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Gameplay patterns on iPad could help identify children with autism

Gameplay patterns on iPad could help identify children with autism

Autism could be diagnosed by allowing children to play games on smart phones and tablets, a study involving the University of Strathclyde has found. [More]
New orthotopic model recapitulates more closely metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma

New orthotopic model recapitulates more closely metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma

The Sarcoma research group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, has developed a modified version of an orthotopic model that allows researchers to recreate more closely the metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma (ES), the second most common bone tumor in children and adolescents. [More]
Outpatient CLABSIs costly for pediatric stem cell transplant and oncology patient population

Outpatient CLABSIs costly for pediatric stem cell transplant and oncology patient population

Pediatric stem cell transplant and cancer patients often are discharged from the hospital with an external central venous line for medications that parents or other caregivers must clean and flush daily to avoid potentially life-threatening infections. [More]
NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently identified compounds that potentially can be used to inhibit Zika virus replication and reduce its ability to kill brain cells. [More]
Cleft palate repair costs the same for internationally adopted children

Cleft palate repair costs the same for internationally adopted children

Since 2009, United States residents have adopted more children from China than any other country. Since China has a high prevalence of cleft lip and palate, some of these children require extra medical care early in their lives. Many prospective families are fearful of the treatment costs needed by a child affected by cleft lip and palate. However, recent research suggests that the costs are not nearly as high as previously thought. [More]
Dr Google is here to stay - so how do you do it safely?

Dr Google is here to stay - so how do you do it safely?

Almost four out of five Australians (78%) report that they look for information about medicines on the internet, according to a new 2016 survey* released during Be Medicinewise Week (22-28 August). [More]
iPad use before surgery requiring anaesthesia effective in reducing child anxiety

iPad use before surgery requiring anaesthesia effective in reducing child anxiety

New research presented at this year's World Congress of Anaesthesiologists in Hong Kong (Aug. 28 - Sept. 2) shows that allowing children to use iPads to distract them before surgery requiring general anaesthesia is as effective at lowering their anxiety as conventional sedatives. [More]
School intervention costing less than USD $0.20 per student stops increase in BMI

School intervention costing less than USD $0.20 per student stops increase in BMI

A school intervention costing less than 20 cents per child has stopped unhealthy weight gain. The randomised study is presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Ms Daniela Schneid Schuh, a nutritionist at the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil. [More]
Skin cells derived from autistic donors grow faster than those from control subjects

Skin cells derived from autistic donors grow faster than those from control subjects

Brain cells grow faster in children with some forms of autism due to distinct changes in core cell signaling patterns, according to research from the laboratory of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD, chair of the department of genetics and genome sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical, LLC announced today they will introduce a ground breaking hyper-targeted marketing tool at the 5th Annual World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, from October 5th-8th 2016 in Montreal, Canada. [More]
Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children. [More]
SSRI treatment improves cognitive and social functioning in young children with fragile X

SSRI treatment improves cognitive and social functioning in young children with fragile X

Treatment with sertraline may provide nominal but important improvements in cognition and social participation in very young children with fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the leading single-gene cause of autism, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. [More]
Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco sales within 1,000 feet of schools could reduce socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco density across neighborhoods, according to a study being published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. [More]
Naturally-occurring sugars in woman's breast milk may protect infants against life threatening bacteria

Naturally-occurring sugars in woman's breast milk may protect infants against life threatening bacteria

A type of sugar found naturally in some women's breast milk may protect newborn babies from infection with a potentially life threatening bacterium called Group B streptococcus, according to a new study from Imperial College London. [More]
Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

More than half of children with epilepsy outgrow their seizures, yet the mechanism underlying this remission is unknown. [More]
New article outlines how school nurses can help teens experiencing digital dating abuse

New article outlines how school nurses can help teens experiencing digital dating abuse

Many teens experience physical or sexual abuse within their romantic relationships and now dating violence can also be perpetrated digitally by harassing, stalking or controlling a romantic partner via technology and social media. [More]
Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

A teenage pregnancy prevention programme involving a baby simulator does not appear to have any long-term effect on reducing the risk of teenage pregnancy, according to the first randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of this intervention, published in The Lancet today. [More]
Chromatrap develops new range of optimised ChIP assay kits for genetic research

Chromatrap develops new range of optimised ChIP assay kits for genetic research

Chromatrap is a pioneer in the development of solid-state filter-based technology that significantly enhances and accelerates the important epigenetic research tool of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). [More]
Baby simulator dolls may encourage pregnancy in teenage girls

Baby simulator dolls may encourage pregnancy in teenage girls

The use of dolls that mimic real babies may encourage rather than deter teenage girls from getting pregnant according to the results of a controlled randomized trial. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
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