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News Medical's "Thought Leaders" series is a selection of articles written by national and international experts and trusted advisers in health and medicine. All the articles are written by experts who have been invited as recognised leaders in their fields to provide a "state of the art" contribution.
Electronic cigarettes and smoking cessation: an interview with Professor Peter Hajek

Electronic cigarettes and smoking cessation: an interview with Professor Peter Hajek

The electronic cigarette has been invented by Chinese pharmacist Hon Lik in 2003. The rise in electronic cigarettes (EC) popularity was initially a grass root phenomenon. EC are estimated to be at least 95% safer than cigarettes and they appeal to smokers who cannot or do not want to stop smoking, but who want to reduce the risks smoking poses to their health. [More]
Genomics of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): an interview with Professor Thomas J. Giordano

Genomics of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): an interview with Professor Thomas J. Giordano

There are two types of thyroid cells and therefore there are two broad types of thyroid cancer. Medullary carcinoma is derived from parafollicular or C cells, whereas follicular cells give rise to several types of thyroid cancers. [More]
Using NMR to study influenza and TB: an interview with Dr. Tim Cross

Using NMR to study influenza and TB: an interview with Dr. Tim Cross

In this interview, Tim Cross, Director of the NMR and MRI programs at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida, talks about his research into protein structures in viruses and bacteria, and how the findings will affect medical research into disease prevention. [More]
Bronchial thermoplasty for severe asthma: an interview with Dr. Rob Niven

Bronchial thermoplasty for severe asthma: an interview with Dr. Rob Niven

Internationally, severe asthma is defined as anybody who is on maximum therapy, which has no measurable side effects, but still have symptoms of persistent asthma. In the UK, that effectively means people who require oral steroids for their asthma two or more times a year. [More]
NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

My research these days is generally classified as structural biology, although as I trained in chemistry. I specialize in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applied to biological problems. Our lab is very interested in studying mammalian proteins, particularly systems involved in cancer, in order to try to understand mechanisms to provide that information for our collaborators, and for the general knowledge of the community as well. [More]
Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

The biological mesoscale range includes biological structures that range from 10 to 100 nanometers (billionths of a meter). Structures in this size range include viruses, cellular organelles, large molecular complexes, and any other internal cellular environments within that range. [More]
Kidney failure predictors in adolescents: an interview with Dr. Per-Ola Sundin

Kidney failure predictors in adolescents: an interview with Dr. Per-Ola Sundin

Diabetes, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases as well as obesity are some of the markers of risk for kidney failure that we are aware of in adulthood. Markers of risk prior to adulthood for subsequent chronic kidney disease resulting in kidney failure are less well described. [More]
Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

NRTIs are compounds which were originally developed in the 1960s as anti-cancer agents. They are similar in structure to the bases which make up DNA, and it was hoped that they would interfere with DNA replication in fast-growing cancer cells, slowing down or stopping tumour growth. [More]
Saatchi Bill: an interview with Dr. David Collingridge, Editor-in-Chief, The Lancet Oncology

Saatchi Bill: an interview with Dr. David Collingridge, Editor-in-Chief, The Lancet Oncology

The intention of the Medical Innovation Bill is to encourage and support doctors to explore new medicines for their patients when they believe existing options are no longer achieving good outcomes. [More]
Eating habits and brain chemistry: an interview with Dr Kevin Hall

Eating habits and brain chemistry: an interview with Dr Kevin Hall

Several times every day, we choose when, where, what, with whom, and how much to eat. Many of these eating decisions have become automatic and don’t require cognitive effort. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]
Cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence: an interview with Dr Sanna, TSRI

Cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence: an interview with Dr Sanna, TSRI

In the brain there are both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. These are molecules that are released from nerve endings in the brain and in the periphery and either excite or inhibit other nerve cells, also known as neurons. [More]
Phenotyping human diseases in mice: an interview with Professor Carola Vinuesa

Phenotyping human diseases in mice: an interview with Professor Carola Vinuesa

One of the main obstacles to finding effective therapies for human diseases has been our limited understanding of disease pathogenesis: we lack detailed knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of disease. [More]
ADHD information on social media: an interview with Gemma Ryan

ADHD information on social media: an interview with Gemma Ryan

It came about through the implementation of another ADHD project called One Stop Shop, which is a collaborative project with Leicestershire Partnership NHS trust (LPT) and ADHD Solutions, a charitable support organization. [More]
Curcumin and tackling mesothelioma: an interview with Dr. Afshin Dowlati

Curcumin and tackling mesothelioma: an interview with Dr. Afshin Dowlati

An important point about this work is that the research into curcumin was conducted following a discovery about mesothelioma, rather than being the primary endpoint of the study. [More]
Using cardiac biomarkers to identify NSTEMI and ACS patients: an interview with Peter Mason

Using cardiac biomarkers to identify NSTEMI and ACS patients: an interview with Peter Mason

ACS is currently identified through the use of ECGs pre-hospital and the confirmed via a Troponin biomarker test once in the acute setting. [More]
Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Synapses are the sites that connect neurons – sites where information is passed from one neuron to another. They are highly specialized structures and synaptic function is crucial for normal brain function. [More]
Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

We've known about chemicals that can be light-activated for about five to ten years now. They’ve mainly all been applied to neurons and, more specifically, the retina. Nobody has ever really looked at any tissues outside of the nervous system. [More]
3D brain-like tissue: an interview with Professor David Kaplan, Tufts University

3D brain-like tissue: an interview with Professor David Kaplan, Tufts University

In 2D, neurons tend to form limited connectivity reflective of the 3D complexity in the brain and have more limited cultivation time before reduction in functions. [More]
Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

The classic description of game theory was described by the prisoner's dilemma, which is a situation in which two players have two options where the outcome depends on the simultaneous choice made by the other. [More]
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