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Study underscores importance of newborn screening for Bubble Boy disease

The Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF) applauds a new study published August 19, 2014 in the Journal of the American Medical Association that underscores the importance of newborn screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), also known as Bubble Boy disease. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
Newborn screening indicates that incidence of SCID is higher than previously believed

Newborn screening indicates that incidence of SCID is higher than previously believed

Newborn screening performed in numerous states indicates that the incidence of the potentially life-threatening disorder, severe combined immunodeficiency, is higher than previously believed, at 1 in 58,000 births, although there is a high rate of survival, according to a study in the August 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

Researchers examine parental availability and kids’ eating habits

The way parents balance their work schedules may affect their adolescent children's eating habits, according to Penn State researchers. Those schedules may be even more important than the number of hours the parents spend at work, said Molly Martin, associate professor of sociology and demography. [More]
New CAPS video emphasizes the importance of clean cookstoves to prevent pneumonia

New CAPS video emphasizes the importance of clean cookstoves to prevent pneumonia

As the Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS) continues to reach significant milestones in terms of recruitment, the team have released a video filmed in Malawi explaining the main aims of the study and highlighting the potential importance of clean cookstoves in relation to preventing pneumonia in children under the age of five. [More]
Violent video games can cause depression in children, new study finds

Violent video games can cause depression in children, new study finds

While much attention has focused on the link between violent video game playing and aggression among youths, a new study finds significantly increased signs of depression among preteens with high daily exposure to violent video games. [More]
Higher-fit children have more compact white-matter tracts in the brain than lower-fit peers

Higher-fit children have more compact white-matter tracts in the brain than lower-fit peers

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. "White matter" describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity. [More]
Some mothers-to-be opt out of getting flu vaccine despite recommendations from physicians

Some mothers-to-be opt out of getting flu vaccine despite recommendations from physicians

Both mother and fetus are at increased risk for complications of flu infection during pregnancy. And prenatal care providers say they're advising women to get the flu vaccine, in line with recommendations from various organizations. But many pregnant women don't understand the importance of this advice-and don't get the vaccine. [More]
Natural killer cells can be used to combat acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Natural killer cells can be used to combat acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that a select team of immune-system cells from patients with leukemia can be multiplied in the lab, creating an army of natural killer cells that can be used to destroy the cancer cells. [More]
Children and adults face increased risk from umbilical hernias

Children and adults face increased risk from umbilical hernias

Though common wisdom will tell you that hernias only occur in men, usually adult men, this is far from the truth. While the majority of hernias do occur in males – with inguinal hernia symptoms in men particularly common – some types of hernia are not at all rare in women and children of all genders. [More]
UK study: Smoking during pregnancy has discernible effects on growth of grandkids

UK study: Smoking during pregnancy has discernible effects on growth of grandkids

A UK study published in the American Journal of Human Biology has found that smoking during pregnancy has discernible effects on the growth of a woman's future grandkids. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]
Santa Monica pediatricians use key safety measures to ensure worry-free vaccinations

Santa Monica pediatricians use key safety measures to ensure worry-free vaccinations

Before sending your kids off to school, it's more important than ever to keep them safe from potential illnesses through vaccination from an expertly trained medical professional. [More]
Study to explain how brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts

Study to explain how brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts

As children learn basic arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. The shift comes more easily for some kids than for others, but no one knows why. [More]
Parental incarceration can be more detrimental to child's well-being than divorce or death of a parent

Parental incarceration can be more detrimental to child's well-being than divorce or death of a parent

With more than 2 million people behind bars, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This mass incarceration has serious implications for not only the inmates, but their children, finds a new University of California-Irvine study. [More]

Exposure to visual experience outside womb may matter most for early gaze following

Following another person's gaze can reveal a wealth of information critical to social interactions and also to safety. Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it's visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability. [More]
Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. [More]
GPs review how well patient asthma is controlled

GPs review how well patient asthma is controlled

A new Clinical e-Audit from NPS MedicineWise has been released that will help GPs review just how well patient asthma is controlled. [More]
Study: 9/11 dust cloud linked to pregnancy issues

Study: 9/11 dust cloud linked to pregnancy issues

Pregnant women living near the World Trade Center during 9/11 experienced higher-than-normal negative birth outcomes, according to a new working paper by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. [More]
ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital verified as Level II Pediatric Trauma Center

ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital verified as Level II Pediatric Trauma Center

The American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma has verified ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital as a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center. This achievement recognizes Toledo Children's Hospital's dedication to providing the highest quality of trauma care for injured children and makes it the only verified pediatric trauma center in northwest Ohio. [More]