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Safety and protocol measures for humanitarian volunteers in the Ebola epidemic

Safety and protocol measures for humanitarian volunteers in the Ebola epidemic

Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness Journal has released a novel, informative article that speaks to volunteers within the Ebola epidemic. The article, contributed by a consortium of Boston-based hospitals, is entitled Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak. [More]
Enhanced dental care reduces respiratory tract infection risk in ICU patients

Enhanced dental care reduces respiratory tract infection risk in ICU patients

New research shows vulnerable patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) who received enhanced oral care from a dentist were at significantly less risk for developing a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), like ventilator-associated pneumonia, during their stay. [More]
Minnesota hospitals, health systems develop coordinated strategy to care for Ebola patients

Minnesota hospitals, health systems develop coordinated strategy to care for Ebola patients

The Minnesota Hospital Association announced today that hospitals and health systems from around the state have developed a coordinated strategy to care for Ebola patients in Minnesota. Under the plan, all hospitals in the state will continue to be prepared to detect, isolate and initially care for suspected Ebola patients. [More]
US hospitals lack infection prevention staff, resources to fight Ebola

US hospitals lack infection prevention staff, resources to fight Ebola

Only 6 percent of U.S. hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at U.S. hospitals conducted October 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). [More]
Passengers from West Africa to start 3-week Ebola screening

Passengers from West Africa to start 3-week Ebola screening

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that any person flying into the USA from Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea will soon have to undergo daily Ebola monitoring for several weeks after their arrival. [More]
Human trial of second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate under way

Human trial of second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate under way

Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit. A novel approach—analyzing a patient's breath for key chemical compounds made by the infecting microbe—may help detect invasive aspergillosis, a fungal infection that is a leading cause of mortality in patients with compromised immune systems, according to a proof-of-concept study now online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Helping children understand Ebola

Helping children understand Ebola

It dominates the headlines and is striking fear and panic in many communities around the world, Ebola. The constant barrage of information and so much unknown can be especially difficult for children, making it all the more important for parents to help their kids feel safe and to have a dialogue with them at the appropriate developmental level. [More]
ADI develops ELISA test kits for detection of Ebola viral protein antibodies

ADI develops ELISA test kits for detection of Ebola viral protein antibodies

San Antonio, Texas-based Biotech Company Alpha Diagnostic Int'l has developed and released several convenient, rapid, and sensitive ELISA test kits for the detection of major Ebola viral protein antibodies (Glycoprotein, GP; Nucleoprotein, NP, and Viral Protein 40 or VP40). [More]
Hospitals demand TRU-D SmartUVC device to be added to Ebola protocols

Hospitals demand TRU-D SmartUVC device to be added to Ebola protocols

Following the tragic infections of two hospital staff and subsequent tracking of hundreds of people related to Ebola, hospitals around the country are requiring TRU-D SmartUVC, a portable automated UVC disinfection robot which accurately measures required dosage, be added to Ebola protocols. [More]
Obeticholic acid drug shows promise against bile acid diarrhoea

Obeticholic acid drug shows promise against bile acid diarrhoea

A pilot study testing a new type of drug in patients with chronic diarrhoea has shown promising effects on reducing their symptoms. [More]
New PENTAX Medical i10 Series HD+ Endoscopes to be launched at ACG 2014

New PENTAX Medical i10 Series HD+ Endoscopes to be launched at ACG 2014

PENTAX Medical Company, a healthcare industry leader in endoscopic imaging, announced the U.S. and Canadian launch of PENTAX Medical i10 Series HD+ (plus) Endoscopes, devices that provide the highest resolution HD (high definition) images ever available for colonoscopy and gastroscopy procedures that screen for and treat GI disorders. [More]
CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

CHLA physician discusses urological issues in children

Children's Hospital Los Angeles physician-scientist Roger E. De Filippo, MD, an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health. [More]
Tablet screening app can improve eye health outcomes in remote, underserved communities

Tablet screening app can improve eye health outcomes in remote, underserved communities

Using a tablet screening app could prove to be an effective method to aid in the effort to reduce the incidence of avoidable blindness in populations at high-risk for glaucoma with limited access to health care, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Infection with herpes simplex virus increases Alzheimer's risk

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases Alzheimer's risk

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia. [More]
RegeneRx to begin RGN-259 Phase 3 trials for treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy

RegeneRx to begin RGN-259 Phase 3 trials for treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy

RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. ("the Company" or "RegeneRx") today announced that it met with the FDA in September and as a result of the meeting may begin Phase 3 to evaluate RGN-259 preservative-free eye drops for the treatment of patients with neurotrophic keratopathy (NK), an orphan disease of the cornea. [More]
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Study on blind cave fish could reveal mechanisms behind eye disease, other human ailments

Study on blind cave fish could reveal mechanisms behind eye disease, other human ailments

Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit to teach us about the causes of many human ailments, including those that result in loss of sight. [More]
New findings could help develop antibiotics with lower risk of resistance

New findings could help develop antibiotics with lower risk of resistance

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics – a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. [More]
New corneal inlay device offers potential treatment option for presbyopia

New corneal inlay device offers potential treatment option for presbyopia

A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]