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TSRI scientists uncover unique mechanism of natural product with antimicrobial, anti-cancer effects

TSRI scientists uncover unique mechanism of natural product with antimicrobial, anti-cancer effects

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered the unique mechanism of a powerful natural product with wide-ranging antifungal, antibacterial, anti-malaria and anti-cancer effects. [More]
Study examines efficacy of continuous UV-C robots versus pulsed xenon in preventing infection

Study examines efficacy of continuous UV-C robots versus pulsed xenon in preventing infection

The efficacy of continuous UV-C disinfection robots versus pulsed xenon (PU-UX) was highlighted in a recently published study of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection systems by an influential infection prevention research team, including Curtis Donskey, M.D. [More]
NIH awards $2.1 million grant to counter antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

NIH awards $2.1 million grant to counter antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Dr. Walter Fast, associate professor of medicinal chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Pharmacy, a four-year $2.1 million grant to develop small-molecules that counter antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. If successful, the research could lead to new drugs for treating bacterial infections that are resistant to most antibiotics. [More]
Research reveals stark variation in genetic tests for inherited eye disease in England

Research reveals stark variation in genetic tests for inherited eye disease in England

New research from The University of Manchester published in the Journal of Community Genetics reveals a stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye disease in England. [More]
New study sheds light on natural small molecule with antimicrobial effects

New study sheds light on natural small molecule with antimicrobial effects

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered the unique mechanism of a powerful natural product with wide-ranging antifungal, antibacterial, anti-malaria and anti-cancer effects. [More]
New research reveals how a deadly fungus grows and kills immune cells

New research reveals how a deadly fungus grows and kills immune cells

New research from the University of Toronto has scientists re-thinking how a lethal fungus grows and kills immune cells. The study hints at a new approach to therapy for Candida albicans, one of the most common causes of bloodstream infections. [More]
New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients. [More]
Antibodies from dromedary camels may prove therapeutic for MERS patients

Antibodies from dromedary camels may prove therapeutic for MERS patients

Antibodies from dromedary camels protected uninfected mice from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and helped infected mice expunge the disease, according to a study published online March 18th in the Journal of Virology, a journal published by the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

An outbreak of a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain resistant to antibiotics has been linked to contaminated endoscopes in a Washington state hospital. The study indicates that industry standard cleaning guidelines, which were exceeded by hospital staff, may not be sufficient for sterilizing endoscopes adequately. [More]
New approach allows researchers to trap and watch highly motile cells

New approach allows researchers to trap and watch highly motile cells

Optical imaging of highly motile cells or cells in suspension, such as bacterial systems, yeast cells, and immune cells, is a challenging task, in many cases it is just not possible. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), for example, can spread very efficiently from an infected T cell to an uninfected T cell through direct cell-cell contact. [More]
Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Researchers at Upstate Medical University, in collaboration with a team of international investigators studying dengue fever, have discovered new information on climate drivers of the disease and social risk factors that may be contributing to its spread, according to two scientific papers recently published in BMC Infectious Disease and BMC Public Health, open access, peer-reviewed online journals. [More]
Ebola epidemic reveals critical weaknesses in global public health system

Ebola epidemic reveals critical weaknesses in global public health system

In the year since the World Health Organization (WHO) was first notified of an outbreak of what proved to be Ebola virus disease in the west African country of Guinea, more than 24,000 cases have been reported and over 10,000 individuals have died - primarily in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. [More]
Effective therapy enables immune system recovery in majority of children

Effective therapy enables immune system recovery in majority of children

Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment, according to a new study conducted by researchers at UCLA and other institutions in the U.S. and Brazil. [More]
Synthetic Biologics begins SYN-004 Phase 2a clinical trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics begins SYN-004 Phase 2a clinical trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced the initiation of a Phase 2a clinical trial to evaluate the gastrointestinal (GI) antibiotic-degrading effects and the safety of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent C. difficile infection (CDI). [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
Study: Use of hand disinfection, aseptic techniques during risk-prone invasive procedures is very low

Study: Use of hand disinfection, aseptic techniques during risk-prone invasive procedures is very low

An observational study by Sahlgrenska Academy researchers at a large Swedish hospital found 2,393 opportunities for hand disinfection and/or aseptic techniques. Doctors and nurses missed 90% of the opportunities. [More]
Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Traditionally, to understand how a gene functions, a scientist would breed an organism that lacks that gene - "knocking it out" - then ask how the organism has changed. Are its senses affected? Its behavior? [More]
Study suggests new approach to help prevent meningococcal outbreaks

Study suggests new approach to help prevent meningococcal outbreaks

Nasal drops of harmless bacteria can inhibit a related bug that sometimes causes meningococcal disease, according to new findings published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The study--conducted among college students, a group at higher risk for this often serious illness--suggests a new approach that could help suppress outbreaks of the disease, if supported by future research. [More]
Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood of falls and collisions. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections

Fecal microbiota transplantation more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections

Distasteful though it sounds, the transplantation of fecal matter is more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections than previously thought. [More]
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