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Intranasal vaccine may provide long-term protection against multiple flu strains

Intranasal vaccine may provide long-term protection against multiple flu strains

Intranasal flu vaccines may be able to provide long-lasting protection against pandemic flu strains, according to a new study from immunologists at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Two Ebola vaccine candidates show promise in clinical trial

Two Ebola vaccine candidates show promise in clinical trial

An immunization regimen using two Ebola vaccine candidates was safe and well-tolerated and induced an immune response in healthy adult volunteers in a Phase 1 clinical trial. [More]
Common viruses could produce mild to lethal cardiac injury

Common viruses could produce mild to lethal cardiac injury

A review article has been published in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Design which provides an overview of therecent literature discussing the different clinical forms of heart disease resulting from virus infections including the prognosis, and current therapies. [More]
Boosting the body's natural defences to stop RSV infection

Boosting the body's natural defences to stop RSV infection

Babies at risk of a serious lung infection could be helped by a therapy based on the body's natural immune defences. [More]
Researchers solve structure of key protein in coronaviruses, like MERS and SARS

Researchers solve structure of key protein in coronaviruses, like MERS and SARS

When the respiratory illness SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) emerged in 2003, it killed at least 775 people before it was contained. Nine years later, MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) began circulating in the human population—and has gone on to have a 36 percent case fatality rate. [More]
Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Researchers at Duke Health are fine-tuning a test that can determine whether a respiratory illness is caused by infection from a virus or bacteria so that antibiotics can be more precisely prescribed. [More]
Luminex's NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel obtains FDA clearance

Luminex's NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel obtains FDA clearance

Luminex Corporation today announced that it has received FDA clearance for its NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel that detects 20 clinically relevant viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens, including the atypical bacteria Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumonia. [More]
Simple approach to predict viral evolution may improve vaccine efficacy

Simple approach to predict viral evolution may improve vaccine efficacy

New results from a study performed at the University of Helsinki suggest that genomic information from circulating influenza viruses can help in producing more efficient seasonal vaccines. The researchers were able to develop a simple approach for reliable real-time tracking and prediction of viral evolution based on whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses. [More]
Seqirus announces FDA approval of Fluad for seasonal influenza

Seqirus announces FDA approval of Fluad for seasonal influenza

Seqirus announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Fluad (Influenza Vaccine, Adjuvanted) to help protect those aged 65 years and older against seasonal influenza. Fluad is the first adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine approved in the United States; it was specifically developed for the adult population aged 65 and older. [More]
New data shows ALS-008176 drug safe and effective against RSV infection

New data shows ALS-008176 drug safe and effective against RSV infection

Alios BioPharma, Inc., part of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies announced that the New England Journal of Medicine will publish findings from a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) challenge study for ALS-008176, a cytidine nucleoside analog with activity against RSV. [More]
New vaccine candidate shows great promise at fighting respiratory syncytial virus

New vaccine candidate shows great promise at fighting respiratory syncytial virus

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say a new candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) made with a weakened version of the virus shows great promise at fighting the disease, the leading cause of hospitalization for children under the age of one in the U.S. [More]
Johns Hopkins doctors urge people to get vaccinated against influenza virus

Johns Hopkins doctors urge people to get vaccinated against influenza virus

Flu season is upon us again — and yes, you should get the flu vaccine. Doctors at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine say everyone 6 months of age and older should get vaccinated against the influenza virus this year. [More]
New studies raise important questions about impact of statin therapy on effectiveness of flu vaccines

New studies raise important questions about impact of statin therapy on effectiveness of flu vaccines

A new pair of studies suggests that statins, drugs widely used to reduce cholesterol, may have a detrimental effect on the immune response to influenza vaccine and the vaccine's effectiveness at preventing serious illness in older adults. Published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, the findings, if confirmed by additional research, may have implications for flu vaccine recommendations, guidelines for statin use around the time of vaccination, and future vaccine clinical trials in seniors. [More]
Luminex's NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel receives CE-IVD marking

Luminex's NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel receives CE-IVD marking

Luminex Corporation today announced that it has received CE-IVD marking for its NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel. The Panel detects 21 clinically-relevant viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens, including the atypical bacteria Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila. [More]
Study: Influenza vaccines offer sustained protection up to 6 months during flu season

Study: Influenza vaccines offer sustained protection up to 6 months during flu season

Individuals who received the flu vaccine were protected for up to 6 months post-vaccination, the duration of most flu seasons, according to a study presented at the 2015 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
Children increase parents’ risk for viral infection

Children increase parents’ risk for viral infection

The BIG LoVE (Utah Better Identification of Germs-Longitudinal Viral Epidemiology) study, led by scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine, finds that each bundle of joy puts the entire household at increased risk for infection with viruses that cause colds, flu, and other respiratory illnesses. [More]
Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

A vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles, or microscopic, genetically engineered particles, is an effective treatment for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Researchers develop diagnostic test to detect enterovirus D68

Researchers develop diagnostic test to detect enterovirus D68

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year. The outbreak caused infections at an unprecedented rate, with over 1,000 confirmed cases and 14 reported deaths nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

From 2004 to 2010 in Texas, mental illness was the most common reason for the hospitalization of children ages 10-14 while pregnancy/birth was the most common reason for the hospitalization of adolescents ages 15-17, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
Purdue University-led study could lead to better treatments for people infected with MERS virus

Purdue University-led study could lead to better treatments for people infected with MERS virus

A Purdue University-led team of researchers studying the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have found molecules that shut down the activity of an essential enzyme in the virus and could lead the way to better treatments for those infected. [More]
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