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Researchers aim to improve current procedures for predicting outcome of prostate cancer

Researchers aim to improve current procedures for predicting outcome of prostate cancer

Researchers are working to find a way to determine how serious prostate cancer is when first diagnosed to avoid unnecessary treatments, which can cause life long side effects and even death. [More]
Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Recent years have brought more attention to the role of carbohydrates in our diets and the differences between healthy and unhealthy carbs, most often in the context of weight control. A new study highlights one more reason to avoid sugary beverages, processed foods and other energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods—cutting them may help reduce your risk of cancer. [More]
Prostatic artery embolization improves sleep, quality of life for men with enlarged prostates

Prostatic artery embolization improves sleep, quality of life for men with enlarged prostates

An innovative interventional radiology treatment for men with enlarged prostates decreases the number of times they wake to urinate in the night, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting. Researchers said the majority of men with enlarged prostates and lower urinary tract symptoms reported better sleep that resulted in an improved quality of life after they underwent a treatment called prostatic artery embolization (PAE). [More]
Apple body shape linked to higher heart risk than pear-shape in diabetics

Apple body shape linked to higher heart risk than pear-shape in diabetics

People with type 1 or 2 diabetes who have apple-shaped bodies with excessive fat around the abdomen and stomach, can be at higher risk of serious heart disease than patients with pear-shaped figures who store excess fat around their hips, according to a new study from Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and John Hopkins University. [More]
Testosterone therapy helps reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events in elderly men

Testosterone therapy helps reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events in elderly men

A new multi-year study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that testosterone therapy helped elderly men with low testosterone levels and pre-existing coronary artery disease reduce their risks of major adverse cardiovascular events — including strokes, heart attacks, and death. [More]
One in 10 people in UK believed to be vitamin B12 deficient

One in 10 people in UK believed to be vitamin B12 deficient

One in 10 people in the UK are believed to be deficient in vitamin B12 – that’s an astonishing six million people suffering from the consequences of having less than the optimum amount of B12 in their system. [More]
Understanding idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an interview with Michael Durheim, M.D.

Understanding idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an interview with Michael Durheim, M.D.

IPF is a rare and fatal lung disease that causes permanent scarring of the lungs, leading to debilitating shortness of breath and cough in affected patients. It affects as many as 132,000 Americans, most commonly those over the age of 65. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
Over a third of people in UK and US will be obese by 2025

Over a third of people in UK and US will be obese by 2025

A recent analysis of body mass index (BMI) around the world has revealed a startling increase in the prevalence of obesity. The number of obese people worldwide increased from 105 million in 1975 to 641 million in 2014. [More]
Experimental urine test identifies 92% of men with elevated PSA levels

Experimental urine test identifies 92% of men with elevated PSA levels

An experimental urine test that detects genetic changes associated with prostate cancer identified 92 percent of men with elevated PSA (prostate-specific antigen) levels who had high-grade cancers, according to a study published today in JAMA Oncology online. [More]
Study finds correlation between male sex hormones and oral health

Study finds correlation between male sex hormones and oral health

More than 20 species of macaques, the most widely distributed nonhuman primates in the world, socialize in lively troops and make frequent appearances on National Geographic documentaries. But, what can we learn from one of our closest primate relatives about our own oral health? [More]
Research on multiple sexual behaviors among men is lacking

Research on multiple sexual behaviors among men is lacking

Sexual health research focused on men who have sex with men is lacking, according to health researchers, even in the midst of rising rates of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, in this population. [More]
New sensor 1 million times more sensitive than current methods developed to help detect cancers earlier

New sensor 1 million times more sensitive than current methods developed to help detect cancers earlier

Physicists and engineers at Case Western Reserve University have developed an optical sensor, based on nanostructured metamaterials, that's 1 million times more sensitive than the current best available--one capable of identifying a single lightweight molecule in a highly dilute solution. [More]
High levels of radiation dosage may not improve survival of prostate cancer patients

High levels of radiation dosage may not improve survival of prostate cancer patients

New technology has enabled doctors to administer higher doses of radiation to prostate cancer patients with fewer side effects. However, a new study shows that escalating the dose may not actually help a patient in the long term, at least not patients with localized prostate cancer. The results were published online last week in the American Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Fertility goes down when cost of achieving social status goes up

Fertility goes down when cost of achieving social status goes up

Competition for social status may be an important driver of lower fertility in the modern world, suggests a new study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. [More]
Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth. [More]
UC Berkeley biologists discover potential target for unisex contraceptives

UC Berkeley biologists discover potential target for unisex contraceptives

UC Berkeley biologists have discovered the switch that triggers the power kick sperm use to penetrate and fertilize a human egg, uncovering a possible source of male infertility but also a potential target for contraceptives that work in both men and women. [More]
Tough men more likely to ignore medical problems

Tough men more likely to ignore medical problems

Men are less likely than women to go to the doctor, more likely to choose a male doctor when they do go, but less likely to be honest with that doctor about their symptoms, Rutgers psychologists have found. The researchers believe this may contribute to men's dying earlier than women. [More]
Scientists provide overview of most promising compounds to combat prostate cancer

Scientists provide overview of most promising compounds to combat prostate cancer

Scientists from MIPT (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology), MSU (Moscow State University), and National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” provided an overview of the most promising compounds which can be used as medications for prostate cancer. [More]
Female childhood cancer survivors have a good chance of conceiving

Female childhood cancer survivors have a good chance of conceiving

A new study examines fertility issues in male and female childhood cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy. The study found that while most female survivors still have a good chance of conceiving, male survivors are significantly less likely to father children. [More]
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