since the day they came home from the hospital in matching newborn monkey outfits, Zane and Zac Taylor have done everything together. [More]
Gene editing of hematopoietic stem cells can cure many hereditary and congenital diseases

Gene editing of hematopoietic stem cells can cure many hereditary and congenital diseases

Recent advances in gene editing technology, which allows for targeted repair of disease-causing mutations, can be applied to hematopoietic stem cells with the potential to cure a variety of hereditary and congenital diseases. [More]
Scientists manage to produce first molecular map of genes in the pancreas

Scientists manage to produce first molecular map of genes in the pancreas

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
ASHG and Mayo Clinic collaborate to facilitate genetic and genomic education

ASHG and Mayo Clinic collaborate to facilitate genetic and genomic education

The American Society of Human Genetics and Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine announced today a formal collaboration under which the two organizations will facilitate the use of genomics in medicine through the education of health professionals. [More]
Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Mercury is a potent neurotoxin present in our daily lives and our body can accumulate it over the years. Food consumption, such as fish and rice, is the most common source of mercury exposure. [More]
Magnetic bacteria can be promising vehicle for efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs

Magnetic bacteria can be promising vehicle for efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs

Researchers funded in part by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have recently shown that magnetic bacteria are a promising vehicle for more efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs. They reported their results in the August 2016 issue of Nature Nanotechnology. [More]
Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat, according to researchers, including a Texas A&M University professor and his former doctoral student. [More]
Cesarean-section leaves women more vulnerable to VTE than vaginal delivery

Cesarean-section leaves women more vulnerable to VTE than vaginal delivery

Roughly one-third of all births in Europe and North America now occur via cesarean section (CS). Following any birth, women are at an increased risk for a venous thromboembolism (VTE), but it's believed that CS leaves women more vulnerable to VTE, blood clots, than vaginal delivery (VD). [More]
CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

Cystinosis is a rare disease that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. [More]
Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

The heart cannot regenerate muscle tissue after a heart attack has killed part of the muscle wall, and that dead tissue can strain surrounding muscle, leading to a lethal heart enlargement. [More]
Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

A new type of immunotherapy shows promise against cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that recur after treatment or that never respond to therapy in the first place. [More]
MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

MSU experts pioneer pathways to new treatment options for pneumonia

Streptococcus pneumoniae likely is not a term immediately recognizable by most individuals, even if they have had unpleasant run-ins with the common bacterium. However, experts at Mississippi State University are pioneering pathways to new treatment options. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
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