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Uptake of HPV vaccine in US is unacceptably low

Uptake of HPV vaccine in US is unacceptably low

Data from the CDC's 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) published today show that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine continues to be underutilized. [More]
University of Miami researchers find that early joint attention predicts later autism symptoms

University of Miami researchers find that early joint attention predicts later autism symptoms

Some babies are at risk for autism because they have an older sibling that has the disorder. To find new ways to detect Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) earlier in life, researchers are exploring the subtleties of babies' interactions with others and how they relate to the possibility and severity of future symptoms. [More]
Children who experience stress early in life have emotional, physical health problems

Children who experience stress early in life have emotional, physical health problems

Children who have been abused or neglected early in life are at risk for developing both emotional and physical health problems. [More]
Researchers examine association between ritual circumcision procedure and HSV-1 in infants

Researchers examine association between ritual circumcision procedure and HSV-1 in infants

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society found. [More]
New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

Researchers at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center announced results of a clinical trial of a new drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). [More]
Findings highlight challenges associated with packing healthful foods to send to school

Findings highlight challenges associated with packing healthful foods to send to school

Open a child's lunch box and you're likely to find that the lunches and snacks inside fall short of federal guidelines. Those are the findings of a study conducted by researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. [More]
Tulane University psychiatrist to study how parental bond with children leaves lasting genetic protection

Tulane University psychiatrist to study how parental bond with children leaves lasting genetic protection

Tulane University psychiatrist Dr. Stacy Drury has been given $2.4 million by the National Institutes of Health to test a provocative new theory - how well children bond with a parent in the first year of life leaves lasting genetic protection, potentially shielding them from disease risks well into adulthood. [More]

Study: Natural-terrain schoolyards help reduce children's stress and inattention

Playing in schoolyards that feature natural habitats and trees and not just asphalt and recreation equipment reduces children's stress and inattention, according to a University of Colorado Boulder study. [More]
VCU awarded $3 million grant to study how childhood adverse experiences create long-term health risks

VCU awarded $3 million grant to study how childhood adverse experiences create long-term health risks

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a five-year, $3 million grant to study how adverse experiences such as severe illnesses, neglect and maltreatment during childhood leave molecular marks in DNA that predict health risks later in life. [More]
Parents severely underestimate time children spend on digital devices

Parents severely underestimate time children spend on digital devices

According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), parents severely underestimate the time their children spend on digital devices. An AOA survey reports that 83 percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 estimate they use an electronic device for three or more hours each day. [More]
Parents expect information about circumcision, not recommendation from health-care providers

Parents expect information about circumcision, not recommendation from health-care providers

Most parents expect healthcare providers to answer their questions about circumcision, but they don't want a specific recommendation on the procedure, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]

Automatic word processing skills are not fully developed in young readers, shows study

Teachers-in-training have long been taught that fourth grade is when students stop learning to read and start reading to learn. [More]
Study analyses whether connectivity of infant's brain is related to children's impulsiveness

Study analyses whether connectivity of infant's brain is related to children's impulsiveness

Researchers from the University of Murcia have studied the changes in the brain that are associated with impulsiveness, a personality trait that causes difficulties in inhibiting a response in the face of a stimulus and leads to unplanned actions without considering the negative consequences. [More]
Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Parents of obese kids often do not recognize serious health consequences of childhood weight gain

Parents of obese kids often do not recognize serious health consequences of childhood weight gain

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight. [More]
First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. A new study that doubles the number of cases now documented in the scientific literature provides the most definitive characterization of CS to date. [More]
EGPAF experts to deliver presentations at AIDS 2014

EGPAF experts to deliver presentations at AIDS 2014

Experts from the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) will give oral presentations, moderate conference events, and exhibit a variety of educational posters and abstracts related to ending AIDS in children. [More]
Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

One in every 2,000 babies is born with a skull that can't grow normally. Various sections of these babies' skulls are fused together at joints called sutures, constricting the developing brain and disrupting vision, sleep, eating and IQ. For these young patients, risky skull-expanding surgeries become an almost annual event. [More]
Impaired inhibition of medium spiny neurons linked to depression-like behavior in juvenile WKY rats

Impaired inhibition of medium spiny neurons linked to depression-like behavior in juvenile WKY rats

Accumulating evidence suggests that the nucleus accumbens, which is involved in mechanisms of reward and addiction, plays a role in the pathogenesis of depression and in the action of antidepressants. [More]
Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

Mother's nurturing role directly molds early neural activity of her offsprings' brain

By carefully watching nearly a hundred hours of video showing mother rats protecting, warming, and feeding their young pups, and then matching up what they saw to real-time electrical readings from the pups' brains, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that the mother's presence and social interactions - her nurturing role - directly molds the early neural activity and growth of her offsprings' brain. [More]