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News Medical's "Thought Leaders" series is a selection of articles written by national and international experts and trusted advisers in health and medicine. All the articles are written by experts who have been invited as recognised leaders in their fields to provide a "state of the art" contribution.
Deaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHME

Deaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHME

The study showed that about thirty percent to maybe half of the leading causes of death in the world are preventable. These are risk factors that you could manage and thus you could prevent a lot of premature deaths. [More]
Charles Bonnet syndrome: an interview with Dr. Dominic ffytche

Charles Bonnet syndrome: an interview with Dr. Dominic ffytche

Charles Bonnet syndrome is the name we give to the visual hallucinations associated with eye disease. There are lots of different causes of visual hallucinations. Many different medical problems and medications can cause them, but, when the cause is eye disease, it's referred to as Charles Bonnet Syndrome after Charles Bonnet, who was a natural philosopher in the 18th century. [More]
Liposomal sizing and the Coulter principle: an interview with Professor Melvin E. Klegerman

Liposomal sizing and the Coulter principle: an interview with Professor Melvin E. Klegerman

For about the last 25 years, the cardiology group here have been developing a platform technology for both the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis. The group began at Northwestern University, Chicago, under the direction of Dr. David McPherson and he continues to lead the group. [More]
Cancer diagnosis improvements in England: an interview with Lucy Elliss-Brookes

Cancer diagnosis improvements in England: an interview with Lucy Elliss-Brookes

The ‘two week wait’ referral was brought into England in 2000. If a patient goes to see their GP and they meet specific criteria that cause the GP to think they might have cancer, then they should be referred to see a specialist within two weeks. [More]
Melatonin and the circadian rhythm: an interview with Professor Kennaway, University of Adelaide

Melatonin and the circadian rhythm: an interview with Professor Kennaway, University of Adelaide

The production of melatonin is controlled by a part of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and its timing fine-tuned by our exposure to light during the morning. [More]
How important is a mother’s diet before pregnancy? An interview with Dr Matt Silver

How important is a mother’s diet before pregnancy? An interview with Dr Matt Silver

In humans, much is already known about the impact of maternal undernutrition during pregnancy, and its impact on growth, development and disease throughout the life course. However, until recently little was known about the effects of the nutritional environment around the time of conception. [More]
Jumping genes: a marker for early cancer diagnosis? An interview with Dr Kazazian

Jumping genes: a marker for early cancer diagnosis? An interview with Dr Kazazian

In the genome of every human being, there are about 80-100 active LINE-1s that are capable of mobilizing by a copy and paste mechanism to a new location in the genome. [More]
Unlocking the genes behind antibiotic resistance: an interview with Professor Romesberg

Unlocking the genes behind antibiotic resistance: an interview with Professor Romesberg

Bacteria are very, very diverse. This is why their susceptibility to different antibiotics can be very different. It also makes the tools they have to evolve resistance in many cases different. [More]
Brain health: how can you reduce cognitive decline? An interview with Heather Snyder, Ph.D.

Brain health: how can you reduce cognitive decline? An interview with Heather Snyder, Ph.D.

Reader’s Digest and the Alzheimer’s Association partnered to survey approximately 1,600 people in May 2015 about their brain health and their knowledge of how lifestyle habits affect cognitive decline and dementia. [More]
Pipetting solutions for sample screening: an interview with Christina Thomas

Pipetting solutions for sample screening: an interview with Christina Thomas

Hi my name is Christina Thomas, we're here at the Institute of Clinical Chemistry in Munich. Our research focuses on interleukin 1 and the inflammasome and their role in innate immunity and inflammation. [More]
Using whole genomes data to improve bowel cancer diagnosis: an interview with Professor Ian Tomlinson

Using whole genomes data to improve bowel cancer diagnosis: an interview with Professor Ian Tomlinson

The project aims to sequence the specified 100,000 genomes from two types of patients: first, those who may have rare inherited diseases caused by unknown or unidentified genes; and second, people with one of several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. [More]
Why do we sleep? An interview with Professor Wisden

Why do we sleep? An interview with Professor Wisden

It is true that we still do not know why we need to sleep every night. Sleep is essential for health. We have to do it every day. But nobody yet knows why. This fact amazes me. [More]
Antibiotic resistance awareness: an interview with Professor Colin Garner

Antibiotic resistance awareness: an interview with Professor Colin Garner

The threat of antibiotic resistance is very real. It is estimated that 700,000 people die each from resistant infections. In Europe the figure is 25,000 deaths and a similar number in the USA. [More]
Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease is an inherited disease which, whilst quite rare, is one of the more common inherited neurodegenerative diseases. About 1 in 6,000 people in the UK are at risk and what’s horrible about this disease is that if one of your parents has it, then you have a fifty-fifty chance of inheriting it. [More]
Diagnosing traumatic brain injury through a blood test: an interview with Dr Korley

Diagnosing traumatic brain injury through a blood test: an interview with Dr Korley

The severity of traumatic brain injury is currently crudely classified as mild, moderate or severe. However, often patients referred to as mild have debilitating symptoms that are not “mild”. Additionally, there are patients currently classified as moderate or severe who regain their pre-injury functional status whereas others don’t. [More]
Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

SUDEP is the sudden unexpected witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic and non-drowning death in people with epilepsy, with or without evidence of a seizure. It doesn’t necessarily have to be in the known context of a seizure, excluding documented status epilepticus, where people have seizure after seizure. [More]
Determining the dynein-dynactin complex structure: an interview with Dr Gabriel C. Lander

Determining the dynein-dynactin complex structure: an interview with Dr Gabriel C. Lander

This is a macromolecular assembly is made up of two components, dynein and dynactin, that works to move molecular cargo (organelles, RNA, vesicles, proteins, viruses) along microtubule highways within our cells. [More]
DISC-1: schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene? An interview with Professor Kevin Fox

DISC-1: schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene? An interview with Professor Kevin Fox

The DISC-1 gene has been studied intensively over the years because people with mutations in DISC1 have a high likelihood of mental illness. DISC-1 was known to be associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major clinical depression and autism. [More]
Laser eye surgery: a glimpse into the future - An interview with Professor Dan Reinstein

Laser eye surgery: a glimpse into the future - An interview with Professor Dan Reinstein

LASIK (Laser In Situ Keratomileusis) creates a hinged flap with a microkeratome and evaporating corneal tissue under the flap with an excimer laser. However, the concept that refractive error could be corrected by sculpting corneal stromal tissue to change corneal curvature was the brainchild of Jose Ignacio Barraquer Moner in 1948. [More]
BRCA gene mutations and ovarian cancer: an interview with Dr Matulonis, Harvard Medical School

BRCA gene mutations and ovarian cancer: an interview with Dr Matulonis, Harvard Medical School

The BRCA gene encodes for the BRCA proteins, BRCA1 and BRCA2. These proteins are very important in repairing DNA, which they do by correcting double-stranded breaks. [More]
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