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Research reveals that unplanned births out-of-hospital linked with higher infant mortality

Research reveals that unplanned births out-of-hospital linked with higher infant mortality

New research reveals that unplanned births out-of-hospital in Norway are associated with higher infant mortality. [More]
Organizations across U.S. participating in Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness campaign

Organizations across U.S. participating in Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness campaign

Organizations in Atlanta – and across the country – are participating in the Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness campaign this September. Coordinating this effort is the Aflac Cancer Center of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta along with the Stop Childhood Cancer Alliance that was created to be the driving force in increasing awareness of childhood cancer and enhancing support for the young people fighting this disease, as well as the clinicians and researchers helping them. [More]
Neuropsychologist sees increase in ADHD diagnoses

Neuropsychologist sees increase in ADHD diagnoses

Since 2007, there has been a 16 percent increase in ADHD diagnoses in the United States. While this may alarm some parents, Kids In The House experts explain what this increase really means and how parents can help children who have been diagnosed with ADHD. [More]
Mechanical ventilation is key indicators of reduced mathematical ability in preterm kids

Mechanical ventilation is key indicators of reduced mathematical ability in preterm kids

A new study, led by researchers at the University of Warwick in the UK and the Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany, and just published in the Journal Early Human Development, has found that both the length of time spent in hospital after birth and the use of mechanical ventilation are key indicators of reduced mathematical ability in preterm children. [More]
Risk of obesity higher among adults who had been subjected to abuse as children

Risk of obesity higher among adults who had been subjected to abuse as children

Being subjected to abuse during childhood entails a markedly increased risk of developing obesity as an adult. [More]
New blood test provides fast, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis in children

New blood test provides fast, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis in children

A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test (TAM-TB assay) is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. [More]
Researchers receive encouraging results from two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials

Researchers receive encouraging results from two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials

Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was previously unrecognized in the infants studied in the 1990s. [More]
Childhood burns victims experience higher rates of depression, suicidal thoughts

Childhood burns victims experience higher rates of depression, suicidal thoughts

Adults who have been hospitalized for a burn as a child experience higher than usual rates of depression and suicidal thoughts, according to new research at the University of Adelaide. [More]
CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

The Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation program at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been honored for the third time with the prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization, an international group of health care professionals and scientists who evaluate hospital treatment therapies for patients fighting complex cardiac disease and respiratory failure. [More]
High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

The recently published National Immunization Survey (NIS) conducted by the CDC, shows that the majority of infants in the US were vaccinated against potentially serious diseases in 2013. Fewer than 1% of children were unvaccinated in 2013. [More]
New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus

New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus

The New England Journal of Medicine published research results on Aug. 21 from a clinical trial of a drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). [More]
School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98 percent of the 50,000,000 students in U.S. public schools, grades k-12, and are uniquely positioned to facilitate the early diagnosis of serious medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency (PI). [More]

Parents’ response to infant's babbling can speed child's language development

Pay attention, mom and dad, especially when your infant looks at you and babbles. Parents may not understand a baby's prattling, but by listening and responding, they let their infants know they can communicate which leads to children forming complex sounds and using language more quickly. [More]
Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Nocturnal awakenings are frequent among 6-month-old children, but sharing bed might make things worse. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center redesignated as Level III Perinatal Center

Loyola University Medical Center redesignated as Level III Perinatal Center

Loyola University Medical Center has been redesignated as a Level III Perinatal Center by the Illinois Department of Public Health. [More]
UW researchers develop smartphone app that detects newborn jaundice within minutes

UW researchers develop smartphone app that detects newborn jaundice within minutes

University of Washington engineers and physicians have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns and can deliver results to parents and pediatricians within minutes. It could serve as a screening tool to determine whether a baby needs a blood test - the gold standard for detecting high levels of bilirubin. [More]
EPO administered to preterm infants linked with reduced risk of brain injury

EPO administered to preterm infants linked with reduced risk of brain injury

High-dose erythropoietin (EPO; a hormone) administered within 42 hours of birth to preterm infants was associated with a reduced risk of brain injury, as indicated by magnetic resonance imaging, according to a study in the August 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

An international research team reports in Nature Medicine a novel molecular pathway that causes an aggressive form of medulloblastoma, and suggests repurposing an anti-depressant medication to target the new pathway may help combat one of the most common brain cancers in children. [More]
Intervention program to help parents manage children's behaviors after being diagnosed with autism

Intervention program to help parents manage children's behaviors after being diagnosed with autism

In a first of its kind clinical trial, Debra Zand, Ph.D., and her team at Saint Louis University, will run an intervention program to help parents address and manage their children's challenging behaviors immediately after being diagnosed with autism. [More]
UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry will study the transmission of a bacteria that up to 40 percent of healthy women carry, which becomes deadly when passed on to infants during birth. [More]