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VolitionRx initiates study to assess NuQ blood tests for detection of prostate cancer

VolitionRx initiates study to assess NuQ blood tests for detection of prostate cancer

VolitionRx Limited today announced that it has initiated a study to assess the feasibility of using the Company’s NuQ blood tests to detect prostate cancer. The study is in collaboration with the Surrey Cancer Research Institute of the University of Surrey in the UK. [More]
Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found that significant bone loss - a side effect of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - occurs during the first month of treatment, far earlier than previously assumed. Results of the study will be available online February 4, in advance of publication in the journal Bone. [More]
New method could help scientists conduct in-depth research on malignant tumors in cancer patients

New method could help scientists conduct in-depth research on malignant tumors in cancer patients

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have pioneered a new method for conducting in-depth research on malignant tumors in patients, in the process discovering new complexities underlying cancer biology and overturning a nearly century-old perception about cancer metabolism. [More]
Study provides window into the brain changes that link mindfulness meditation with health-related benefits

Study provides window into the brain changes that link mindfulness meditation with health-related benefits

Over the past decade, mindfulness meditation has been shown to improve a broad range of health and disease outcomes, such as slowing HIV progression and improving healthy aging. Yet, little is known about the brain changes that produce these beneficial health effects. [More]
Growing up poor promotes eating in the absence of hunger in adulthood

Growing up poor promotes eating in the absence of hunger in adulthood

How much you eat when you're not really hungry may depend on how well off your family was when you were a child, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
NIH researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for vibratory urticaria

NIH researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for vibratory urticaria

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation responsible for a rare form of inherited hives induced by vibration, also known as vibratory urticaria. Running, hand clapping, towel drying or even taking a bumpy bus ride can cause temporary skin rashes in people with this rare disorder. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
AstraZeneca’s TAGRISSO (osimertinib) approved in EU for metastatic EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC

AstraZeneca’s TAGRISSO (osimertinib) approved in EU for metastatic EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC

AstraZeneca today announced that the European Commission (EC) has granted conditional marketing authorisation for TAGRISSO™ (AZD9291, osimertinib) 80mg once-daily tablets for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) T790M mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
Cell Therapy Catapult becomes Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult

Cell Therapy Catapult becomes Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult

The Cell Therapy Catapult, the UK organisation dedicated to the growth of the UK cell and gene therapy industry by bridging the gap between scientific research and commercialisation, today announces the official change of its name to the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult. [More]
New biosensor test system developed for accurate measurements of protein molecule concentration in blood

New biosensor test system developed for accurate measurements of protein molecule concentration in blood

Researchers from the General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a new biosensor test system based on magnetic nanoparticles. [More]
Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Text messages can double the odds of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease. That is the central finding of a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
One million people across England, North Wales now registered to book blood donation appointments online

One million people across England, North Wales now registered to book blood donation appointments online

One million people across England and North Wales are now registered to book donation appointments online, making it one of the largest digital booking systems of any blood service in the world. [More]
New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

For the first time, researchers have shown that an enzyme key to regulating gene expression -- and also an oncogene when mutated -- is critical for the expression of numerous inflammatory compounds that have been implicated in age-related increases in cancer and tissue degeneration, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Scientists explore how antidepressants affect fetuses during pregnancy

Scientists explore how antidepressants affect fetuses during pregnancy

Depression is a serious issue for expecting mothers. Left untreated, depression could have implications for a fetus's health. But treating the disease during pregnancy may carry health risks for the developing fetus, which makes an expecting mother's decision whether to take medication a very difficult one. [More]
Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

A research project headed by Henrik Kloeverpris, a postdoc at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, shows that the so-called ILCs (innate lymphoid cells) - a component of the immune system crucial to maintaining immune system balance - are destroyed in patients infected with HIV. [More]
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]
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