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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched an early-stage clinical trial of CRS3123, an investigational oral antibiotic intended to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection. [More]
Study: Children on dairy farms run much lower risk of developing allergies

Study: Children on dairy farms run much lower risk of developing allergies

The occurrence of allergic diseases has risen dramatically in Western societies. One frequently cited reason is that children are less exposed to microorganisms and have fewer infections than previous generations, thereby delaying maturation of the immune system. [More]
Study gives parents, doctors new options to treat children with eczema

Study gives parents, doctors new options to treat children with eczema

The number of children with atopic dermatitis, often referred to as eczema, is on the rise. Some estimate that one in five children in the U.S. now suffers from the painful, itchy skin condition. In an effort to control their symptoms, many children are prescribed powerful medications like immunosuppressants or topical steroids. [More]
Researchers identify new genes that likely contribute to asthma

Researchers identify new genes that likely contribute to asthma

In a study published yesterday in the scientific journal Nature Immunology, a group at the La Jolla Institute (LJI) led by Pandurangan Vijayanand, Ph.D. identify new genes that likely contribute to asthma, a disease that currently affects over 200 million people world wide. [More]
Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries on weekends are more likely to die

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries on weekends are more likely to die

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries, such as hernia repairs or appendix removals, on weekends are more likely to suffer complications and even die than children getting the same kind of treatment during the week, according to results of a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. [More]
FSC Laboratories acquires exclusive marketing rights for Aciphex Sprinkle in the U.S.

FSC Laboratories acquires exclusive marketing rights for Aciphex Sprinkle in the U.S.

FSC Therapeutics, LLC, today announced that the Company has entered into a transaction with Eisai Inc. to acquire exclusive U.S. marketing rights for AcipHex® Sprinkle™ (rabeprazole sodium), Delayed-Release Capsules, 5 mg and 10 mg, for the treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in children 1 to 11 years of age for up to 12 weeks. [More]
Host-directed therapy: A new type of TB treatment

Host-directed therapy: A new type of TB treatment

In a new study published in Nature, scientists describe a new type of tuberculosis (TB) treatment that involves manipulating the body's response to TB bacteria rather than targeting the bacteria themselves, a concept called host-directed therapy. [More]
Study shows caregivers' allergy perceptions are not always accurate

Study shows caregivers' allergy perceptions are not always accurate

It's tough being the parent of a child with food allergies. Constant vigilance is needed for everything your child eats, when a single food item containing a hidden ingredient can be fatal. [More]
ASPIRE completes patient enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

ASPIRE completes patient enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

ASPIRE, one of two Phase III trials of a promising method for preventing HIV in women - a vaginal ring worn for a month at a time - has completed enrollment of participants, with 2,629 women from 15 clinical research sites in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe now taking part in the study. [More]
USAMRIID scientists propose new standards to sequence viral genomes

USAMRIID scientists propose new standards to sequence viral genomes

Scientists at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) have proposed a set of standards aimed at developing a common "language" among investigators working to sequence viral genomes and characterize viral stocks. [More]
Henry Ford launches clinical trial for treatment of tinnitus caused by noise trauma

Henry Ford launches clinical trial for treatment of tinnitus caused by noise trauma

Henry Ford Health System has launched a clinical trial to investigate a new drug for the treatment of tinnitus, a chronic ringing of the head or ears that affects more than 600 million people worldwide. [More]
State highlights: Ohio managed care plans launch; Bluecross Blueshield plan faces Ore. lawsuit; N.Y. policy on unvaccinated children upheld

State highlights: Ohio managed care plans launch; Bluecross Blueshield plan faces Ore. lawsuit; N.Y. policy on unvaccinated children upheld

A selection of health policy stories from Ohio, Oregon, New York, Colorado, Iowa, New Jersey, North Carolina, Georgia, California and Minnesota. [More]
Researchers employ mixture of saline and air bubbles to assess fallopian tubes

Researchers employ mixture of saline and air bubbles to assess fallopian tubes

Many women struggling to become pregnant may suffer from some degree of tubal blockage. Traditionally, an x-ray hysterosalpingogram (HSG) that uses dye is the most common procedure to determine whether a blockage exists, but it can cause extreme discomfort to the patient. [More]

Public website promotes health and science applications of 3D printing

The National Institutes of Health has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, a public website that enables users to share, download and edit 3D print files related to health and science. [More]
La Jolla Institute researchers advance work toward vaccine for heart disease

La Jolla Institute researchers advance work toward vaccine for heart disease

Research toward the world's first vaccine for heart disease continues to advance at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, with researchers demonstrating significant arterial plaque reduction in concept testing in mice. [More]

Survey uncovers how summertime congestion and illness can interfere with outdoor fun

For many, the battle with nasal congestion can linger beyond spring allergy season and into the summer months. As the first day of summer approaches, the makers of ARM & HAMMER™ Simply Saline™, the #1 brand of saline-based nasal mists, conducted a nationwide survey to uncover how summertime congestion and illness can interfere with outdoor fun and family vacations. [More]
Tips to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom and on sports field

Tips to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom and on sports field

Your kids may be enjoying the lazy days of summer, but if they have asthma, allergies - or both - they need to be prepared for back-to-school. And so do their classrooms. More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and 11 percent suffer from respiratory allergies. About 6 percent have also been diagnosed with food allergies. [More]
Type I interferons can block development of allergy- and asthma-driving Th2 cells

Type I interferons can block development of allergy- and asthma-driving Th2 cells

A mechanism that could underlie the development of cells that drive asthma and allergies has been uncovered by immunology researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Study shows significantly increased risk of heart attack in patients with Sj-gren's syndrome

Study shows significantly increased risk of heart attack in patients with Sj-gren's syndrome

A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) showed a significantly increased risk of heart attack in patients with Sj-gren's syndrome (SjS), particularly in the first year following diagnosis. [More]
BRI researchers use tetramer technology to find T cells that drive rheumatoid arthritis

BRI researchers use tetramer technology to find T cells that drive rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason used cutting-edge tetramer technology developed at BRI to find the T cells that drive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). "By using tetramer technology, we were able to examine whether T cells in people with rheumatoid arthritis were increased in number or were unique in other ways," says BRI Associate Director Jane Buckner, MD, who led the study with BRI Tetramer Core Laboratory Manager Eddie James, PhD. [More]