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Study emphasizes the importance of transparency in health communication for childhood vaccination

Study emphasizes the importance of transparency in health communication for childhood vaccination

A new study by Dr. Anat Gesser-Edelsburg, Dr. Yaffa Shir-Raz and Prof. Manfred S. Green from University of Haifa, School of Public Health, published in the Journal of Risk Research suggests that even parents who are not "vaccine refusers" and who usually comply with the routine vaccination programs may hesitate or refuse to vaccinate their children based on poor communication from the relevant healthcare provider, as well as concerns about the safety of the vaccine. [More]
Novo Nordisk gets positive CHMP opinion for expanded use of Tresiba in children with diabetes

Novo Nordisk gets positive CHMP opinion for expanded use of Tresiba in children with diabetes

Novo Nordisk today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has issued a positive opinion for expanded use of Tresiba® (insulin degludec) in children and adolescents aged one to 17 years with diabetes. [More]
School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits. A new analysis of Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard shows an association between being exposed to the intervention as a parent and a modest decrease in body mass index (BMI) compared to parents in two similar control communities. [More]
Oral budesonide suspension offers hope for pediatric patients with EoE

Oral budesonide suspension offers hope for pediatric patients with EoE

A new formulation of oral budesonide suspension, a steroid-based treatment, is safe and effective in treating pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Healthcare providers can help parents understand sleep patterns of newborn infant

Healthcare providers can help parents understand sleep patterns of newborn infant

Most parents are not surprised by the irregularity of a newborn infant's sleep patterns, but by six months or so many parents wonder if something is wrong with their baby or their sleeping arrangements if the baby is not sleeping through the night. Healthcare providers, specifically nurse practitioners, can help parents understand what "normal" sleep patterns are for their child, according to researchers. [More]
Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Investigators have found that young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower brain growth compared to children without diabetes. A new study, published in the December issue of Diabetes, now available ahead of print, suggests that continued exposure to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugars, may be detrimental to the developing brain. [More]
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago and the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have signed an affiliation agreement to enhance their existing partnership and provide expanded pediatric specialty medical services to their patients. [More]
Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Children who suffer from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome age prematurely due to a defective protein in their cells. Scientists at Technische Universität München have now identified another important pathological factor: the system responsible for removing cellular debris and for breaking down defective proteins operates at lower levels in HGPS cells than in normal cells. The researchers have succeeded in reactivating protein breakdown in HGPS cells and thus reducing disease-related defects by using a substance from broccoli. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
Energy drinks jolt children, adolescents with too much caffeine

Energy drinks jolt children, adolescents with too much caffeine

When children aged 10-14 consume energy drinks, one in five consumes too much caffeine. When their caffeine intake from other sources such as cola and chocolate is included, every second child and more than one in three adolescents aged 15-17 consume too much caffeine. [More]
New study aims to improve understanding of vinyl crib mattress covers

New study aims to improve understanding of vinyl crib mattress covers

The U.S. continues to look at the use and regulation of phthalates, which have been associated with health problems. Of particular concern is the safety of these plastic additives to children. A new study aims to improve our understanding of one possible exposure route for babies: vinyl crib mattress covers. [More]
UK doctors to test cannabis-based medicine for children with severe epilepsy

UK doctors to test cannabis-based medicine for children with severe epilepsy

Children with severe epilepsy could be helped by a new treatment derived from the cannabis plant. [More]
EGPAF to receive $63 million UNITAID grant to improve early infant diagnosis of HIV programs

EGPAF to receive $63 million UNITAID grant to improve early infant diagnosis of HIV programs

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is pleased to announce that it has been selected by the UNITAID Executive Board to receive up to $63 million in funding to improve early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV programs in nine African countries. This investment will pave the way for universal access to HIV testing and enable a ten-fold increase in HIV treatment, thus transforming the effort to end AIDS in children worldwide. [More]
UMass Amherst study: Naming between the ages of 6 and 9 months lays 'learning foundation'

UMass Amherst study: Naming between the ages of 6 and 9 months lays 'learning foundation'

In a follow-up to her earlier studies of learning in infancy, developmental psychologist Lisa Scott and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are reporting that talking to babies in their first year, in particular naming things in their world, can help them make connections between what they see and hear, and these learning benefits can be seen as much as five years later. [More]
New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

American children are generally safer and better-educated than they have been in 20 years, a new report from Duke University finds. [More]
U of M poll: Parents doubt older teens are ready to manage their health care

U of M poll: Parents doubt older teens are ready to manage their health care

Most parents agree their children should be ready to move out of the pediatrician's office into adult-focused care by age 18 - but just 30 percent actually make that transition by that age, according to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Study: New flooring can increase risk of respiratory diseases in infants

Study: New flooring can increase risk of respiratory diseases in infants

New flooring in the living environment of pregnant women significantly increases the risk of infants to suffer from respiratory diseases in their first year of life. This is the result of a study carried out by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the "St Georg" Municipal Hospital, which demonstrates that exposure to volatile organic compounds in the months before and after birth induces breathing problems in early childhood . [More]
Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

A study conducted by University of Granada scientists (from the Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Departments) and from the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada) has demonstrated that delaying the cutting of the umbilical cord in newborns by two minutes leads to a better development of the baby during the first days of life. [More]
Children who skip meals more likely to have excess body fat, increased cardiometabolic risk

Children who skip meals more likely to have excess body fat, increased cardiometabolic risk

Children who skip main meals are more likely to have excess body fat and an increased cardiometabolic risk already at the age of 6 to 8 years, according to a Finnish study. A higher consumption of sugary drinks, red meat and low-fat margarine and a lower consumption of vegetable oil are also related to a higher cardiometabolic risk. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1

UT Southwestern researchers identify possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1 or NF1, a childhood neurological disease characterized by learning deficits and autism that is caused by inherited mutations in the gene encoding a protein called neurofibromin. [More]