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Einstein, Montefiore receive grant to establish home health services for people with IDD

Einstein, Montefiore receive grant to establish home health services for people with IDD

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center in collaboration with Developmental Disabilities Health Alliance of New York and Community Resource Center for the Developmentally Disabled, Inc., have received a $2.4 million grant to integrate medical and mental healthcare for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). [More]
Innovative treatment option for children with plastic bronchitis

Innovative treatment option for children with plastic bronchitis

A case study published recently in the journal Pediatrics describes an innovative, minimally invasive procedure that treated plastic bronchitis, a potentially life-threatening disease, in a six-year-old boy with a heart condition. Using new lymphatic imaging tools and catheterization techniques, physician-researchers eliminated bronchial casts, which are an accumulation of lymphatic material that clogged the child's airway. [More]
Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Frustrated with the slow pace of implementation of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), Vicki and Fred Modell renewed a multi-million dollar commitment to screen every baby born in every state for this life threatening condition, often referred to as "Bubble Boy" disease. [More]
Maternal nutrition before conception important to improve offspring’s health, say researchers

Maternal nutrition before conception important to improve offspring’s health, say researchers

Researchers from the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, believe the key to making future generations healthier could lie before the mother becomes pregnant. [More]
Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the genome informatics company, announced today the identification of de novo KCNB1 missense mutations as a novel genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy. Cypher’s co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer Ali Torkamani, Ph.D. reviewed the data today at a platform presentation at the ASHG 2014 meeting being held October 18 to 22 in San Diego. [More]
Researchers find frequency, severity of medication errors among young children

Researchers find frequency, severity of medication errors among young children

According to Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers, 63,000 children under the age of six experienced out-of-hospital medication errors annually between 2002 and 2012. One child is affected every eight minutes, usually by a well-meaning parent or caregiver unintentionally committing a medication error. [More]
CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

University of Nebraska Medical Center researcher, William Rizzo, M.D., has received a five-year, $3.3 million grant to study 10 rare diseases that affect children beginning in infancy or early childhood and throughout their life. [More]

Rosecrance’s traveling art exhibit helps parents prevent drug addiction in teenagers

Rosecrance, one of the country's leading teen substance abuse treatment centers, has launched a traveling art exhibit to help parents understand teenagers' points of view about pressures they encounter and how they are faced with the potential to use, and abuse, substances. [More]
EGPAF celebrates 'A Time for Heroes' event

EGPAF celebrates 'A Time for Heroes' event

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) celebrated its 25th annual A Time for Heroes family festival on Sunday, Oct. 19 at the BookBindery in Culver City. [More]

FORUM ONE conference invites people to donate for Operation Smile charity

An actor, director, producer and screenwriter knows how important a smile is in a career and life. "The ability to smile is an integral part of life," said Van Damme. "The absence of a smile is hostile to our nature, to the joy. You must have a strange feeling when you see a child or an adult, who can't smile and you can. So I want to help. I became famous and I need to use it for good causes." [More]
Group B streptococcus is the leading cause of infection in newborns

Group B streptococcus is the leading cause of infection in newborns

The findings suggest that this disturbing trend could be due the emergence of more virulent group B streptococcal strains and call for a renewed evaluation of preventive strategies to reduce neonatal disease. [More]
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
iExaminer smartphone system: A low-cost option for ocular imaging in pediatric patients

iExaminer smartphone system: A low-cost option for ocular imaging in pediatric patients

Smartphone technology is a widely available resource which may also be a portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, according to results of a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Researchers from the [More]
Children infected with enterovirus more likely to have type 1 diabetes

Children infected with enterovirus more likely to have type 1 diabetes

A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that children who have been infected with enterovirus are 48% more likely to have developed type 1 diabetes. The study is by Dr Tsai Chung-Li, China Medical University, Taiwan, and colleagues. [More]
Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells. The study has been published online in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. [More]
Cannabis use during adolescence: an interview with Dr Edmund Silins

Cannabis use during adolescence: an interview with Dr Edmund Silins

We know quite a lot about the effects of cannabis on the body and brain but there is still a need to better understand its impact on the health, well-being and development of long term users. [More]
Researchers reveal hidden benefits of healthy eating, exercise during pregnancy

Researchers reveal hidden benefits of healthy eating, exercise during pregnancy

It might not be obvious on the scales, but healthy eating and increased physical activity from walking during pregnancy is directly associated with a range of improved outcomes at birth, according to researchers from the University of Adelaide. [More]
CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

For many months, the world has witnessed the Ebola virus spread and claim more than 4,400 lives in West African countries. On Oct. 8, the first confirmed adult Ebola patient identified in the United States died. The constant news coverage has heightened concern among parents who fear their children will become infected. Jill Hoffman, MD, a pediatric Infectious diseases specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, discusses the facts about Ebola, how parents can help their children prevent further outbreak by teaching them good hygiene, and how CHLA is prepared to identify and treat suspected Ebola patients. [More]
Kalorama Information: Experimental vaccine distribution in the UK points to growing flu vaccine market

Kalorama Information: Experimental vaccine distribution in the UK points to growing flu vaccine market

Kalorama Information believes an experimental vaccine distribution in the United Kingdom and other similar developments point to a growing flu vaccine market, as well as a growing market for the production of these vaccines. [More]