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Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

It was recently announced that new estimates indicated over 650,000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs). Which countries are these and why are so many children developing TB in these areas? [More]
New pill-only antiviral drug regimens could cure hardest-to-treat hepatitis C

New pill-only antiviral drug regimens could cure hardest-to-treat hepatitis C

Two new pill-only antiviral drug regimens could provide shorter, more effective treatment options with fewer side effects for the majority of patients infected with hepatitis C, even those most difficult to treat, according to the results of two studies published in The Lancet. [More]
Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Achalasia is a rare disease - it affects 1 in 100,000 people - characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. [More]
First systematic analysis indicates that about 1 in 3000 donors in England have HEV

First systematic analysis indicates that about 1 in 3000 donors in England have HEV

The first systematic analysis of hepatitis E virus (HEV) transmission by blood components indicates that about 1 in 3000 donors in England have HEV in their plasma. The findings, published in The Lancet, suggest that around 1200 HEV-containing blood components (eg, red cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma) are likely to be transfused every year in England. [More]
Researchers identify porcine enterovirus G using next-generation sequencing

Researchers identify porcine enterovirus G using next-generation sequencing

He calls himself the bug hunter, but the target of his work consists of viruses that can only be found and identified with special methods and instruments. [More]
Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

About 100 drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other purposes can also prevent the growth of certain bacterial pathogens inside human cells, including those that cause Legionnaires' disease, brucellosis, and Mediterranean spotted fever. [More]
"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than handshaking

"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than handshaking

"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving, while still addressing the cultural expectation of hand-to-hand contact between patients and clinicians, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). [More]
Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Noroviruses are a group of viruses. They're the leading cause of gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting. They affect the whole age range from young children to the elderly, and, in the US, they cause about 20 million cases annually. [More]
New study in recognition of World Hepatitis Day released on Life Sciences Connect

New study in recognition of World Hepatitis Day released on Life Sciences Connect

The Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters, the world's leading source of intelligent information for businesses and professionals, today released a new study in recognition of World Hepatitis Day on Life Sciences Connect, a blog exploring the latest news and trends in Life Sciences and updates on the drug pipeline identifying multiple treatments in development that may serve as potential alternatives to Gilead's Sovaldi, currently priced in the United States at $84,000 for 12 weeks of treatment - $1000 per pill. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]
Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. [More]
Surgical patient safety program significantly reduces cardiac surgical site infections

Surgical patient safety program significantly reduces cardiac surgical site infections

A common postoperative complication after open heart operations-infection at the surgical site-has been reduced by 77 percent at a Canadian hospital through its participation in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP-), according to a new case study presented at the 2014 ACS NSQIP National Conference. [More]
Scientists find high proportion of oral bacteria in gut microbiota of liver cirrhosis patients

Scientists find high proportion of oral bacteria in gut microbiota of liver cirrhosis patients

Scientists from INRA in collaboration with a Chinese team found that the gut microbiota[1] of individuals with liver cirrhosis differ notably from healthy individuals', showing a high proportion of oral bacteria. [More]
Trinidad & Tobago Ministry of Health approves hepatitis C drug telaprevir

Trinidad & Tobago Ministry of Health approves hepatitis C drug telaprevir

The Chemistry, Food & Drugs Division of the Trinidad & Tobago Ministry of Health approved the introduction of Telaprevir to the market, an innovative therapy that significantly increases the cure rate from Hepatitis C, and it is indicated for patients infected with the genotype 1 virus. Telaprevir is available in Trinidad under the trade brand INCIVO®. [More]
RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, "RI Defeats Hep C" that eliminating hepatitis c virus infection (hep c or HCV) is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities. [More]
Unique bacterial biomarkers may help develop diagnostics, treatments for liver cirrhosis

Unique bacterial biomarkers may help develop diagnostics, treatments for liver cirrhosis

ENTEROME Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of innovative disease management solutions based on a deep understanding of the gut microbiome, and with a strong focus on liver diseases, highlights the advanced online publication in Nature of a research paper describing the identification of a unique series of bacterial biomarkers that could provide new opportunities for the development of diagnostics and treatments for liver cirrhosis. [More]
EGPAF applauds new licensing agreement to improve access to HIV medication for children

EGPAF applauds new licensing agreement to improve access to HIV medication for children

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) applauds the new licensing agreement between the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) and Gilead Sciences, Inc. to improve access to tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF), a promising new HIV medication. [More]
MedMira adds three new rapid vertical flow tests to Multiplo product line

MedMira adds three new rapid vertical flow tests to Multiplo product line

MedMira, Inc. is expanding its Multiplo product line with the addition of three new multiplex tests that deliver instant, simultaneous, single-cartridge results for syphilis (TP), HIV, and hepatitis C. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Researchers examine association between ritual circumcision procedure and HSV-1 in infants

Researchers examine association between ritual circumcision procedure and HSV-1 in infants

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society found. [More]