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Metabolic imbalance can trigger respiratory diseases in early childhood

Metabolic imbalance can trigger respiratory diseases in early childhood

An imbalance in our metabolism can trigger inflammatory processes in the body and activate the immune system. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, UFZ researchers have been able to show that this applies even to newborns and children under one year of age, and is correlated with the development of respiratory diseases in early childhood. [More]
Position statement on promise, challenges of non-invasive prenatal testing

Position statement on promise, challenges of non-invasive prenatal testing

Two of the world's largest professional societies of human geneticists have issued a joint position statement on the promise and challenges of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), a new procedure to test blood drawn from pregnant mothers for Down syndrome and other chromosomal disorders in the fetus. [More]
Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

A Singapore led study has shown that Hepatitis B Virus Infection (HBV) exposure increases the immune system maturation of infants, which may give a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life. These findings radically modify the way that HBV vertical infection of neonates (mother-to-child) is portrayed, and present a paradigm shift in the approach to treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B. [More]

TB Alliance, U.S. Fund for UNICEF partner to bring new TB treatments for children

TB Alliance has announced a new partnership with the U.S. Fund for UNICEF that will dramatically increase the scope and impact of child and maternal health programs around the world to include the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric tuberculosis (TB), a significant cause of child mortality. [More]
Claritas to present data on Pediatric Neurological Exome Assay and new sequencing approach at ACMG 2015

Claritas to present data on Pediatric Neurological Exome Assay and new sequencing approach at ACMG 2015

Claritas Genomics will present data on the quality of parallel multi-technology sequencing, a comparison of the company’s phenotypically driven Pediatric Neurology Exome Assay to whole exome and panel-based approaches, three-part reports for rapid results reporting, and the clinical utility of the Neurology Exome’s tailored approach compared to other tests currently on the market. [More]
FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved use of Quadracel (Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Absorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus; DTaP-IPV) vaccine for active immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis in children 4 through 6 years of age. [More]
Many teens still ignorant of significant physical danger posed by legal drugs

Many teens still ignorant of significant physical danger posed by legal drugs

Legal drugs such as OxyContin now kill more people than heroin and cocaine combined. While awareness of the dangers of illegal drugs has increased, many teens are still ignorant of the significant physical danger posed by legally prescribed drugs, according to a new study in Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. [More]
Brain-somatic-activating mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II

Brain-somatic-activating mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that afflicts more than 50 million people worldwide. Many epilepsy patients can control their symptoms through medication, but about 30% suffer from intractable epilepsy and are unable to manage the disease with drugs. Intractable epilepsy causes multiple seizures, permanent mental, physical, and developmental disabilities, and even death. [More]
Jr. NBA and FrieslandCampina partnership promotes active lifestyle in South-East Asian children

Jr. NBA and FrieslandCampina partnership promotes active lifestyle in South-East Asian children

FrieslandCampina and Jr. NBA today celebrate the first anniversary of their successful partnership designed to encourage an active lifestyle amongst children in South-East Asia. [More]
Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. A cardiometabolic risk score was used to evaluate cardiometabolic risk in different age groups. [More]
Non-invasive autopsy service nominated for national award

Non-invasive autopsy service nominated for national award

Sheffield’s radiology team are in the running for a top national medical award after establishing the world’s first minimally invasive autopsy service for babies and children who tragically die in the womb or 28 days after birth. [More]
TxCell to present at upcoming US and French investment conferences

TxCell to present at upcoming US and French investment conferences

Damian Marron, CEO, TxCell, will present at the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine's 3rd Annual Regen Med Investor Day, New York, March 25, 2015. In addition, Damian Marron will also participate at the Portzamparc PEA-PME Forum, Paris, April 1, 2015. [More]
Newly discovered bodily process may explain fetal brain bleeds

Newly discovered bodily process may explain fetal brain bleeds

A newly discovered bodily process in mice may explain why some human fetuses who have different antigens than their mothers suffer life-threatening brain bleeds, according to a new study. [More]
Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals' rational taste preferences

Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals' rational taste preferences

Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals' rational taste preferences and apply insights from behavioral economics to design choice architecture that increases their likelihood of success, say two physician-scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics in an editorial published in JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Birmingham academics educate Chinese grandparents to tackle childhood obesity

Birmingham academics educate Chinese grandparents to tackle childhood obesity

Academics from the University of Birmingham, UK are engaging with grandparents in China, to help tackle the increasing problem of obesity amongst Chinese children in a trailblazing public health programme. [More]

Scientists use DNA sequencing to trace the spread of drug-resistant TB

Scientists have for the first time used DNA sequencing to trace the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis between patients in the UK. [More]

Arthritis Awareness Week capped off with amazing William's Walk event

Hundreds of people joined Arthritis & Osteoporosis NSW in walking Parramatta Park in aid of juvenile arthritis, a condition that is rarely discussed in the community. William’s Walk was crucial in getting the word out that juvenile arthritis affects 6000+ children throughout NSW, raising over $50,000 in the process. [More]
Most child pedestrian injuries occur near schools, bus stops, and in the spring months

Most child pedestrian injuries occur near schools, bus stops, and in the spring months

New research presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that most child pedestrian injuries involving a motor vehicle occurred while children were unsupervised, near schools and bus stops, and in the spring months during the afternoon and evening hours. [More]
Harmful effects of smoking may be reflected in the facial movements of unborn babies

Harmful effects of smoking may be reflected in the facial movements of unborn babies

The harmful effects of smoking during pregnancy may be reflected in the facial movements of mothers' unborn babies, new research has suggested. [More]
Cancer survival lower for Indigenous Australians

Cancer survival lower for Indigenous Australians

Cancer Council Queensland is calling for enhanced joint efforts to improve Indigenous cancer control following the release of research findings that cancer survival is lower for Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australians for all cancers combined, and for many specific types of cancer. [More]
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