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ESC publishes new guidelines on pericardial diseases

ESC publishes new guidelines on pericardial diseases

New ESC Guidelines on pericardial diseases are published today. Until now there was insufficient evidence for strong recommendations in this group of conditions which can severely restrict quality of life. [More]
New ESC Guidelines on infective endocarditis support role of imaging in diagnosis

New ESC Guidelines on infective endocarditis support role of imaging in diagnosis

ESC Guidelines published today on infective endocarditis boost the role of imaging in diagnosis of this deadly disease. [More]
Novel chemical virus can cross double lipid layer surrounding cells to release drugs

Novel chemical virus can cross double lipid layer surrounding cells to release drugs

Viruses are able to redirect the functioning of cells in order to infect them. Inspired by their mode of action, scientists from the CNRS and Université de Strasbourg have designed a "chemical virus" that can cross the double lipid layer that surrounds cells, and then disintegrate in the intracellular medium in order to release active compounds. [More]
Oysters play important role in persistence and transmission of norovirus

Oysters play important role in persistence and transmission of norovirus

Oysters not only transmit human norovirus; they also serve as a major reservoir for these pathogens, according to research published August 28 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. "More than 80 percent of human norovirus genotypes were detected in oyster samples or oyster-related outbreaks," said corresponding author Yongjie Wang, PhD. [More]
Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health, in partnership with vaccine manufacturer PaxVax, Inc. is participating in a clinical study to test the effects of the oral typhoid vaccination, Vivotif (Typhoid Vaccine Live Oral Ty21a). The study will look at the side effects that could occur when taking Vivotif across the range of approved potencies. [More]
Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

While most primary care physicians responding to a survey taken in late 2014 and early 2015 expressed confidence in their ability to identify potential cases of Ebola and communicate Ebola risks to their patients, only 50 to 70 percent of them gave answers that fit with CDC guidelines when asked how they would care for hypothetical patients who might have been exposed to Ebola. [More]
Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year — mainly those with impaired immune systems due to AIDS, cancer treatment or an organ transplant. [More]
Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV leads to development of AIDS

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have revealed that HIV does not cause AIDS by the virus's direct effect on the host's immune cells, but rather through the cells' lethal influence on one another. [More]
Research: Mechanisms behind bacterial warfare could be harnessed to target pathogenic bacteria

Research: Mechanisms behind bacterial warfare could be harnessed to target pathogenic bacteria

Two UC Santa Barbara graduate students have demonstrated how certain microbes exploit proteins in nearby bacteria to deliver toxins and kill them. [More]
Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

More than a cause of a simple infection, viruses are often involved in the development of serious diseases. Such is the case with liver cancer, which often develops in an organ that has been weakened by hepatitis B or C virus. [More]
Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Compared with routine medical care, probiotics administered to critically ill patients in intensive care units showed no benefit in preventing the colonization of drug-resistant microbes in the intestinal tract, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]

Researchers reveal HIV testing trends among older adults

Researchers led by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health examined HIV testing trends among adults ages 50 through 64 both before and after 2006, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that most doctors automatically screen all patients for HIV regardless of whether they have symptoms. [More]
Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Every organism--from a seedling to a president--must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery. [More]
Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are still prescribing valuable malaria medicines to patients who do not have malaria, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
Study sheds further light on the way APOL1 protein kills trypanosmoe

Study sheds further light on the way APOL1 protein kills trypanosmoe

The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is a blood parasite capable of infecting many mammals. Humans are provided with natural immunity against infection through the activity of the protein apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1): captured via endocytosis, APOL1 forms pores in the lysosomal membrane, leading to the death of the trypanosome. [More]
Breakthrough approach saves patient's eyes and life from flesh-eating disease

Breakthrough approach saves patient's eyes and life from flesh-eating disease

The National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation today announced that a patient's eyes—and life—were saved by doctors at Vanderbilt University Hospital in Nashville, TN, working with NNFF, NovaBay Pharmaceuticals and Dr. John Crew, director of the Advanced Wound Care Center at Seton Medical Center in Daly City, CA. [More]

Sigma-Aldrich signs agreement with PHE to manufacture, supply bacterial and fungal NCTC/NCPF CRMs

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, a leading Life Science and Technology Company, today announced it has signed an agreement with Public Health England to manufacture and supply bacterial and fungal NCTC/NCPF Certified Reference Materials (CRM) in LENTICULE disc format worldwide for use as controls in food, water, environmental and clinical testing microbiology laboratories. [More]
Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy has risen by more than six years since 1990 as healthy life expectancy grows; ischemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, and stroke cause the most health loss around the world. [More]
Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

An oral cholera vaccine that is in short supply could treat more people and save more lives in crisis situations, if one dose were dispensed instead of the recommended two, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Yale study identifies new barrier to caring for chronic hepatitis C patients

Yale study identifies new barrier to caring for chronic hepatitis C patients

Nearly one in four patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) are denied initial approval for a drug therapy that treats the most common strain of the infection, according to a Yale School of Medicine study. [More]
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