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Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
Endovascular therapy best treatment option for stroke patients

Endovascular therapy best treatment option for stroke patients

A research paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) today confirms earlier findings that a procedure called endovascular therapy (ET) for ischemic stroke is the best treatment option for many patients by reducing the incidents of disability. [More]
Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability in the United States, and less than 40 percent of patients who experience the most severe form of stroke regain functional independence if they receive the standard drug intervention alone. [More]
Many Medicare patients undergo unnecessary routine preoperative tests before cataract surgery

Many Medicare patients undergo unnecessary routine preoperative tests before cataract surgery

More than half of all Medicare patients who have cataract surgery undergo unnecessary routine preoperative testing, despite strong evidence that these tests are usually not beneficial and increase national health care costs, reports a study published on April 16 in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease. [More]
Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

Study could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating Huntington's disease

An international study led by researchers from Université Laval and CHU de Québec-Université Laval has identified significant vascular changes in the brains of people with Huntington's disease. This breakthrough, the details of which are published in the most recent issue of Annals of Neurology, will have significant implications for our understanding of the disease and could open the door to new therapeutic targets for treating this fatal neurodegenerative condition. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
Electronic micropump combined with anticonvulsant drug may treat brain diseases

Electronic micropump combined with anticonvulsant drug may treat brain diseases

Many potentially efficient drugs have been created to treat neurological disorders, but they cannot be used in practice. Typically, for a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. [More]
Baxter submits BAX 855 NDA to Japan's MHLW for treatment of hemophilia A patients

Baxter submits BAX 855 NDA to Japan's MHLW for treatment of hemophilia A patients

Nektar Therapeutics reported today that partner Baxter International Inc. announced that the company has submitted a new drug application (NDA) to Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the approval of BAX 855, an investigational, extended half-life recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) treatment based on ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)] for patients over 12 years of age with hemophilia A. [More]
HeartWare Ventricular Assist System meets primary endpoint in ENDURANCE clinical trial

HeartWare Ventricular Assist System meets primary endpoint in ENDURANCE clinical trial

HeartWare International, Inc., a leading innovator of less invasive, miniaturized circulatory support technologies that are revolutionizing the treatment of advanced heart failure, today announced that data from its first destination therapy clinical trial cohort, ENDURANCE, successfully demonstrated that the trial achieved the primary endpoint. [More]
New research links sleep apnea, heavy snoring with premature cognitive decline

New research links sleep apnea, heavy snoring with premature cognitive decline

Heavy snoring and sleep apnea may be linked to memory and thinking decline at an earlier age, according to a new study published in the April 15, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Medtronic plans to develop stent graft system for treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms

Medtronic plans to develop stent graft system for treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms

The global leader in medical technology for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR), Medtronic plc today announced that it plans to develop a stent graft system for less invasive treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms under an exclusive patent license agreement with South Dakota-based Sanford Health. [More]
High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

You might think that you can get away with eating fatty foods for a few days without it making any significant changes to your body. Think again. After just five days of eating a high-fat diet, the way in which the body's muscle processes nutrients changes, which could lead to long-term problems such as weight gain, obesity, and other health issues, a new study has found. [More]
New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

Why do smokers have a five to ten times greater risk of developing alcohol dependence than nonsmokers? Do smokers have a greater tendency toward addiction in general or does nicotine somehow reinforce alcohol consumption? Now, a study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute helps provide insight into these questions, showing that, in rat models, nicotine exposure actually promotes alcohol dependence. [More]
Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Health apps have the potential to make a broad impact on the health of the general population, argues one expert in The BMJ this week. But another explains that there is not enough evidence to support such claims and suggests that health apps may even be harmful. [More]
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