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Rixadone

contains the active ingredient risperidone
CONSUMER MEDICINE INFORMATION
 

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. This page contains answers to some common questions about Rixadone. It does not contain all the information that is known about Rixadone. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risk of you using this medicine against the benefits he/she expects it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Bookmark or print this page, you may need to read it again.

What RIXADONE is used for

RIXADONE belongs to a group of medicines called antipsychotic agents which improve the symptoms of certain types of mental illness.
It is used for:
treatment of sudden (acute) and long-term (chronic) schizophrenia and other types of related psychoses. These are disorders related to thought, feeling and/or action,
short term treatment of acute mania associated with bipolar 1 disorder. This condition is characterised by symptoms such as elevated, expansive or irritable mood, inflated self esteem, decreased need for sleep, pressured speech, racing thoughts, distractibility or poor judgement including disruptive or aggressive behaviours,
treatment of behavioural problems in patients with a decline in mental ability (dementia) caused by Alzheimer's disease. These problems include: aggression through words or action, morbid suspiciousness, agitation or wandering,
treatment of conduct and other disruptive behaviours such as aggression, impulsiveness and self-injury in children (over 5 years old), adolescents and adults who are intellectually disabled,
treatment of behavioural symptoms of autism in children and adolescent.
RIXADONE helps to correct a chemical imbalance in the brain associated with these conditions.
This medicine has been approved for the uses mentioned above. However, your doctor may prescribe it for another use. If you want more information, ask your doctor. It is only available with a doctor's prescription.
RIXADONE is not addictive.

Before you take RIXADONE

When you must not take it

Do not use RIXADONE:
if you know you are allergic to any of its ingredients (signs of allergy include skin rash, itching, shortness of breath, and/or swollen face - see the last section of this leaflet for a list of ingredients)
if the packaging is torn or shows signs of being tampered with
if the tablets or the oral solution do not look right
to treat any other complaints unless your doctor says it is safe to do so.

Before you start to take it

RIXADONE should be used with caution in some patients.
Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any medical conditions, especially the following:
heart or blood vessel problems, including high and low blood pressure.
Low blood pressure can result from using RIXADONE together with medications to treat high blood pressure. So, if you need to use both RIXADONE and medications to reduce blood pressure, consult your doctor.
RIXADONE should be used with caution, and only after consultation with your doctor, if you have heart problems, particularly irregular heart rhythm, abnormalities in electrical activity of the heart, or if using medications that can change the heart's electrical activity.
disease of the blood vessels of the brain including stroke
dehydration
kidney or liver problems
Parkinson's disease
dementia or Lewy body dementia
epilepsy, seizures
restlessness or difficulty sitting still
intraoperative iris syndrome (a complication that may occur during cataract extraction)
suicide
low blood potassium levels (hypokalaemia)
low blood sugar
breast cancer
disease of the pituitary gland
diabetes
Tardive dyskinesia (a reaction to some medicines with uncontrollable twitching or jerking movements of the arms and legs)
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (a serious reaction to some medicines with a sudden increase in body temperature, extremely high blood pressure and severe convulsions).
blood clots
Tell your doctor if you or someone else in your family has a history of blood clots. Blood clots in the lungs and legs have been seen in patients taking RIXADONE. Blood clots in the lungs can be fatal.
low white blood cell count
As dangerously low numbers of certain types of white blood cells needed to fight infection in your blood has been seen very rarely with patients taking RIXADONE, your doctor may check your white blood cell counts. Tell your doctor if you know that you have had low levels of white blood cells in the past (which may or may not have been caused by other medicines).
Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or intend to become pregnant. Your doctor will advise you whether or not you should take RIXADONE.
Shaking, muscle stiffness and difficulty in feeding, all of which are reversible, may occur in newborns, if a mother uses the medicine in the last trimester of her pregnancy
Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.
RIXADONE is excreted in breast milk. It is recommended that you do not breast-feed while taking the medicine.

Taking other medicines

RIXADONE can increase the effect of other medicines which slow your reactions.
Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines, including any that you buy without a prescription from your pharmacy, supermarket or health food shop.
Ask your doctor or pharmacist before taking any other medicines. RIXADONE can increase the effects of medicines which slow your reactions. These include herbal treatments and those bought in a pharmacy or supermarket.
Tell your doctor if you are taking:
diuretics like frusemide (trade names LASIX, UREMIDE, UREX, FRUSID, or FRUSEHEXAL),, a drug used to treat high blood pressure, or to treat swelling of parts of the body caused by the build-up of too much fluid, There is an increased risk of side effects or death in elderly people if frusemide is also taken with RIXADONE.
sleeping tablets, tranquillisers, pain-killers, antihistamines
antibiotics like rifampicin
carbamazepine, a drug mainly used for epilepsy or trigeminal neuralgia (severe pain attacks in the face) may decrease the level of RIXADONE in your blood.
Anti-fungals like itraconazole and ketoconazole
medicines to treat Parkinson's disease or a tremor
medicines to treat epilepsy
medicines to treat depression, panic disorder, anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder. For example fluoxetine and paroxetine may increase the level of RIXADONE in your blood. So tell your doctor if you start and/or stop taking fluoxetine or paroxetine
medicines for your heart or blood pressure
medicines to treat pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder
other medicines to treat mental illness or psychotic conditions
medicines to relieve severe nausea and vomiting.

How to take RIXADONE

How much to take

Your doctor will decide the dose suitable for you.
Follow your doctor's instructions carefully and do not change or stop the required dosage without consulting your doctor first.
Important note: never take more tablets or solution than your doctor tells you to take.
The maximum daily dose of RIXADONE is 5 milligrams taken twice a day. Check with your doctor if more than this has been prescribed. The effects of high doses are not yet known.
RIXADONE cannot be recommended for use in children with schizophrenia under 15 years at the present time as there is little experience with the product in this group.
For Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses
The usual starting dose of RIXADONE is 1 mg twice a day. This will be gradually increased by your doctor to suit your needs.
From then on, the dose can be taken once a day or twice a day according to your doctor's instructions. For long-term treatment, 4 to 6 milligrams per day is usually sufficient but your doctor will determine the dose most suitable for you.
For Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia or Related Psychoses
For older patients a starting dose of 0.5 mg (or 0.5 mL of solution) twice a day (in the morning and in the evening is usual). The dose may be increased by 0.5 mg twice daily to 1 to 2 mg twice a day (in the morning and in the evening).
Patients with impaired kidney and liver function.
If you have kidney or liver disease a starting dose of 0.5 mg (or 0.5 mL of solution) twice a day (in the morning and in the evening) is usual. The dose may be increased by 0.5 mg twice daily to 1 to 2 mg twice a day (in the morning and in the evening).
For acute mania
The recommended starting dose is 2mg once a day. This dose can be adjusted by dose increases of 1mg when needed every 24 hours. Most people feel better with doses between 2mg and 6mg a day. Your doctor may decide you should take another drug called a mood stabiliser as well as RIXADONE.
For Behavioural Problems in People with Dementia
The usual starting dose is 0.25 mg twice daily. This may be gradually increased by your doctor to suit your needs.
From then on the dose can be taken once a day or twice a day according to your doctor's instructions. For long-term treatment, 1 mg daily is the usual dose but your doctor will determine the dose most suitable for you.
For Disruptive Behaviour Disorders in Adults and Children
For people who weigh 50 kg or more, the usual starting dose is 0.5 mg (or 0.5 mL of solution) once a day. The dose may be increased by 0.5 mg once every two days, to the usual dose of 0.5 to 1.5 mg once a day.
For people who weigh less than 50 kg, the usual starting dose is 0.25 mg once a day. The dose may be increased by 0.25 mg once every two days, to the usual dose of 0.25 to 0.75 mg once a day.
Your doctor will advise you on how much RIXADONE you need.
RIXADONE cannot be recommended for use in children with disruptive behaviour disorders under 5 years at the present time as there is little experience with the product in this group.
For Behavioural Disorders Associated with Autism in Children and Adolescents
For people weighing less than 20kg the usual starting dose is 0.25mg. On day 4 this dose can be increased to 0.5mg.
For people weighing 20kg or more the usual starting dose is 0.5mg. On day 4 this dose can be increased to 1.0mg.
Response should be assessed at day 14; only in patients not achieving sufficient clinical response should additional dose increases be considered. Your doctor will advise you on how much RIXADONE you need. When trialled, the maximum dose in patients with autism did not exceed 1.5mg/day in patients less than 20kg, 2.5mg in patients 20kg or more, or 3.5mg in patients more than 45kg.

How to take it

Swallow RIXADONE tablets with water or other liquid.

When to take it

RIXADONE may be taken as a single dose, once a day or it may be taken in divided doses twice a day (in the morning and in the evening). You may take RIXADONE either with or between meals.

How long to take it for

Continue taking the tablets for as long as your doctor tells you.
RIXADONE helps control your condition, but does not cure it. Therefore you must take RIXADONE every day.
Do not stop taking it unless your doctor tells you to - even if you feel better.

If you forget to take it

If you forget to take RIXADONE, take the missed dose as soon as you remember instead of your next dose. Then go back to taking it as you would normally.
Do not take a double dose to make up for the one you missed.
If you forget to take RIXADONE for 5 days or more, tell your doctor before starting your medicine again.
If you have problems remembering when to take your medicine, ask your pharmacist for some hints.

If you take too much (overdose)

Immediately telephone your doctor or the Poisons Information Centre, or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital, if you think that you or anyone else may have taken too much RIXADONE. Do this even if there are no signs of discomfort or poisoning.
You can contact the Poisons Information Centre by dialling: Australia: 13 11 26
Signs of overdose may include drowsiness, sleepiness, excessive trembling, excessive muscle stiffness, increased heart rate, very low blood pressure causing fainting or unconsciousness.

While you are using RIXADONE

Things you must do

Always follow your doctor's instructions carefully, and seek your doctor's advice before changing or stopping treatment.
Your doctor will be happy to discuss any questions you may have with your treatment.
Try to eat a moderate diet.
RIXADONE can cause weight gain.
You should make sure you are not pregnant.
Pre-menopausal women should tell their doctor if they do not have a period for more than six months while taking RIXADONE.
Tell your doctor immediately if you notice any worm-like movements of the tongue, or other uncontrolled movements of the tongue, mouth, cheeks or jaw which may progress to the arms and legs.
These are symptoms of a condition called tardive dyskinesia, which may develop in people taking antipsychotic medicines, including RIXADONE. This condition is more likely to occur during long term treatment with RIXADONE, especially in elderly women. In very rare cases, this may be permanent. However, if detected early, these symptoms are usually reversible.
Tell any other doctors, dentists, and pharmacists who are treating you that you are taking RIXADONE.
Try to drink plenty of water, especially if you are elderly and taking frusemide (a diuretic). This will help decrease your risk of certain side effects.

Things you must not do

Do not drink alcohol.
RIXADONE can increase the effects of alcohol.

Things to be careful of

Be careful driving or operating machinery until you know how RIXADONE affects you.
RIXADONE may cause dizziness or light-headedness in some people, especially after the first dose. Make sure you know how you react to RIXADONE before you drive a car, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy.
Avoid excessive eating, as there is a possibility of weight gain when taking RIXADONE.

Side effects

All medicines can have some unwanted side effects. Sometimes they are serious, but most of the time they are not. Your doctor has weighed the risks of using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you.
All medicines can have side effects. You may need medical treatment if you get some of the side effects.
Ask your doctor or pharmacist to answer any questions you may have.
Tell your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if you do not feel well while you are taking RIXADONE
You may need medical treatment if you get some of the side effects.
Taking it for the first time.
At the start of treatment you may have a fall in blood pressure making you feel dizzy on standing up, or your heart may beat faster. These should go away after a few days. Tell your doctor if they continue or worry you.
Tell your doctor if you notice any of the following and they worry you:
difficulty thinking or working because of:
sleeplessness
headache
trembling
drowsiness, tiredness, difficulty in concentrating
behavioural changes such as:
agitation
anxiety
joint or movement changes such as:
muscle stiffness
restlessness in the legs
other changes such as:
weight gain
indigestion, nausea, abdominal pain, constipation
excessive thirst
frequent urination
blockage in the bowel
unusual secretion of breast milk
breast swelling
missed or irregular menstrual periods
involuntary movements of the tongue, face, mouth, jaws, arms, legs or trunk
These are mild side effects of RIXADONE but may require medical attention.
Tell your doctor immediately, or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital if you notice any of the following:
heart or blood pressure problems such as:
fall in blood pressure, particularly on standing. This will be apparent to you as light-headedness or dizziness that passes after a few seconds or after sitting down again
faster heart rate, slowed heart rate, heart beat irregularities
body temperature changes such as:
fever
abnormally high body temperature
These may be serious side effects of RIXADONE. You may need urgent medical attention.
Serious side effects are uncommon.
If any of the following happen, stop taking RIXADONE and tell your doctor immediately or go to Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital:
rash, itching or hives on the skin; shortness of breath, wheezing or difficulty breathing; swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body. If you have them, you may have had a serious allergic reaction to RIXADONE.
sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arms, or legs, especially on one side, or instances of slurred speech (these are called mini-strokes)
in elderly patients with dementia, occurrence of following even for a short period time: sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arms or legs, especially on one side, instances of slurred speech and stroke
These are very serious side effects. You may need urgent medical attention or hospitalisation.
Tell your doctor if you notice anything else that is making you feel unwell.
Other side effects not listed above may occur in some consumers.
Do not hesitate to report any other side effects to your doctor or pharmacist.
Do not be alarmed by this list of possible side effects.
You may not experience any of them.

After taking RIXADONE

Storage

Keep your tablets in the pack until it is time to take them.
If you take the tablets out of the pack they may not keep well.
Keep your tablets in a cool dry place where the temperature stays below 25°C.
Do not store RIXADONE or any other medicine in the bathroom or near a sink. Do not leave it on a window sill or in the car.
Heat and dampness can destroy some medicines.
Keep it where children cannot reach it.
A locked cupboard at least one-and-a-half metres above the ground is a good place to store medicines.

Disposal

If your doctor tells you to stop taking this medicine or the expiry date has passed, ask your pharmacist what to do with any medicine that is left over.

Product description

What it looks like

RIXADONE 0.5 mg: Red-brown, round, biconvex, film coated tablet with break line on one side and debossed "0.5" on the other side.
RIXADONE 1 mg: White, round, biconvex, film coated tablet with break line on one side and debossed "1" on the other side.
RIXADONE 2 mg: Orange, round, biconvex, film coated tablet with break line on one side and debossed "2" on the other side.
RIXADONE 3 mg: Yellow, round, biconvex, film coated tablet with break line on one side and debossed "3" on the other side.
RIXADONE 4 mg: Green, round, biconvex, film coated tablet with break line on one side and debossed "4" on the other side.
RIXADONE 0.5 mg tablets are available in blister packs of 20 and 60 tablets.
RIXADONE 1 mg, 2 mg, 3 mg and 4 mg tablets are available in blister packs of 60 tablets.

Ingredients

RIXADONE contains 0.5 mg, 1 mg, 2 mg, 3 mg or 4 mg of risperidone as the active ingredient.
It also contains the following inactive ingredients:
lactose
microcrystalline cellulose
pregelatinised maize starch
sodium lauryl sulphate
colloidal anhydrous silica
magnesium stearate
purified talc
hypromellose
propylene glycol
titanium dioxide (CI 77891)
Additionally, the following tablet strengths also contain the following colouring agents:
RIXADONE 0.5 mg
iron oxide black (CI 77499)
iron oxide red (CI 77491)
RIXADONE 2 mg
sunset yellow FCF (CI 15985)
RIXADONE 3 mg
quinoline yellow (CI 47005)
RIXADONE 4 mg
quinoline yellow (CI 47005)
indigo carmine (CI 73015)
This medicine does not contain sucrose or gluten.

Supplier

RIXADONE is supplied in Australia by:
Alphapharm Pty Limited
(ABN 93 002 359 739)
Level 1, 30 The Bond
30 - 34 Hickson Road
Millers Point NSW 2000
Phone: (02) 9298 3999
www.alphapharm.com.au
Australian registration numbers:
RIXADONE 0.5 mg: AUST R 199179
RIXADONE 1 mg: AUST R 199178
RIXADONE 2 mg: AUST R 199180
RIXADONE 3 mg: AUST R 199182
RIXADONE 4 mg: AUST R 199181
This leaflet was prepared on
22 July 2015.
Rixadone_cmi\Jul15/00