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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Single VRC01 antibody infusion could suppress HIV level in people not taking ART

Single VRC01 antibody infusion could suppress HIV level in people not taking ART

A single infusion of a powerful antibody called VRC01 can suppress the level of HIV in the blood of infected people who are not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), scientists at the National Institutes of Health report in a paper published today. [More]
Immunogeneticist helps monitor immune responses in VRC01 phase 1 trial in HIV-infected individuals

Immunogeneticist helps monitor immune responses in VRC01 phase 1 trial in HIV-infected individuals

Janardan Pandey, Ph.D., an immunogeneticist specializing in immunoglobulin GM genes at the Medical University of South Carolina, helped monitor for immune responses that could limit the effectiveness of the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 in a phase 1 trial of that antibody in HIV-infected individuals led by a team at the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Zurampic (lesinurad) approved to treat high levels of hyperuricemia associated with gout

Zurampic (lesinurad) approved to treat high levels of hyperuricemia associated with gout

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zurampic (lesinurad) to treat high levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia) associated with gout, when used in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI), a type of drug approved to reduce the production of uric acid in the body. [More]
Large doses of vitamin A reduce severity of gastrointestinal disease in mice

Large doses of vitamin A reduce severity of gastrointestinal disease in mice

After observing that some gastrointestinal disease in premature human and mouse infants progresses only when certain immune system white blood cells go into inflammatory overdrive, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that giving large doses of vitamin A to mice converts those blood cells into inflammation suppressors and reduces the severity of the disease, compared to untreated mice. [More]
Nuvo Research announces topline results from WF10 Phase 2 trial for treatment of allergic rhinitis

Nuvo Research announces topline results from WF10 Phase 2 trial for treatment of allergic rhinitis

Nuvo Research Inc., a life sciences company with growing revenues and a diverse portfolio of topical products, today announced the results of its investigational Phase 2 clinical trial of WF10 (Trial) for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. [More]
Flu vaccine: the facts. An interview with Dr Lisa Maragakis

Flu vaccine: the facts. An interview with Dr Lisa Maragakis

There are different formulations of the flu vaccine but in general they all do the same thing, which is to stimulate our body's immune system to recognize and fight against the influenza virus. [More]
New funding supports research on new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria

New funding supports research on new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria

University of Toronto and McGill University scientists are leading an international partnership to discover new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases -- thanks to a contribution from Merck Canada Inc., as well as an additional $5 million supplement to a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing products to treat rare diseases where there is an unmet medical need, announced today positive results in its Phase 2 clinical trial, in which SGX942, a first-in-class Innate Defense Regulator (IDR), at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg, successfully reduced the median duration of severe oral mucositis by 50% in all patients and by 67% in patients receiving the most aggressive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for treatment of their head and neck cancer. [More]
BUSM researchers explore how do not resuscitate orders affect hospital rankings for pneumonia

BUSM researchers explore how do not resuscitate orders affect hospital rankings for pneumonia

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine examined how hospital differences in patient preferences for life-sustaining treatments (do not resuscitate, or DNR, orders) affected hospital rankings for pneumonia. [More]
Molecular signatures can predict flu vaccine responses in young and old

Molecular signatures can predict flu vaccine responses in young and old

What factors inhibit strong responses to seasonal flu vaccines in the elderly? Why do anti-flu antibodies last longer after vaccination in some people? Answers are emerging from an Emory University-based systems biology analysis of blood samples from more than 400 volunteers who received seasonal flu vaccines. Bali Pulendran, PhD, led a team of researchers who tracked patterns of gene expression, known as molecular signatures, of strong immune responses in volunteers' blood across five consecutive seasons from 2007 to 2011. [More]
Exposure to farm animals, pets in early childhood modifies allergy-related immunological mechanisms

Exposure to farm animals, pets in early childhood modifies allergy-related immunological mechanisms

Exposure to farm animals in early childhood modifies the key allergy-related immunological mechanisms, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study provides new insight into the role of dendritic cells and cytokine production in particular. [More]
Unhealthy microbiome shifts can lead to weight gain, obesity

Unhealthy microbiome shifts can lead to weight gain, obesity

The link between the gut microbiome and obesity seems clear, but just how changes to gut bacteria can cause weight gain is not. [More]
NIAID scientists successfully test prime-boost H7N9 influenza vaccine concept in clinical trial

NIAID scientists successfully test prime-boost H7N9 influenza vaccine concept in clinical trial

In clinical trials, several candidate H7N9 pandemic influenza vaccines made from inactivated viruses have been shown to be safe and to generate an immune response. However, scientists believe for practical use, these potential vaccines would require multiple doses or the addition of adjuvants, which enhance the immune response. [More]
TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

Members of the TET (short for ten-eleven translocation) family have been known to function as tumor suppressors for many years, but how they keep a lid on the uncontrolled cell proliferation of cancer cells had remained uncertain. Now, researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology demonstrate that TET proteins collectively constitute a major class of tumor suppressors and are required to maintain genome instability. [More]
Guidelines for finding the right summer camp for children with allergies or asthma

Guidelines for finding the right summer camp for children with allergies or asthma

The biggest worry for some kids as they head off to summer camp is whether their IPad will get a connection in the North Woods. Others have far graver concerns, including nasal allergies, asthma and food allergies. Parents of kids with these conditions have to do homework to determine the best camp fit for their child. The goal is to keep kids safe while allowing them to have fun and create memories. [More]
Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease, particularly asthma and hay fever, have about twice the rate of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, setting them on a course for heart disease at a surprisingly early age, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Gene therapy can restore immune systems of children and young adults with SCID-X1

Gene therapy can restore immune systems of children and young adults with SCID-X1

Gene therapy can safely rebuild the immune systems of older children and young adults with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a rare inherited disorder that primarily affects males, scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, have found. [More]
Experimental gene therapy may improve health outcomes for patients with some forms of blood disorders

Experimental gene therapy may improve health outcomes for patients with some forms of blood disorders

New research adds to a growing body of evidence that gene therapy, an experimental technique that involves correcting or replacing a person's mutated or malfunctioning genes, may improve health outcomes for patients with inherited bleeding and immune disorders as well as some forms of blood cancer. [More]
Researchers discover drug target and genetic pathway for graft-versus-host disease

Researchers discover drug target and genetic pathway for graft-versus-host disease

A Seattle Children's Research Institute lab has discovered a genetic pathway that can be targeted with existing drugs to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a common and deadly complication of bone marrow transplants. [More]
Specific environmental influences can neutralize effect of genetic variant that increases childhood asthma risk

Specific environmental influences can neutralize effect of genetic variant that increases childhood asthma risk

The effect of a widespread genetic variant that increases the risk for childhood asthma can be neutralized. A new study shows that young infants are particularly responsive to the positive influence of exposure to farm dust. [More]
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