Allergy News and Research RSS Feed - Allergy News and Research

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV

Women who took part in ASPIRE, a trial that found a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine was safe and helped protect against HIV, will soon be offered the opportunity to use the ring as part of a new study called HOPE. [More]
Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

Soligenix announces encouraging preliminary results of heat stable Ebola vaccine

A biopharmaceutical company collaborating with Hawai'i scientists on an Ebola vaccine announced encouraging news about its vaccine today. [More]
SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

SLU researchers study investigational vaccine for yellow fever

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development is studying an investigational vaccine for yellow fever, a potentially deadly disease that is spread by the same mosquito that transmits Zika virus. [More]
Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

The recent emergence of bacterial infections that are resistant to many existing antibiotics is driving an urgent need for tools to quickly identify the small number of therapies that are still effective for individual patients. [More]
Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure. [More]
Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Increasing the number of men who undergo circumcision and increasing the rates at which women with HIV are given antiretroviral therapy (ART) were associated with significant declines in the number of new male HIV infections in rural Ugandan communities, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health research suggests. [More]
Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists are using machine learning to identify important sequences of DNA within the mosquito genome that regulate how the insect's cells develop and behave. [More]
Study shows siblings of food allergic children do not experience food allergy symptoms

Study shows siblings of food allergic children do not experience food allergy symptoms

Families with a child who has food allergy often wonder if a younger sibling should be screened before introducing potentially allergenic foods. [More]
Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

In September 2014, President Obama issued an executive order for "Combating Antibiotic- Resistant Bacteria." Why the urgency? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the order noted, "estimates that annually at least 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths are caused by antibiotic- resistant bacteria in the United States alone." [More]
Childhood exposure to microbes through thumb-sucking, nail-biting may lower risk of allergies

Childhood exposure to microbes through thumb-sucking, nail-biting may lower risk of allergies

Children who suck their thumbs or bite their nails may be less likely to develop allergies, according to a new study from New Zealand's University of Otago. [More]
Scientists identify epigenetic alterations involved in autoinflammatory diseases

Scientists identify epigenetic alterations involved in autoinflammatory diseases

Researchers from the Chromatin and Disease group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by Dr. Esteban Ballestar, have identified for the first time epigenetic alterations in autoinflammatory diseases, particularly in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). [More]
Study results pave way to development of effective human vaccine against HIV

Study results pave way to development of effective human vaccine against HIV

A new scientific study conducted by a team of leading AIDS scientists reveal results that lead the way to the development of an effective human vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
WRAIR collaborates with Sanofi Pasteur to develop ZPIV vaccine candidate

WRAIR collaborates with Sanofi Pasteur to develop ZPIV vaccine candidate

The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research announces a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement for the development of a Zika vaccine candidate with Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi. [More]
Zinc acetate lozenges may be effective in treating common cold

Zinc acetate lozenges may be effective in treating common cold

Zinc acetate lozenges may reduce the duration of the common cold by nearly 3 days, according to a recent analysis. [More]
PREVAIL IV trial opens in Liberia for EVD survivors with persistent traces of Ebola virus RNA

PREVAIL IV trial opens in Liberia for EVD survivors with persistent traces of Ebola virus RNA

The Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, a U.S.-Liberia joint Clinical Research Partnership, today announced the opening of PREVAIL IV, a treatment trial for men who have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) but continue to have evidence of Ebola virus genetic material, RNA, in their semen. [More]
New lung-targeted gene therapy shows promise in improving treatment for emphysema

New lung-targeted gene therapy shows promise in improving treatment for emphysema

Researchers have developed a new strategy using lung-targeted gene therapy that may lead to improved treatments for inherited diseases including emphysema. [More]
FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. [More]
Researchers discover human factor that drives maturation of helper T cells

Researchers discover human factor that drives maturation of helper T cells

A powerful arm of the immune system is production of antibodies that circulate through the blood and neutralize invading pathogens. Although B cells actually manufacture antibody proteins, the process is aided by neighboring T cells, which shower B cells with cytokines to make them churn out high-quality antibody proteins--and remember how to do so. [More]
Advertisement