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News Medical's "Thought Leaders" series is a selection of articles written by national and international experts and trusted advisers in health and medicine. All the articles are written by experts who have been invited as recognised leaders in their fields to provide a "state of the art" contribution.
Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis, also known as scleroderma, is a rare disease characterized by the thickening and scarring of connective tissue of multiple organs in the body [More]
Psychological difficulties of ovarian cancer: an interview with Katherine Taylor

Psychological difficulties of ovarian cancer: an interview with Katherine Taylor

Ovarian cancer affects around 7000 thousand women in the UK every year and very sadly the outcomes are not great. A women dies every 2 hours of ovarian cancer. If I am diagnosed today, I’ve only got a 40% chance of being alive in 5 years’ time. [More]
Unlocking H5N1 virus replication: an interview with Martin Blackledge

Unlocking H5N1 virus replication: an interview with Martin Blackledge

We were able to show that one small domain of the polymerase, the part that is essential for entry of a piece of the polymerase into the cell nucleus, changes its conformation to allow it to interact with the transporter protein than takes it into the nucleus. [More]
Preventing the spread of Zika: an interview with Professor John Oxford

Preventing the spread of Zika: an interview with Professor John Oxford

The link between the Zika virus and Guillain-Barré on the one hand, and pregnancy and the virus affecting the fetus in terms of microcephaly on the other, is still not confirmed conclusively. [More]
Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

In around 2004, there was a Phillips paper that discussed a new imaging technique called MPI. At that time, I had an eager, promising graduate student named Matt Ferguson who wanted a project, so I asked him to take a look. [More]
Are we ageing healthily? An interview with Professor Carol Jagger

Are we ageing healthily? An interview with Professor Carol Jagger

This is the million dollar question but it is hard to give a definite answer. Most data on trends in life and healthy life expectancy use surveys that do not include people in care homes which can skew results at older ages. [More]
MOOCs: the future of healthcare training? An interview with David Robertshaw

MOOCs: the future of healthcare training? An interview with David Robertshaw

MOOCs are short, free courses run by major learning providers to share their knowledge of a particular academic topic or to help students develop a specific skill. [More]
Does simulated based training bring better value healthcare? An interview with Prof Sir Muir Gray, Former Chief Knowledge Officer of the NHS

Does simulated based training bring better value healthcare? An interview with Prof Sir Muir Gray, Former Chief Knowledge Officer of the NHS

We have to think of the world that we are leaving, the world we are moving into. The last fifty years in healthcare, have seen the advent of hip replacement, cardiac bypass, systematic reviews. But at the end of fifty years, every country is facing five problems. [More]
How to avoid breast damage when exercising: an interview with Professor Joanna Scurr

How to avoid breast damage when exercising: an interview with Professor Joanna Scurr

The breast itself doesn't contain any muscles and the only 2 supporting structures are the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments. Both of those structures are quite weak mechanically so they're not able to hold the breast in place firmly. [More]
Is breast density really linked to breast cancer risk? An interview with Dr Wenlian Zhu

Is breast density really linked to breast cancer risk? An interview with Dr Wenlian Zhu

Breast is composed of fatty and dense glandular and fibrous tissues. Breast density is expressed as the fraction of a mammogram occupied by dense tissues. [More]
Revealing dynamic protein complexes with NMR: an interview with Elisar Barbar

Revealing dynamic protein complexes with NMR: an interview with Elisar Barbar

In my lab, we focus on understanding structure, assembly and regulation of the LC8 protein interaction network, the array of LC8 interactions with diverse partners which affect multiple cellular functions in biomedical systems. [More]
Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

I'm a professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. I have been performing NMR research on proteins for nearly 40 years. [More]
Duchenne muscular dystrophy: direct effect on muscle stem cells? An interview with Dr Rudnicki

Duchenne muscular dystrophy: direct effect on muscle stem cells? An interview with Dr Rudnicki

For twenty years, it has been understood that dystrophin is expressed in differentiated muscle fibers where it is part of a protein complex that crosses the membrane and connects the extracellular matrix to the actin network inside the cell to provide structural integrity. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

RNA is becoming an interesting drug target as it takes possible intervention back one step to the synthesis of a target protein, instead of trying to block or inhibit a process. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

While there are a range of reports that different foods and food groups can increase or decrease your risk of cancer, these associations are very difficult to scientifically verify. [More]
Using single-molecule studies to understand cellular processes: an interview with Professor W. E. Moerner

Using single-molecule studies to understand cellular processes: an interview with Professor W. E. Moerner

Single fluorescent molecules provide a local nanometer-sized probe of complex systems. We can measure the motion of the single molecule, use them to achieve imaging on a scale down to 20 nanometers, or we can infer aspects of the behaviour of the object under study by the details of the light that is emitted. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
Determining ectopeptidase activity: an interview with Professor Stephen Weber, University of Pittsburgh

Determining ectopeptidase activity: an interview with Professor Stephen Weber, University of Pittsburgh

The scope of the activity of neuropeptides is remarkably broad. For example, neuropeptides are involved in pain control, mood/depression/eating disorders, social and emotional behaviour, body weight, drug abuse, stress, reproduction, motor control, memory, and in maintaining neuronal health when they are stressed. [More]
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