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News Medical's "Thought Leaders" series is a selection of articles written by national and international experts and trusted advisers in health and medicine. All the articles are written by experts who have been invited as recognised leaders in their fields to provide a "state of the art" contribution.
Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

In our latest report – The Battle for Breath – the impact of lung disease in the UK, figures suggest that 1 in 5 (around 12.7 million) have been diagnosed with a lung condition in the UK. If you’re over the age of 70, this rises to 1 in 3. [More]
Neutrons key to discovering new HIV drugs? An interview with Dr Matthew Blakeley

Neutrons key to discovering new HIV drugs? An interview with Dr Matthew Blakeley

Neutron crystallography allows us to determine the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, by means of the diffraction of neutrons from the regularly spaced atoms of a crystal. [More]
Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

SIDS is the sudden and unexpected death of a baby, which usually occurs during sleep. The great majority of the babies are aged between about two weeks and seven or eight months. [More]
Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Zoonotic diseases are diseases or infections which are naturally transmissible from animals to humans, as defined in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. [More]
Menopause symptoms: can a healthcare professional help? An interview with Dr Heather Currie

Menopause symptoms: can a healthcare professional help? An interview with Dr Heather Currie

The survey showed that only 50% of women consulted a healthcare professional about their symptoms, despite the fact that many women said their symptoms were having a significant effect on their work life, social life, home life and sex life. [More]
Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

“IDPs” is now a widely used acronym that stands for “intrinsically disordered proteins.” It is the term generally used by the scientific community to refer to a wide variety of proteins that do not have a stable 3D structure and are instead characterized by a high extent of local mobility, disorder and many conformers that are accessible at room temperature. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
Unseen health risks of aortic stenosis: an interview with Dr Shelley Rahman Haley

Unseen health risks of aortic stenosis: an interview with Dr Shelley Rahman Haley

Aortic stenosis means narrowing of the aortic valve, which is the out flow valve from the left ventricle, the pumping chamber of the heart. This is the valve which opens to allow blood to flood out of the heart and all-round the body. [More]
Zika protection whilst traveling: an interview with Dr Crystal Aguh

Zika protection whilst traveling: an interview with Dr Crystal Aguh

The majority of the countries that are affected by the Zika virus are in the Caribbean. Many of the Caribbean Islands, including large islands such as Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Barbados and US Virgin Islands, as well as Mexico and other countries in Central and South America are affected. [More]
How can we defeat drug resistance? An interview with Dr Grania Brigden

How can we defeat drug resistance? An interview with Dr Grania Brigden

The O’Neill report is a wide ranging report recognising anti-microbial resistance (AMR) as a global problem with major public health and economic significance. [More]
Using spectral imaging to study brain tumors in 3D: an interview Dr Cyril Petibois

Using spectral imaging to study brain tumors in 3D: an interview Dr Cyril Petibois

I’m a biophysicist at the University of Bordeaux and I mainly work on bio-imaging methods in the cancer laboratory research facility, mostly for brain cancers. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Unlocking the first gene to cause otosclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Holme

Unlocking the first gene to cause otosclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Holme

Otosclerosis is a common cause of hearing loss, particularly amongst young adults. It normally starts in their 20s or 30s and it affects about 1 in 200 hundred people. In the UK, about 300,000 people are affected by the condition. [More]
Cryptococcus research: an interview with Associate Professor Kirsten Nielsen

Cryptococcus research: an interview with Associate Professor Kirsten Nielsen

Cryptococcus is a fungus found in the environment throughout the world that is able to cause disease in humans. While most fungal pathogens don’t receive as much press as their bacterial or viral counterparts, they can be just as deadly. [More]
Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

We actually normally refer to this as whole-specimen imaging of breast tissue. What we mean is that when tissue is removed from the breast, which could be in the form of a lumpectomy – a breast-conserving surgery – or a mastectomy, the piece of tissue removed is relatively large. [More]
Could a new test improve bowel cancer screening uptake? An interview with Professor Halloran

Could a new test improve bowel cancer screening uptake? An interview with Professor Halloran

The most recent complete data for England (2014/15) shows an average uptake of the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood Tests (gFOBT) from those invited by the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) of 58.22%. [More]
Could worm infection counter IBD? An interview with Dr Loke and Dr Cadwell

Could worm infection counter IBD? An interview with Dr Loke and Dr Cadwell

The hygiene hypothesis refers to the idea that decreased exposure to certain infectious agents (because of better hygiene) is the reason why we have seen an increase in inflammatory diseases in the developed world. [More]
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
Could oral supplements affect teenage behavior? An interview with Prof. Stein and Dr Tammam

Could oral supplements affect teenage behavior? An interview with Prof. Stein and Dr Tammam

We wanted to see whether supplementing the diet of disadvantaged adolescents with the omega 3 polyunsaturated acids, EPA & DHA, vitamins and minerals over a school term might improve their antisocial behaviour, which usually gets worse during a term. [More]
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