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Engineering students create wearable treatment for infant jaundice

Around 60 percent of infants are born jaundiced and many spend their first days of life isolated underneath special lights that help them eliminate the excess bilirubin in their bloodstreams. [More]

New multi-disciplinary project to examine what works best for abused children

University of York researchers are launching a new multi-disciplinary project to examine what works best for abused or neglected children - going into care or staying at home with support. [More]

Biting into whole foods can make children rowdy

There's a new secret to get your child to behave at the dinner table-cut up their food and they'll relax. A new Cornell study published in Eating Behaviors, found that when 6-10 year old children ate foods they had to bite with their front teeth- such as drumsticks, whole apples, or corn on the cob- they were rowdier than when these foods had been cut. [More]

Study: Excessive fetal growth increases risk of stillbirth

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch and the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network have identified a link between stillbirth and either restricted or excessive fetal growth. Findings from the study are online in the April 22 issue of PLOS Medicine. [More]

Older parents are more likely to have child with autism spectrum disorder, says study

Older parents are more likely to have a child who develops an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than are younger parents. A recent study from researchers from the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia and Karolinska Institute in Sweden provides more insight into how the risk associated with parental age varies between mothers' and fathers' ages, and found that the risk of having a child with both ASD and intellectual disability is larger for older parents. [More]
Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored from birth to reveal the first signs of cognitive dysfunction, using a new technique piloted by a London-based university collaboration. [More]
Doctors must consider factors when administering combination vaccines, say researchers

Doctors must consider factors when administering combination vaccines, say researchers

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. [More]
Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

While 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions, only 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns' genomes. [More]

The Help Group presents ‘Help Humanitarian Award’ at 17th Annual Teddy Bear Ball event

On Wednesday, April 23, 2014, The Help Group will host its 17th Annual Teddy Bear Ball to benefit children with autism and other special needs at The Beverly Hilton Hotel. [More]

Stool color guide and free mobile app help diagnose liver-ravaging disorder in babies

Fecal color and consistency are well-known markers of digestive health in both children and adults, but paying attention to a newborn's shade of poop can be a decided lifesaver in babies born with the rare, liver-ravaging disorder biliary atresia, commonly heralded by white or clay-colored stool. [More]

Race to Yes campaign lauds Sarepta's plans to seek FDA approval for Duchenne treatment

The Race to Yes campaign today lauded drug maker Sarepta on its plans to move forward immediately to seek FDA approval of the first drug to successfully treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the world's leading genetic killer of children. [More]

Prevalence of celiac disease on the rise among children with irritable bowel syndrome

There appears to be an increased prevalence of celiac disease among children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Children get codeine in U.S. emergency rooms, despite risks: Study

Children get codeine in U.S. emergency rooms, despite risks: Study

Despite its potentially harmful effects in children, codeine continues to be prescribed in U.S. emergency rooms, according to new research from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco. [More]

Study: Maternal diet could have impact on food allergy in later life of children

About 20 million Europeans are subject to food allergies. Now scientists are looking at these allergies in new ways. It involves the food industry in its work and pays special attention to the link between early diets and allergy in later life. Clare Mills, professor of allergy in the university's Institute of Inflammation and Repair, at the University of Manchester, UK, is the coordinator of iFAAM. [More]

Findings open up new avenues for research into ADHD and other attention-related problems

In a new study, Indiana University cognitive scientists Catarina Vales and Linda Smith demonstrate that children spot objects more quickly when prompted by words than if they are only prompted by images. [More]
Study suggests that improving newborns' bacterial environment could fend off infections

Study suggests that improving newborns' bacterial environment could fend off infections

Mothers give a newborn baby a gift of germs-germs that help to kick-start the infant's immune system. But antibiotics, used to fend off infection, may paradoxically interrupt a newborn's own immune responses, leaving already-vulnerable premature babies more susceptible to dangerous pathogens. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]

LSTM researchers to conduct extensive research on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in African children

​Researchers from LSTM have called for more research to be carried out into HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]

Probiotics usage proves ineffective for infant colic symptoms

​Colic affects about one in five infants in the United States annually and accounts for numerous pediatric visits during the first several months after birth. [More]
Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Certain prenatal risk factors are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease in children, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Future studies should investigate whether modifying these factors could help protect children's kidney health. [More]