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Portable breath sensor to detect lifestyle diseases? An interview with Osamu Tsuboi, Fujitsu Laboratories

Portable breath sensor to detect lifestyle diseases? An interview with Osamu Tsuboi, Fujitsu Laboratories

Generally, it is thought that there is a connection between concentrations of ammonia and liver disease, such as fatty liver and cirrhosis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, and kidney failure. [More]
Global study finds weight loss could be key for tackling pre-diabetes

Global study finds weight loss could be key for tackling pre-diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes is the world’s fastest growing chronic disease and is linked to the increasing number of overweight people. One in 16 people (3.9 million) in the UK are thought to have diabetes, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. [More]
Children with strong family history of type 2 diabetes or CVD prone to have high cholesterol levels

Children with strong family history of type 2 diabetes or CVD prone to have high cholesterol levels

A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes shows that children with a strong family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or type 2 diabetes were found to have cholesterol levels significantly higher than children with no family history of those conditions. [More]
Oncologists combine two different types of immunotherapy to successfully treat metastatic melanoma

Oncologists combine two different types of immunotherapy to successfully treat metastatic melanoma

Oncologists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have successfully treated a patient with metastatic melanoma by combining two different types of immunotherapy. Cassian Yee and colleagues describe their approach in a paper, "Combined IL-21-primed polyclonal CTL plus CTLA4 blockade controls refractory metastatic melanoma in a patient," that will be published online May 30 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

There are more well-founded therapy options for the treatment of strokes than ever before. Care has to be reorganised before these innovations are actually used on patients. At the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen, experts are discussing just how to do that successfully - from guidelines for the use of thrombectomy procedures all the way to the structure and expansion of stroke care units. [More]
New study sheds light on link between gut microbiome and the brain

New study sheds light on link between gut microbiome and the brain

Intestinal bacteria that can boost bravery or trigger multiple sclerosis: An increasing body of research results confirms the importance of the "gut-brain axis" for neurology and indicates that the triggers for a number of neurological diseases may be located in the digestive tract. [More]
UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

About 800,000 strokes occur in America each year; that's about one every 40 seconds. Houston resident Joe Carrabba experienced one of them. [More]
SIPPET study may have implications for treatment of patients with severe hemophilia A

SIPPET study may have implications for treatment of patients with severe hemophilia A

SIPPET, a study which involved 42 centers in 14 countries in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia was designed to definitively settle the long-debated question whether factor VIII concentrates from different sources (plasma-derived containing VWF or recombinant technology) differ in risk of inhibitor development in previously untreated children (PUPs) with severe hemophilia A. [More]
Slime mold provides key to understanding directional ability of immune cells

Slime mold provides key to understanding directional ability of immune cells

How white blood cells in our immune systems home in on and engulf bacterial invaders--like humans following the scent of oven-fresh pizza--has long been a mystery to scientists. [More]
Inadequate monitoring places post-operative patients at risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression

Inadequate monitoring places post-operative patients at risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression

Nearly 75 percent of hospitalized patients receiving opioids for pain management are not monitored according to hospital guidelines. [More]
Researchers demonstrate decisive role of cholesterol in T cell activation

Researchers demonstrate decisive role of cholesterol in T cell activation

T cell receptors are an important part of the human immune system. They are able to switch their conformation from an inactive to an active state spontaneously without any antigens present. [More]
Overcoming barriers to move beyond race-based treatment decisions

Overcoming barriers to move beyond race-based treatment decisions

Prescribing certain medications on the basis of a patient's race has long come under fire from those uneasy with using race as a surrogate for biology when treating disease. [More]
NASA releases new video that highlights Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites

NASA releases new video that highlights Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites

NASA's Human Research Program is releasing "Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat" video to highlight its Twins Study which uses omics to study Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites. [More]

Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

The crisis of lead-contaminated drinking water in Flint, Mich., continues to make headlines—but it's just the most prominent example of an "ongoing and needless tragedy of childhood lead poisoning," according David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH, a noted authority on childhood lead poisoning prevention. [More]
Combining VCA with organ transplants improves patient outcomes

Combining VCA with organ transplants improves patient outcomes

Simultaneous transplantation of a "composite" skull and scalp flap plus a kidney and pancreas—all from the same donor—provided excellent outcomes for a patient with a non-healing scalp defect and declining organ kidney and pancreas function, according to a report in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Delegates at the World Health Assembly have agreed resolutions and decisions on air pollution, chemicals, the health workforce, childhood obesity, violence, noncommunicable diseases, and the election of the next Director-General. [More]
Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Testing cancers for 'addiction' to a gene that boosts cell growth can pick out patients who may respond to a targeted drug under development, a major new study reports. [More]
NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

A naturally occurring vitamin, nicotinamide riboside (NR), can lower blood sugar levels, reduce fatty liver, and prevent peripheral nerve damage in mouse models of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Health Care System. [More]
Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

At noon every day, levels of genes and proteins throughout your body are drastically different than they are at midnight. Disruptions to this 24-hour cycle of physiological activity are why jet lag or a bad night's sleep can alter your appetite and sleep patterns for days--and even contribute to conditions like heart disease, sleep disorders and cancers. [More]
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