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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
NIAID funds nine research projects to advance rapid diagnostics tests for drug-resistant bacteria

NIAID funds nine research projects to advance rapid diagnostics tests for drug-resistant bacteria

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded more than $11 million in first-year funding for nine research projects supporting enhanced diagnostics to rapidly detect antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. [More]
Protein-degrading enzyme can trigger strong allergic reactions through skin

Protein-degrading enzyme can trigger strong allergic reactions through skin

Papain is an important industrial protein-degrading enzyme that is used, for example, in the food and cosmetic industries. [More]
Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA

Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA

The virus that causes AIDS is an efficient and crafty retrovirus. Once HIV inserts its DNA into the genome of its host cells, it has a long incubation period, and can remain dormant and hidden for years. [More]
Enhanced biodiversity of worms, germs associated with better immune function, overall health

Enhanced biodiversity of worms, germs associated with better immune function, overall health

A growing body of evidence in the medical community holds that greater diversity of bacteria and even worms in the digestive tract offers protection against a variety of allergic and autoimmune problems. [More]
Phase 1 clinical trial: Anti-HIV antibody significantly decreases HIV levels

Phase 1 clinical trial: Anti-HIV antibody significantly decreases HIV levels

A single infusion of an experimental anti-HIV antibody called 3BNC117 resulted in significantly decreased HIV levels that persisted for as long as 28 days in HIV-infected individuals, according to Phase 1 clinical trial findings published online today in Nature. [More]
New simeprevir clinical data to be presented at EASL's International Liver Congress 2015

New simeprevir clinical data to be presented at EASL's International Liver Congress 2015

Janssen Sciences Ireland UC, one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, today announced that clinical data for simeprevir, its NS3/4A protease inhibitor for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, will be presented at The International Liver Congress 2015 of the European Association for the Study of the Liver taking place in Vienna from April 22-26. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio today revealed the molecular structure of the cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a widespread, highly contagious bacterium that infects the lungs. [More]
MGH investigators identify inflammatory molecule that plays key role in lupus

MGH investigators identify inflammatory molecule that plays key role in lupus

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have identified an inflammatory molecule that appears to play an essential role in the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus, commonly known as lupus. [More]
Scientists identify rhinovirus C receptor associated with severe asthma attacks

Scientists identify rhinovirus C receptor associated with severe asthma attacks

Scientists funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have identified a cellular receptor for rhinovirus C, a cold-causing virus that is strongly associated with severe asthma attacks. [More]
Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

A study published today on the safety of human breast milk bought over the Internet found that 10 percent of samples contained added cow's milk. The discovery that purchased samples of human milk may be purposely "topped off" with cow's milk or infant formula confirms a danger for the large number of babies receiving the purchased milk due to medical conditions. [More]
Canada's VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine proves safe, effective in Phase 1 clinical trial

Canada's VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine proves safe, effective in Phase 1 clinical trial

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, and Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Gregory Taylor, today welcomed the news of promising trial outcomes of Canada's VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine. The results of several studies and trials bring the world closer to ending this global outbreak through the provision of a commercially available vaccine. [More]
EpiPen (epinephrine) emergency kits now available at Montreal Bell Centre for treating severe allergies

EpiPen (epinephrine) emergency kits now available at Montreal Bell Centre for treating severe allergies

Pfizer Canada Inc., the distributor of EpiPen, and the Montreal Bell Centre are pleased to announce that EpiPen (epinephrine) emergency kits are now available at the Bell Centre, home of the Montreal Canadiens hockey team. The new partnership strives to offer a safeguarded environment for visitors at risk of serious allergic reactions during hockey games, concerts and other entertainment events. [More]
New blood test promises to detect food allergies

New blood test promises to detect food allergies

A new blood test promises to predict which people will have severe allergic reactions to foods according to a new study led by Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in the The Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. [More]
New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

New HCV therapies cost-effective in specific groups of HCV-infected patients

A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients. [More]
Study can aid in developing patient-centered interventions for seniors with asthma

Study can aid in developing patient-centered interventions for seniors with asthma

Although often considered a childhood health problem, asthma - a chronic inflammatory disease that causes recurrent cough, wheezing and chest tightness or shortness of breath - can cause serious illness for people age 60 and older, and little is known about the triggers of asthma specific to seniors. [More]
Effective therapy enables immune system recovery in majority of children

Effective therapy enables immune system recovery in majority of children

Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment, according to a new study conducted by researchers at UCLA and other institutions in the U.S. and Brazil. [More]
Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe in PREVAIL clinical trial in Liberia

Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe in PREVAIL clinical trial in Liberia

Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe based on evaluation in more than 600 people in Liberia who participated in the first stage of the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL) Phase 2/3 clinical trial, according to interim findings from an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board review. [More]
Promising clinical trial results for ebola vaccines

Promising clinical trial results for ebola vaccines

Interim findings from a clinical trial (PREVAIL) in which two experimental Ebola vaccines were given to more than 600 people in Liberia indicate that the vaccines are safe for use in humans. Based on these positive results, the vaccines may continue into the next stage of clinical evaluation; a phase 3 trial sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

New Ebola vaccine shows promise in first phase 1 clinical trial

Results from the first phase 1 trial of an Ebola vaccine based on the current (2014) strain of the virus are today published in The Lancet. Until now, all tested Ebola virus vaccines have been based on the virus strain from the Zaire outbreak in 1976. The results suggest that the new vaccine is safe, and provokes an immune response in recipients, although further long-term testing will be needed to establish whether it can protect against the Ebola virus. [More]
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