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French study investigates how woman's shoe heels influence men's behavior

If it's help a woman needs, maybe she should wear high heels. That's the message from Nicolas Guéguen of the Université de Bretagne-Sud in France, after he observed how helpful men are towards women in high heels versus those wearing flat, sensible shoes. [More]
2014 expected to be a banner year for brewed and RTD tea sales in the US

2014 expected to be a banner year for brewed and RTD tea sales in the US

Tea is the world's second most-consumed beverage after water. According to a new report published in the current issue of HerbalEGram — the American Botanical Council's (ABC) monthly online magazine — sales of loose, bagged, concentrated, and herbal tea in the United States increased by 5.9% in 2013, reaching a total of $1,751,055,302. [More]

New laser technology accurately detects leaks in biogas plants

There are nearly 8,000 biogas plants today in Germany. They use biomass-derived gas to generate electricity and heat. [More]
NJIT, Drexel and Rowan join forces to tackle water problems in the region

NJIT, Drexel and Rowan join forces to tackle water problems in the region

Water experts at NJIT, Drexel University and Rowan University are joining forces to tackle the increasingly complex challenges affecting water resources in the region, from shrinking supplies, to industrial contamination, to climate change. [More]

U-M student researchers complete Detroit's first comprehensive inventory of greenhouse gas emissions

Energy use in buildings accounts for nearly two-thirds of the greenhouse gas emissions generated in Detroit, while exhaust from cars, trucks and buses is responsible for about 30 percent of the total, according to a new citywide inventory compiled by University of Michigan student researchers. [More]

Ultra-light architecture technology set to revolutionize architecture, construction

A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed Cloud Arch, an innovative, ultra-light architecture that will revolutionize the way large open public spaces, such as market, airport, stadium, concert hall, factory, are built. [More]

Artful Steps to hold art exhibit featuring the work of people with developmental disabilities

Artful Steps, in collaboration with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), proudly announces a group art exhibit featuring the work of people with developmental disabilities. [More]
California's drought linked to human-caused climate change, say Stanford scientists

California's drought linked to human-caused climate change, say Stanford scientists

The atmospheric conditions associated with the unprecedented drought currently afflicting California are "very likely" linked to human-caused climate change, Stanford scientists say. [More]
Emergency or disaster preparedness begins at home

Emergency or disaster preparedness begins at home

Preparedness for an emergency or disaster begins at home. That's the message officials are trying to convey during September, which is National Preparedness Month. [More]

ANSYS, Modelon partner to revolutionize product development

ANSYS and Modelon have entered an agreement to revolutionize product development – reducing late-stage integration failures, decreasing product development costs and speeding time to market. [More]

VAPE Holdings adds new line of products to its HIVE brand

Vape Holdings, Inc. (the "Company"), a holding company focused on providing healthy, efficient, and sustainable vaporization products, is pleased to announce the newest line of products under the HIVE brand, HIVE GLASS, which is set to release on or before December 1, 2014. [More]

Study finds considerable gap between economic loss and compensation after Hebei Spirit oil spill

Although nearly eight years have passed since a major oil spill in South Korea, compensation and recovery efforts appear to be far from satisfactory, and the affected communities continue to suffer the effects of the disaster. [More]

Scientists explore reason behind major comeback of underwater grasses

The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses near the mouth of the Susquehanna River, virtually disappeared from the upper Chesapeake Bay after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. [More]

Southwest U.S. may experience a decade-long drought, say scientists

Due to global warming, scientists say, the chances of the southwestern United States experiencing a decade long drought is at least 50 percent, and the chances of a "megadrought" - one that lasts over 30 years - ranges from 20 to 50 percent over the next century. [More]

UTSA researcher to create computer models to produce sustainable food security in the region

Eric Jing Du, assistant professor of Construction Science in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Architecture, has been awarded major funding from the National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Behavioral and Social Science Research Program to complete a four-year research project about food security issues in West Africa using real-time simulation computer models. [More]

Study: Mercury in the global ocean poses dangers to humans and environment

Although the days of odd behavior among hat makers are a thing of the past, the dangers mercury poses to humans and the environment persist today. [More]

NASA selects Arizona State University to design and oversee Mastcam-Z imaging investigation

Arizona State University has been selected by NASA to design, deliver and oversee the Mastcam-Z imaging investigation, a pair of color panoramic zoom cameras, on the next rover mission to be launched to the surface of Mars in 2020. [More]
Marine pest may pave way for novel anti-fouling coatings for maritime industry, biomedicine

Marine pest may pave way for novel anti-fouling coatings for maritime industry, biomedicine

A team of biologists, led by Clemson University associate professor Andrew S. Mount, performed cutting-edge research on a marine pest that will pave the way for novel anti-fouling paint for ships and boats and also improve bio-adhesives for medical and industrial applications. [More]

Scientists tap old secrets to develop environmentally friendly way to make colored plastics

Long before humans figured out how to create colors, nature had already perfected the process - think stunning, bright butterfly wings of many different hues, for example. Now scientists are tapping into those secrets to develop a more environmentally friendly way to make colored plastics. Their paper on using structure - or the shapes and architectures of materials - rather than dyes, to produce color appears in the ACS journal Nano Letters. [More]
Environmental experts gather at EPA forum to discuss sediment removal plan for Passaic River

Environmental experts gather at EPA forum to discuss sediment removal plan for Passaic River

Environmental cleanup experts gathered at NJIT this week for an all-day public forum on a $1.7 billion proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to dredge toxic sediment from an eight-mile stretch of the lower Passaic River. [More]