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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

Parents may be confused with how and when to introduce peanut-containing foods to their infants. [More]
New research shows how synthetic DNA vaccine approach protects against Zika virus infection

New research shows how synthetic DNA vaccine approach protects against Zika virus infection

As the global spread of the Zika virus continues, efforts are underway to halt the disease's transmission. [More]
Research offers new insights into how immunotherapy could help treat or functionally cure HIV

Research offers new insights into how immunotherapy could help treat or functionally cure HIV

Immunotherapy has revolutionized treatment options in oncology, neurology, and many infectious diseases and now there is fresh hope that the same method could be used to treat or functionally cure HIV, according to two related studies from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Investigational treatment combination improves virologic control in SIV-infected monkeys

Investigational treatment combination improves virologic control in SIV-infected monkeys

Researchers have found that an investigational treatment combination of a therapeutic vaccine and an immune-stimulator improves virologic control and delays viral rebound following the discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in non-human primates infected with SIV, the simian form of HIV. [More]
Mosquito-borne diseases appear to be driven by infections in and around homes, research suggests

Mosquito-borne diseases appear to be driven by infections in and around homes, research suggests

Outbreaks of the mosquito-borne disease chikungunya appear to be driven by infections centered in and around the home, with women significantly more likely to become ill, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. [More]
Clinical study to test safety and ability of investigational Zika vaccine candidate begins

Clinical study to test safety and ability of investigational Zika vaccine candidate begins

The first of five early stage clinical trials to test the safety and ability of an investigational Zika vaccine candidate called the Zika Purified Inactivated Virus (ZPIV) vaccine to generate an immune system response has begun at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Clinical Trial Center in Silver Spring, Maryland. [More]
Researchers discover set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria

Researchers discover set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria

Houston Methodist researchers have discovered a set of immune proteins that facilitate long-lasting immunity against malaria. [More]
Vaccine-related rubella virus causes harm in some patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Vaccine-related rubella virus causes harm in some patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Some patients with rare primary immunodeficiency disorders may be at risk for infection by rubella virus, and possibly serious skin inflammation, after receiving the rubella vaccine, usually administered as part of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. [More]
FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application for the expanded use of ENBREL (etanercept), making it the first and only systemic therapy to treat pediatric patients (ages 4-17) with chronic moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
WSU researcher finds a way to reduce development of cancer cells

WSU researcher finds a way to reduce development of cancer cells

A Washington State University researcher has developed a way to reduce the development of cancer cells that are an infrequent but dangerous byproduct of gene therapy. [More]
Smoking may shorten HIV patients' lifespan more than HIV itself

Smoking may shorten HIV patients' lifespan more than HIV itself

Among people living with HIV who smoke cigarettes, smoking may now shorten their lifespan more than HIV itself, according to a new modeling study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
Research shows way to directly target genes within specific cell type

Research shows way to directly target genes within specific cell type

The cornerstone of genetics is the loss-of-function experiment. In short, this means that to figure out what exactly gene X is doing in a tissue of interest—be it developing brain cells or a pancreatic tumor—you somehow cut out, switch off or otherwise destroy gene X in that tissue and then watch what happens. [More]
Zika virus infection can break down and damage testes of male mice, new research shows

Zika virus infection can break down and damage testes of male mice, new research shows

New research in male mice has revealed that Zika virus infection can break down and severely damage the animals' testes. [More]
Study underscores challenges faced by people with food allergy in making safe food choices

Study underscores challenges faced by people with food allergy in making safe food choices

A study found that consumers with food allergy concerns often misunderstand food labels about allergens that say "may contain" or "manufactured on shared equipment." While they should avoid such products to prevent what could be a serious allergic reaction, up to 40 percent bought food items with precautionary allergen labels. [More]
Breakthrough research paves way for developing new asthma treatments

Breakthrough research paves way for developing new asthma treatments

'The study demonstrated for the first time that a protein called PP5 was significantly upregulated in the lungs of severe asthmatic patients compared to healthy controls. We are extremely excited by this paradigm shift observation.' - Dr Yassine Amrani, University of Leicester. [More]
Researchers develop new way to test strength of immune response

Researchers develop new way to test strength of immune response

The immune system orchestrates large and small scale attacks on innumerous targets: viruses, bacteria, cancer, but it also misfires causing allergy or autoimmune reactions. [More]
Neonatal vaccination of mice with bacteria prevents cockroach-induced asthma as adults

Neonatal vaccination of mice with bacteria prevents cockroach-induced asthma as adults

The hygiene hypothesis proposes that a 20th century surge in allergies and asthma is because people are living in increasingly hygienic environments. [More]
New technique shows promise for therapeutic reversal of food allergies

New technique shows promise for therapeutic reversal of food allergies

"This discovery reverses food allergies in mice, and we have many people with allergies volunteering their own cells for us to use in lab testing to move this research forward," said professor John Gordon, lead scientist behind the discovery just published in the current issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Scientists uncover new class of small molecules for fighting urinary tract infection

Scientists uncover new class of small molecules for fighting urinary tract infection

This spring, a Pennsylvania woman who developed a urinary tract infection (UTI) became the first patient in the U.S. reported to have a bacterial infection resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of last resort. [More]
Wearable patch shows promise for treating children with peanut allergy

Wearable patch shows promise for treating children with peanut allergy

A wearable patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein through the skin shows promise for treating children and young adults with peanut allergy, with greater benefits for younger children, according to one-year results from an ongoing clinical trial. [More]
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