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Eating high levels of flavonoids found in berries, tea, and chocolate offer protection from type 2 diabetes

Eating high levels of flavonoids found in berries, tea, and chocolate offer protection from type 2 diabetes

Eating high levels of flavonoids including anthocyanins and other compounds (found in berries, tea, and chocolate) could offer protection from type 2 diabetes - according to research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and King's College London. [More]
Tomato-rich diet may help lower breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women

Tomato-rich diet may help lower breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women

A tomato-rich diet may help protect postmenopausal women from breast cancer, according to new research published this week in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Philipp E. Scherer honored with 15th Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes

Philipp E. Scherer honored with 15th Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes

Columbia University Medical Center has honored Philipp E. Scherer, PhD, with the 15th Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes, for his work that helped usher in a new understanding of fat and its role in diabetes and other metabolic diseases. His discovery of adiponectin, a hormone produced by fat, helped transform the scientific concept of fat as an inert storage depot to one of it as an endocrine "organ" that exerts control over the brain, muscles, and other organs. The award, given annually by CUMC's Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, is Columbia's top honor for excellence in diabetes research. [More]
Study finds low adiponectin levels prior to pregnancy linked to high risk of gestational diabetes

Study finds low adiponectin levels prior to pregnancy linked to high risk of gestational diabetes

Overweight women with low levels of the hormone adiponectin prior to pregnancy are nearly seven times more likely to develop gestational diabetes, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Diabetes Care. Adiponectin protects against insulin resistance, inflammation and heart disease. [More]
Inflammatory status upregulated in first-episode schizophrenia

Inflammatory status upregulated in first-episode schizophrenia

Patients with first-episode schizophrenia exhibit upregulation of key proinflammatory molecules, study findings show. [More]
Salsalate lowers blood glucose and improves glycemic control in T2D, say scientists

Salsalate lowers blood glucose and improves glycemic control in T2D, say scientists

Joslin scientists report that salsalate, a drug used to treat arthritis, lowers blood glucose and improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. These findings, which were published today by the Annals of Internal Medicine, provide additional evidence that salsalate may be an effective drug to treat type 2 diabetes. [More]

Gene switch off may increase risk of heart and blood vessel disease: Research

Risk of heart and blood vessel disease may increase when a particular gene is switched off, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Emerging Science Series Webinar. [More]

Research: Fetal exposure to BPA causes inflammation in fat tissues after birth

New research suggests that fetal exposure to the common environmental chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, causes increased inflammation in fat tissues after birth, which can lead to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Results of the animal study were presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco. [More]
Obesity in adolescents is associated with sensorineural hearing loss

Obesity in adolescents is associated with sensorineural hearing loss

Obese adolescents are more likely than their normal-weight counterparts to have hearing loss, according to results of a new study. Findings showed that obese adolescents had increased hearing loss across all frequencies and were almost twice as likely to have unilateral (one-sided) low-frequency hearing loss. [More]

Vitamin D deficiency can increase asthma and allergy risk in obese children and teenagers

One reason why obese children and teenagers are more likely to have hard-to-control asthma and allergies may be vitamin D deficiency, a new study finds. Results of the study will be presented Tuesday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco. [More]
Intermittent fasting: A path to weight loss and improved cardiovascular risk

Intermittent fasting: A path to weight loss and improved cardiovascular risk

Intermittent fasting is all the rage, but scientific evidence showing how such regimes affect human health is not always clear cut. Now a scientific review in the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease published by SAGE, suggests that fasting diets may help those with diabetes and cardiovascular disease, alongside established weight loss claims. [More]
Migraine severity and adiponectin: an interview with Dr. B. Lee Peterlin, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Migraine severity and adiponectin: an interview with Dr. B. Lee Peterlin, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Migraine affects an estimated 30 million people in the U.S, with the one year prevalence of migraine estimated at 12% of the general population, including 18% of all women and 6% of all men. [More]

Imbalance between neutrophil elastase and α1-antitrypsin leads to obesity, inflammation

Many recent studies have suggested that obesity is associated with chronic inflammation in fat tissues. Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have discovered that an imbalance between an enzyme called neutrophil elastase and its inhibitor causes inflammation, obesity, insulin resistance, and fatty liver disease. [More]

Severity of Migraines can be identified by blood levels of fat cell hormone

In a small, preliminary study of regular migraine sufferers, scientists have found that measuring a fat-derived protein called adiponectin (ADP) before and after migraine treatment can accurately reveal which headache victims felt pain relief. [More]

Migraine severity may be predicted by blood levels of fat cell hormone

In a small, preliminary study of regular migraine sufferers, scientists have found that measuring a fat-derived protein called adiponectin (ADP) before and after migraine treatment can accurately reveal which headache victims felt pain relief. [More]
Anti-metabolic syndrome efforts needed for young ALL survivors

Anti-metabolic syndrome efforts needed for young ALL survivors

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at risk for developing the metabolic syndrome during maintenance therapy, suggest study findings. [More]
Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 involved in renal decline in diabetes

Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 involved in renal decline in diabetes

Researchers have found that circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 are independently associated with the development of chronic kidney disease in nonobese Japanese patients with Type 2 diabetes. [More]

Tall, thin women face increased risk of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria

Tall, thin women face a greater risk of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), cousins of the organism that causes tuberculosis, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. Women with NTM infections also showed a weakened immune response associated with their fat cells, in a paper published in the Jan. 15, 2013, issue of The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care. [More]
Adiponectin flags up pancreatic cancer risk

Adiponectin flags up pancreatic cancer risk

Circulating levels of adiponectin may provide a novel marker for identifying individuals who are at an increased risk for pancreatic cancer, report researchers. [More]
Adiponectin level may underpin atherogenic haptoglobin phenotype

Adiponectin level may underpin atherogenic haptoglobin phenotype

Researchers have suggested an active role for adiponectin in the pathophysiology of vascular disease in patients with diabetes, which depends on their haptoglobin phenotype. [More]