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Pitt researchers awarded $11.8 million NIH grant to explore genetic roots of cleft lip, palate

Pitt researchers awarded $11.8 million NIH grant to explore genetic roots of cleft lip, palate

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine have been awarded a $11.8 million, five-year grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, to continue their exploration of the genetic roots of cleft lip and cleft palate and to expand the effort to include populations in Colombia, Nigeria, the Philippines and Pennsylvania. [More]
Gut microbe in patients may tip doctors about SCID

Gut microbe in patients may tip doctors about SCID

Many people recognize "the bubble boy" as an unusual character from a "Seinfeld" episode or a John Travolta movie. [More]
Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec's Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds. [More]
Novel imaging technique could revolutionise diagnosis of neuroblastoma

Novel imaging technique could revolutionise diagnosis of neuroblastoma

CANCER RESEARCH UK's Centre for Drug Development, in collaboration with the Rising Tide Foundation, a Swiss-based non-profit organisation which funds innovative cancer trials, today (TUESDAY) announce a new trial at The Royal Marsden and University College London that could revolutionise how children with one of the deadliest forms of cancer are diagnosed. [More]
Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Repeated exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in the first two years of life is associated with early childhood obesity, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a retrospective study based on data from electronic health records from the extensive CHOP Care Network. [More]
New OSU study shows association between gas kitchen stove ventilation and asthma

New OSU study shows association between gas kitchen stove ventilation and asthma

Parents with children at home should use ventilation when cooking with a gas stove, researchers from Oregon State University are recommending, after a new study showed an association between gas kitchen stove ventilation and asthma, asthma symptoms and chronic bronchitis. [More]
Curemark Founder to get Northstar Award for breakthrough autism research

Curemark Founder to get Northstar Award for breakthrough autism research

Curemark, a leading drug research and development company focused on the treatment of neurological and other diseases, is proud to announce that Dr. Joan Fallon, Founder and CEO, will receive Springboard Enterprises' Northstar Award, as recognition for her entrepreneurial leadership and achievements in autism research. [More]
Report: Too few staff to care for children admitted to intensive care units

Report: Too few staff to care for children admitted to intensive care units

More children than ever are being admitted to intensive care units in England and Wales but there are fewer staff per bed available to cope with the increase, according to a new report published jointly by the University of Leeds and University of Leicester. [More]
Autistic children more sedentary than typically-developing peers

Autistic children more sedentary than typically-developing peers

A new Oregon State University study of children with autism found that they are more sedentary than their typically-developing peers, averaging 50 minutes less a day of moderate physical activity and 70 minutes more each day sitting. [More]
Chemotherapy, radiotherapy have no negative effect on unborn babies

Chemotherapy, radiotherapy have no negative effect on unborn babies

Children who are exposed to chemotherapy or radiotherapy while in the womb suffer no negative impacts on mental or cardiac development, international studies presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid have shown. [More]

US children with cystic fibrosis have better lung function compared to UK counterparts

There are significant differences in the lung function of children and young adults in the United States (US) who have cystic fibrosis compared with those in the United Kingdom (UK). [More]
UCLA research may lead to novel treatment for PH1

UCLA research may lead to novel treatment for PH1

Research by UCLA biochemists may lead to a new treatment - or even a cure - for PH1, a rare and potentially deadly genetic kidney disease that afflicts children. Their findings also may provide important insights into treatments for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative diseases. [More]
New comic book explains to children about Primary Immunodeficiency

New comic book explains to children about Primary Immunodeficiency

Primary Immunodeficiency (PID) refers to a group of disorders characterised by limited or absent function of the immune system. The majority of PIDs are inherited defects meaning that a component is either missing or does not function normally, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection. About 1 in 500 people are born with PID and doctors’ estimate that approximately 5,000 people may be affected by PID in the UK. [More]
Fingerprint-based recognition method could increase immunization coverage, save lives of infants

Fingerprint-based recognition method could increase immunization coverage, save lives of infants

Each year 2.5 million children die worldwide because they do not receive life-saving vaccinations at the appropriate time. [More]

Innovative program aims to tackle health barriers for underprivileged children

Many children in inner-city schools who have long faced economic hardships also struggle with chronic health conditions that further impair their ability to learn and break free from a cycle of poverty. To address this, the H&M Conscious Foundation announced today that it is investing $1.3 million to support an innovative school-based program in New York designed to tackle health barriers that get in the way of learning for underprivileged children. [More]
CHLA achieves Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute designation

CHLA achieves Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute designation

Children's Hospital Los Angeles was honored by The Healthcare Colloquium as the first west coast pediatric hospital to achieve designation as an Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute. [More]
International researchers identify novel causes for severe childhood epilepsies

International researchers identify novel causes for severe childhood epilepsies

In the largest collaborative study so far, an international team of researchers, including scientists from VIB and Antwerp University identified novel causes for severe childhood epilepsies. [More]
Women better informed about prenatal genetic testing choose fewer tests

Women better informed about prenatal genetic testing choose fewer tests

A clinical trial led by UC San Francisco has found that when pregnant women are educated about their choices on prenatal genetic testing, the number of tests actually drops, even when the tests are offered with no out-of-pocket costs. [More]
Children conceived after interval of 5 or more years at increased risk of autism

Children conceived after interval of 5 or more years at increased risk of autism

A study published in the MONTH 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that children who were conceived either less than 1 year or more than 5 years after the birth of their prior sibling were more likely to be diagnosed with autism than children conceived following an interval of 2-5 years. [More]
Innovative partnership provides effective intervention program for substance-exposed babies, toddlers

Innovative partnership provides effective intervention program for substance-exposed babies, toddlers

Two decades after its initiation, the University of Miami Linda Ray Intervention Program for substance-exposed babies and toddlers demonstrates long-term success. [More]