Thought Leaders RSS Feed - Thought Leaders

News Medical's "Thought Leaders" series is a selection of articles written by national and international experts and trusted advisers in health and medicine. All the articles are written by experts who have been invited as recognised leaders in their fields to provide a "state of the art" contribution.
Acne: when to seek help?

Acne: when to seek help?

Acne develops due to an interplay between genetic factors (so people often have a family history) and hormonal factors that can increase the size and activity of the sebaceous or oil gland. [More]
Metabolomics research at the Phenome Centre Birmingham

Metabolomics research at the Phenome Centre Birmingham

The new Phenome Centre Birmingham is an eight-million-pound research facility that has been funded by the Medical Research Council, by the University of Birmingham, and by four industry partners, namely, Beckman Coulter, Bruker, ThermoFisher Scientific and Waters. It is a clinical phenotyping centre. [More]
Improving innovation uptake in the NHS

Improving innovation uptake in the NHS

I think innovation is one of those rather slippery terms that means different things to different people. First of all, I would make a distinction between innovations that are essentially about a new, physical product and innovations that are more to do with services or processes. [More]
NTM lung infections

NTM lung infections

Nontuberculous mycobacteria are part of a group of bacteria called mycobacteria. The non-tuberculous mycobacteria are, as the name suggests, mycobacteria that are not tuberculosis. They're also not leprosy, but they are the other members of the bacteria group termed mycobacteria. [More]
Finding reliable health information online: an interview with Dr Andrew Boyden

Finding reliable health information online: an interview with Dr Andrew Boyden

The research was presented by pharmacists from the Calvary Public Hospital in Canberra, who looked at conversations that took place in selected parenting groups on Facebook. [More]
Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which causes about 1,100 cases of bowel cancer and 1,000 other cancers annually in the UK. It is caused by a fault in the mismatch repair gene (MMR) which usually works to prevent cancer. [More]
Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

The first thing that is important to stress is that this is an area that we actually know very little about. What we generally think, rather than know, is that NTM has a lot in common with pulmonary tuberculosis. [More]
Elucidating IDP behaviour on crowded membranes

Elucidating IDP behaviour on crowded membranes

IDPs are proteins that contain stretches of amino-acid sequence that are flexible and do not comprise stable structure in isolation. This is in contrast with a more traditional view of proteins as largely occupying a stable native structure that correlates with functions such as enzyme activity or binding. [More]
Using urine samples to diagnose disease in preterm newborns

Using urine samples to diagnose disease in preterm newborns

The majority of patients in neonatal intensive care units are premature babies, who often have infectious (congenital pneumonia) or noninfectious (tachypnea, infant respiratory distress syndrome) respiratory pathologies. [More]
Brain plasticity after injury: an interview with Dr Swathi Kiran

Brain plasticity after injury: an interview with Dr Swathi Kiran

Brain plasticity is the phenomenon by which the brain can rewire and reorganize itself in response to changing stimulus input. Brain plasticity is at play when one is learning new information (at school) or learning a new language... [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
Reducing contamination rates in urine samples: an interview with Prof. Frank Chinegwundoh MBE

Reducing contamination rates in urine samples: an interview with Prof. Frank Chinegwundoh MBE

Contamination is thought to be a significant problem. Depending on which study you look at, the rates of urine contamination can be 17% or upwards. The standard method of midstream urine collection is for the healthcare professional... [More]
Does music improve child brain development?

Does music improve child brain development?

We are a research group at the Brain and Creativity Institute at University of Southern California. In 2012, we began a five-year longitudinal study in collaboration with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and their Youth Orchestra program at the Heart of Los Angeles (YOLA at HOLA). [More]
An inclusive approach to COPD research: an interview with Dr David Leather

An inclusive approach to COPD research: an interview with Dr David Leather

About eight years ago the WHO put out a call saying that we needed data that better represented real world patients. Our ambition was to create evidence earlier in the life cycle of medicine that better represented the population that would... [More]
Behavioral activation as effective as CBT? An interview with Professor David Richards

Behavioral activation as effective as CBT? An interview with Professor David Richards

BA and CBT are quite fundamentally different. BA is what we call an outside-in treatment, which means it focuses on helping people with depression change the way in which they behave. [More]
Diabetes diagnosis linked to cancer development?

Diabetes diagnosis linked to cancer development?

There are many studies that support a link between type 2 diabetes and risk of cancer. The relationship is complex and multifactorial. [More]
Can vitamin D reduce asthma attacks? An interview with Professor Adrian Martineau

Can vitamin D reduce asthma attacks? An interview with Professor Adrian Martineau

In the past vitamin D was just thought to be important in regulating calcium homeostasis and bone health as vitamin D deficiency is best known for causing rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. [More]
Does exercise eliminate the ill effects of sitting? An interview with Prof. Ulf Ekelund

Does exercise eliminate the ill effects of sitting? An interview with Prof. Ulf Ekelund

In short, the detrimental effects of sitting for prolonged hours can be divided into acute, or short-term, and long-term effects. [More]
Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

My research lab studies several classes of systems. We are mostly interested in looking at large protein assemblies to understand their structure, dynamics and how their properties relate to their malfunction in disease. [More]
Gender matching key for corneal transplants? An interview with Professor Kaye

Gender matching key for corneal transplants? An interview with Professor Kaye

The cornea is a transparent tissue lining the front of the eye, that is invisible tissue to the naked eye. It is a delicate tissue and disease or injury may lead to a loss of transparency or a change in the shape of the cornea, resulting in severe visual impairment. [More]
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