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Study: Cervical pessary does not reduce preterm births, neonatal complications in twin pregnancies

Study: Cervical pessary does not reduce preterm births, neonatal complications in twin pregnancies

Having twins accounts for only 1.5% of all births but 25% of preterm births, the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. Successful strategies for reducing singleton preterm births include prophylactic use of progesterone and cervical cerclage in patients with a prior history of preterm birth. [More]
Tampa General Hospital achieves Baby-Friendly hospital designation

Tampa General Hospital achieves Baby-Friendly hospital designation

Tampa General Hospital is the first hospital in Hillsborough County – and one of only three in the Tampa Bay area – to earn the Baby-Friendly hospital designation from Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. for its commitment to supporting breastfeeding mothers and their babies. [More]
Most American schools implement healthy practices to meet federal school meal standards

Most American schools implement healthy practices to meet federal school meal standards

Most schools in the U.S. are implementing healthy practices to help meet federal school meal standards by offering whole grains, more fruits and vegetables, and reducing sodium content, according to data published today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Researchers identify drugs that may enhance ability of TKI dasatinib to kill human cancer cells

Researchers identify drugs that may enhance ability of TKI dasatinib to kill human cancer cells

Researchers have discovered how a common mutation in a high-risk leukemia subtype drives the cancer's aggressiveness and have identified drugs that may work with existing precision medicines to improve survival. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which was published online today in the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Studies are revealing that children born through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The increased risk is due to changes in the expression of the genes important for vascular health. These studies suggest that the composition of the solutions in which embryo fertilization and culturing are done is to blame. [More]
Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels for kindergarteners are low for most states and infant vaccination rates are high nationally, according to data from two reports published in this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

About 10 percent of mothers experienced chronic, persistent depressive symptoms two years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing hundreds of thousands and causing widespread damage estimated at more than $100 billion, according to a Georgia State University study. [More]
Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

Children exposed to toxic air pollutants at home more likely to have lower GPAs

A University of Texas at El Paso study on children's health has found that fourth and fifth graders who are exposed to toxic air pollutants at home are more likely to have lower GPAs. [More]

Prep Rally events commemorate 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, empower children to take action

Save the Children and its animal ambassador Lassie hosted fun "Prep Rally" events here this week to help local children build resiliency and feel safe as the city commemorates the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. [More]
School meals become more nutritious

School meals become more nutritious

The amount of whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables offered in school meals is up and sodium is down, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Thursday. [More]
Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings. [More]
NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

Some children react more strongly to negative experiences than others. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found a link between aggression and variants of a particular gene. [More]
Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that pregnant women in Sweden had inadequate levels of iodine in their diets. Proper iodine nutrition is necessary for neurological development of the fetus. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Most people assume strokes only happen to octogenarians, but recent evidence suggests that survivors of childhood cancer have a high risk of suffering a stroke at a surprisingly young age. [More]
New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

Obese women are nearly twice as likely as their lean counterparts to have stillborn babies for several specific, potentially preventable medical reasons, a new University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals. [More]
New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back to school: Taking a gadget to bed could really hurt their sleep. [More]
Novartis receives FDA approval for expanded use of Promacta for younger children with rare blood disorder

Novartis receives FDA approval for expanded use of Promacta for younger children with rare blood disorder

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved an expanded use for Promacta to include children 1 year of age and older with chronic immune thrombocytopenia who have had an insufficient response to corticosteroids, immunoglobulins or splenectomy. [More]
Variations in opioid receptor genes linked to neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in newborn babies

Variations in opioid receptor genes linked to neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in newborn babies

A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published online in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of individualized treatment plans tailored to each infants' risk of requiring medication to curb their NAS symptoms, which could help improve these patients' outcomes and reduce how long some stay in the hospital. [More]
Paramedic care improves survival for paediatric patients who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital

Paramedic care improves survival for paediatric patients who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital

Less than 10 per cent of paediatric patients who suffer a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital survive. There are many factors which can influence survival rates; paramedic care is one of them. [More]
New funding supports pilot study that aims to address national crisis in children's oral health

New funding supports pilot study that aims to address national crisis in children's oral health

Researchers at Plymouth University Peninsula School of Dentistry have received funding of around £150,000 from the Medical Research Council to support a pilot study which aims to go some way towards addressing the national crisis in children's oral health, especially in communities of social deprivation. [More]
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