Addiction News and Research RSS Feed - Addiction News and Research

HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

Epigenetics is the study of changes in organisms caused by modifying gene expression - by alcohol, for example - rather than alteration of the genetic code itself. Recent evidence suggests that alcohol can inhibit activity of an enzyme called histone deacetylase (HDAC) in the amygdala, a brain region that is crucial for storing memories and regulating fear, anxiety, and other emotions. [More]

Mobile breathalyzers could help improve outcomes in intensive outpatient treatment for AUDs

Alcohol treatment has come a long way from enforced isolation in asylums, and technological advancements are particularly promising in terms of their capacity to improve treatment effectiveness. [More]
Federal government continues to ban valid scientific research on medicinal use of Cannabis sativa

Federal government continues to ban valid scientific research on medicinal use of Cannabis sativa

The use of medical marijuana for millions of patients suffering from a wide range of health conditions and the subsequent therapeutic benefits has long been documented. [More]
Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

There is merit in looking at the use of wearable biosensors to detect whether opioid users stay focused on their rehabilitation programs. [More]
Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

A molecule that enables strong communication between our brain and muscles appears to also aid essential communication between our neurons, scientists report. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
JAMA edition provides summary of FSMB policy recommendations about marijuana in patient care

JAMA edition provides summary of FSMB policy recommendations about marijuana in patient care

The Journal of the American Medical Association has published in its online edition a summary of new policy adopted by the Federation of State Medical Boards that provides recommendations about marijuana in patient care and a cautionary note advising actively licensed physicians to abstain from using marijuana while practicing medicine. [More]
New survey reveals more than half of patients prescribed opioids have leftover pills

New survey reveals more than half of patients prescribed opioids have leftover pills

In the midst of an epidemic of prescription painkiller addiction and overdose deaths, a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health survey suggests that more than half of patients prescribed opioids have leftover pills -- and many save them to use later. [More]
Marijuana and alcohol use during adolescence linked to poor academic performance, mental health

Marijuana and alcohol use during adolescence linked to poor academic performance, mental health

Adolescents who use both marijuana and alcohol during middle school and high school are more likely to have poor academic performance and mental health during high school, according to a new study by the nonprofit RAND Corporation that followed a group of students over a seven-year period. [More]
Databases of proteins' 3-D shapes help identify more than 850 DNA mutations linked to cancer

Databases of proteins' 3-D shapes help identify more than 850 DNA mutations linked to cancer

Examining databases of proteins' 3-D shapes, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified more than 850 DNA mutations that appear to be linked to cancer. [More]
PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

Alcoholism is a devastating disorder that too often leads to a perpetual cycle of abuse. An emerging molecular imaging technique may provide a way to break that cycle. [More]
Study sheds new light on the brain’s decision-making processes

Study sheds new light on the brain’s decision-making processes

Netflix binge-watching versus a hike in the woods. A cheeseburger versus kale salad. Fentanyl versus Tylenol. New UC research from the University California, Berkeley, suggests our brain activity could be influenced to make the healthier choice. [More]
Glial cells may play crucial role in addiction-related behaviors

Glial cells may play crucial role in addiction-related behaviors

Addiction may be viewed as a disorder of reward learning. To date, addiction research has focused on the molecular adaptations through which memories of exposure to abused substances are encoded and maintained by nerve cells. [More]
Genetic variation may predispose certain Asian-Americans to food addiction

Genetic variation may predispose certain Asian-Americans to food addiction

Rice anyone? How about a bowl of ramen noodles? Researchers have found that some Asian-Americans are more likely to hunger for carbohydrates and unhealthy foods than other Asian-Americans -- and the reason appears to be genetic. [More]
GFE3 protein may help researchers modify brain activity, memory in targeted ways

GFE3 protein may help researchers modify brain activity, memory in targeted ways

Scientists at USC have developed a new tool to modify brain activity and memory in targeted ways, without the help of any drugs or chemicals. [More]
Misuse of anabolic steroids may increase heart problems in ARVC patients

Misuse of anabolic steroids may increase heart problems in ARVC patients

Research has already shown that taking anabolic steroids is associated with high blood pressure and an increased risk of developing heart conditions such as left ventricular hypertrophy. [More]
Scientists use optogenetics technique to increase memory in mice brain

Scientists use optogenetics technique to increase memory in mice brain

Raül Andero Galí, one of the heads of the "Neurobiology of Stress and Addiction" research group at the Institut de Neurociències of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and researcher at Harvard University, published an article in which, for the first time in Spain, optogenetics was used to increase memory. [More]
Suppression of ventral pallidum neurons could be key to control binge behavior

Suppression of ventral pallidum neurons could be key to control binge behavior

Rats that responded to cues for sugar with the speed and excitement of binge-eaters were less motivated for the treat when certain neurons were suppressed, researchers discovered. [More]
Understanding how opiates affect brain pathways to drive addiction cycle

Understanding how opiates affect brain pathways to drive addiction cycle

New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle. [More]
Luteal phase of menstrual cycle may help thwart smoking behavior in women

Luteal phase of menstrual cycle may help thwart smoking behavior in women

Women who want to quit smoking may have better success by carefully timing their quit date with optimal days within their menstrual cycle, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement