Abstinence News and Research RSS Feed - Abstinence News and Research

Abstinence is a voluntary restraint from indulging a desire or appetite for certain bodily activities that are widely experienced as giving pleasure. Most frequently, the term refers to abstention from sexual intercourse, alcohol or food. The practice can arise from religious prohibitions or practical considerations.
Drinking alcohol before pregnancy linked to intestinal birth defect

Drinking alcohol before pregnancy linked to intestinal birth defect

Women should refrain from drinking alcohol before they try to become pregnant, according to maternal-fetal medicine specialists at Loyola University Health System. [More]
UTMB awarded $6.6 million grant to establish Translational Addiction Sciences Center

UTMB awarded $6.6 million grant to establish Translational Addiction Sciences Center

The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded a five-year, $6.6 million grant to the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston to establish the Translational Addiction Sciences Center. The center will investigate the mechanisms underlying addiction with the goal of discovering and validating novel treatment options. [More]
Researchers develop effective behavioral economic approach that offers women financial incentives to quit smoking

Researchers develop effective behavioral economic approach that offers women financial incentives to quit smoking

Smoking during pregnancy - particularly among economically-disadvantaged women - leads to a host of poor pregnancy outcomes, including miscarriage, preterm birth, SIDS, and additional adverse effects later in life. Without a formal treatment intervention, women in this population continue to smoke, and their babies suffer. [More]
Researchers receive $3.7M NIH grant to develop anti-smoking program for HIV-infected smoker

Researchers receive $3.7M NIH grant to develop anti-smoking program for HIV-infected smoker

Montefiore Medical Center researchers have received a $3.7 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop an anti-smoking program for HIV-infected smokers. [More]
Research findings have important implications for personalized treatment of alcohol abuse

Research findings have important implications for personalized treatment of alcohol abuse

Heavy drinking is common in the United States and takes a personal and societal toll, with an annual estimated cost of $223.5 billion due to losses in workplace productivity, health care and criminal justice expenses. [More]
Topiramate reduces drinking in patients committed to abstinence from alcohol

Topiramate reduces drinking in patients committed to abstinence from alcohol

Heavy drinking alcohol consumption is common in the United States and takes a personal and societal toll, with an annual estimated cost of $223.5 billion due to losses in workplace productivity, and health care and criminal justice expenses. [More]
Outcome good for patients with dual alcohol use and affective disorders

Outcome good for patients with dual alcohol use and affective disorders

Alcohol use disorders in patients with depression or bipolar disorder can be successfully treated with intervention and follow-up, say researchers. [More]
Aetna is helping to reverse abuse of prescription painkillers

Aetna is helping to reverse abuse of prescription painkillers

Abuse of prescription painkillers, known as opioids, is a widespread and growing problem in the United States. The epidemic adds billions of dollars to health care, work place and criminal justice costs each year. [More]
Study: Combined medications may improve smoking cessation than single drug therapy

Study: Combined medications may improve smoking cessation than single drug therapy

Among cigarette smokers, combining the smoking cessation medications varenicline and bupropion, compared with varenicline alone, resulted in higher smoking abstinence rates for one outcome but not the other at three and six months; rates were similar at one year, according to a Mayo Clinic study published this month in JAMA. [More]
Cognitive rest can benefit patients diagnosed with concussion

Cognitive rest can benefit patients diagnosed with concussion

A study of 335 teen athletes diagnosed with concussion suggests that patients who comply with cognitive rest limits may recover faster than those who engage in increased cognitive activity, such as texting, reading and playing video games. [More]
HAMS offers evidence-based strategies to help change drinking habits for the better

HAMS offers evidence-based strategies to help change drinking habits for the better

Every year at New Year's millions of people make resolutions to change habits such as drinking alcohol, smoking, overeating, exercise, etc. However, research by Richard Wiseman from the University of Bristol shows that only 12% of New Year's resolutions succeed; the other 88% fail. What is the difference between those who succeed and those who fail? Do some of us have wills of iron whereas others have wills of Silly Putty? Not at all. [More]
Coupling meditation-like practices with drug and behavior therapies more helpful in tackling addiction

Coupling meditation-like practices with drug and behavior therapies more helpful in tackling addiction

Using a computational model of addiction, a literature review and an in silico experiment, theoretical computer scientist Yariv Levy and colleagues suggest in a new paper this week that rehabilitation strategies coupling meditation-like practices with drug and behavior therapies are more helpful than drug-plus-talk therapy alone when helping people overcome addiction. [More]
Alpha Biolaboratories launches first accredited next day DNA paternity testing service in UK

Alpha Biolaboratories launches first accredited next day DNA paternity testing service in UK

A Warrington-based DNA testing laboratory is offering the UK's first standard next day paternity results service and is on a recruitment drive to cope with the anticipated increase in demand. [More]
Smokers who quit faster may be able to lower risk of cardiovascular disease-related deaths

Smokers who quit faster may be able to lower risk of cardiovascular disease-related deaths

Cigarette smokers who are over 65 years of age may be able to lower their risk of cardiovascular disease-related deaths to the level of never-smokers when they quit faster than previously reported, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013. [More]
Spirituality in teens linked with increased positive social behaviors, reduced narcissism

Spirituality in teens linked with increased positive social behaviors, reduced narcissism

If the spirit is truly willing, perhaps the flesh is not so weak, after all. Increased spirituality in teens undergoing substance abuse treatment is associated with greater likelihood of abstinence (as measured by toxicology screens), increased positive social behaviors, and reduced narcissism, according to a study by researchers from The University of Akron, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and Baylor University. [More]
Lifestyle of veterans influences their post-deployment wellness

Lifestyle of veterans influences their post-deployment wellness

A new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion finds that the lifestyle of veterans both pre- and post-deployment influences their post-deployment wellness. [More]
Binge drinking increases atherosclerotic progression, stroke mortality risk in men

Binge drinking increases atherosclerotic progression, stroke mortality risk in men

A Finnish population-based study showed that binge drinking was associated with increased atherosclerotic progression in an 11-year follow-up of middle-aged men. The progression of atherosclerosis was increased among men who consumed 6 drinks or more on one occasion. [More]
Use of cocaine may increase one's vulnerability to HIV infection

Use of cocaine may increase one's vulnerability to HIV infection

Cocaine use may increase one's vulnerability to HIV infection, according to a new research report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. In the report, scientists show that cocaine alters immune cells, called "quiescent CD4 T cells," to render them more susceptible to the virus, and at the same time, to allow for increased proliferation of the virus. [More]

People on health related social networking sites more likely to abstain from smoking

Smoking is a major public health problem, killing approximately 443,000 people every year in the United States. Quitting smoking can have a profound effect on a person's health, but it is also one of the hardest addictions to kick. A recent paper published in the Journal of Communication found that people who engage in health specific social networking sites found it easier to quit smoking. [More]
Long-term abstinence from cocaine does not result in complete normalization of brain circuitry

Long-term abstinence from cocaine does not result in complete normalization of brain circuitry

​It is often said that once people develop an addiction, they can never completely eliminate their attraction to the abused substance. New findings provide further support for this notion by suggesting that even long-term abstinence from cocaine does not result in a complete normalization of brain circuitry. [More]