Child Health News RSS Feed - Child Health News

SIPPET study may have implications for treatment of patients with severe hemophilia A

SIPPET study may have implications for treatment of patients with severe hemophilia A

SIPPET, a study which involved 42 centers in 14 countries in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia was designed to definitively settle the long-debated question whether factor VIII concentrates from different sources (plasma-derived containing VWF or recombinant technology) differ in risk of inhibitor development in previously untreated children (PUPs) with severe hemophilia A. [More]
University of Leicester researcher awarded grant to develop bacteriophages to target infant Shigella

University of Leicester researcher awarded grant to develop bacteriophages to target infant Shigella

A University of Leicester researcher has been awarded funding to develop bacteriophages to target bacterial infant diarrhoea in the developing world where it causes significant mortality. [More]
Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

Researcher proposes three-point plan to identify, eliminate lead exposure nationwide

The crisis of lead-contaminated drinking water in Flint, Mich., continues to make headlines—but it's just the most prominent example of an "ongoing and needless tragedy of childhood lead poisoning," according David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH, a noted authority on childhood lead poisoning prevention. [More]
Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Updates on sixty-ninth World Health Assembly

Delegates at the World Health Assembly have agreed resolutions and decisions on air pollution, chemicals, the health workforce, childhood obesity, violence, noncommunicable diseases, and the election of the next Director-General. [More]

Electronic media use may affect parent-child communication

It happens in many households. Kids are tapping on their cell phones or are preoccupied by their favorite TV show as their parents ask them a question or want them to do a chore. [More]
Bereaved parents feel that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement

Bereaved parents feel that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement

Many pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists believe that their clinical care extends from treating ill children through end-of-life care. However, are pediatricians actually meeting the needs of families and their dying child? In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers surveyed bereaved parents and found that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement. [More]

World Health Assembly commits to implement two new health strategies

Delegates at the World Health Assembly today agreed to implement 2 new health strategies that are closely aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals. One relates to women's children's and adolescents' health; the other to healthy ageing. [More]
Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

More young people of all ages are surviving cancer than ever before, but new research published today in The Lancet Oncology journal shows that adolescents and young adults have a lower chance of surviving eight relatively common types of cancer than children, according to the latest data from a long-running study of cancer survival across Europe. [More]
Spexin harmone may play role in weight gain among teenagers

Spexin harmone may play role in weight gain among teenagers

A Mayo Clinic-led study found that obese teenagers have lower levels of a hormone potentially tied to weight management than teens of normal weights. The study is published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Early-life stress may lead to functional dyspepsia in adulthood

Traumatic events early in life can increase levels of norepinephrine—the primary hormone responsible for preparing the body to react to stressful situations—in the gut, increasing the risk of developing chronic indigestion and anxiety during adulthood, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology reports. [More]
Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation alone, and immune disorder may be part of the cause, according to a review led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Oxford researchers discover genes that make children more susceptible to bacteraemia

Oxford researchers discover genes that make children more susceptible to bacteraemia

A team led by Oxford University has identified genes that make certain children more susceptible to invasive bacterial infections by performing a large genome-wide association study in African children. [More]
New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

Eleven-year-old Martin Mwita, of Omaha, has made more than 300 visits to health care facilities since he was a baby. Because of sickle cell disease, he's suffered three strokes and countless other health episodes. [More]
Gene mutation linked to autism plays key role in formation, maturation of synapses

Gene mutation linked to autism plays key role in formation, maturation of synapses

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals that a gene mutation associated with autism plays a critical role in the formation and maturation of synapses -- the connections that allow neurons to communicate with each other. [More]

Tips to protect infants from the sun

As the summer season kicks off, UCLA Health pediatrician Dr. Jay Joo offers advice on sun safety for babies. [More]
Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Most people have heard the old adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." It's an old truth that encompasses more than just apples--eating fruit in general is well known to reduce risk for a wide variety of health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. [More]
New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

As the 69th World Health Assembly discusses progress on the Global Vaccine Action Plan, a new data visualization platform--from the International Vaccine Access Center at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health--provides stark numbers on where shortfalls exist in vaccine introduction and coverage. [More]
Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Researchers studying babies with a Zika virus-related birth defect say they have found previously unreported eye problems possibly linked to the virus that could result in severe visual impairment. [More]
Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers already show signs of hormonal differences from normal-weight peers that may make them prone to weight gain, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement