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PD-1-responsive T cells may offer clues to design more effective drugs for cancer

PD-1-responsive T cells may offer clues to design more effective drugs for cancer

Cancer immunotherapy drugs that block the inhibitory PD-1 pathway have shown success in clinical trials and are now FDA-approved for melanoma, lung cancer and bladder cancer. Yet many patients' tumors do not respond to these drugs. [More]
New research aims to understand, manage contact lens discomfort

New research aims to understand, manage contact lens discomfort

Do you have dry eyes or other symptoms related to wearing contact lenses? If so you're not alone—up to 50 percent of contact lens wearers experience dryness or discomfort at least occasionally. [More]
ACAAI offers tips to help prevent kids from suffering through allergy and asthma attacks

ACAAI offers tips to help prevent kids from suffering through allergy and asthma attacks

You work hard to keep your child's allergies and asthma under control. You clean to get rid of dust mites and pet dander, and you make sure your kids are taking the right medications at the right time. Then you send them off to school and your routine can fall apart, leaving your child with symptoms that aren't controlled. [More]
New drug prevents vaginal and oral transmission of HIV in pre-clinical animal models

New drug prevents vaginal and oral transmission of HIV in pre-clinical animal models

HIV remains a major health concern for women and children globally. Worldwide, the majority of new HIV infections occur in young women. Each year, 1.5 million women living with HIV become pregnant. [More]
Researchers identify key immune differences that could help in development of effective HIV vaccine

Researchers identify key immune differences that could help in development of effective HIV vaccine

One of the main mysteries confounding development of an HIV vaccine is why some people infected with the virus make the desired antibodies after several years, but a vaccine can't seem to induce the same response. [More]
Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. [More]
Vaccination against single strain could confer protection against diverse Zika virus infections

Vaccination against single strain could confer protection against diverse Zika virus infections

Vaccination against a single strain of Zika virus should be sufficient to protect against genetically diverse strains of the virus, according to a study conducted by investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health; Washington University in St. Louis; and Emory University in Atlanta. [More]
World's largest public-private partnership focuses on tackling antibiotic resistance

World's largest public-private partnership focuses on tackling antibiotic resistance

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Wellcome Trust of London, the AMR Centre of Alderley Park, Cheshire in the United Kingdom and Boston University School of Law today announced the establishment of one of the world's largest public-private partnerships focused on tackling antibiotic resistance, an emerging modern threat to public health worldwide. [More]
Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

When a patient is diagnosed with eczema, the diagnosis of another medical condition may not be far behind. [More]
Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

A study led by researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles suggests that maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of their HIV-uninfected infants. [More]
NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has begun an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against yellow fever virus. [More]
Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

In our latest report – The Battle for Breath – the impact of lung disease in the UK, figures suggest that 1 in 5 (around 12.7 million) have been diagnosed with a lung condition in the UK. If you’re over the age of 70, this rises to 1 in 3. [More]
Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

A new study may explain why people who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy nevertheless experience a variety of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms after ingesting wheat and related cereals. [More]
Scientists seek to understand impact of pollution on seasonal allergies

Scientists seek to understand impact of pollution on seasonal allergies

A unique collaboration between University of Manchester Scientists is set to advance our understanding of how polluted cities impact on seasonal allergies. [More]
Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

A newly identified requirement of a modified human protein in ebolavirus (EBOV) replication, may unlock the door for new approaches to treating Ebola. [More]
Scientists clarify mechanism of defective immune defense in G6PD patients

Scientists clarify mechanism of defective immune defense in G6PD patients

Favism is a common hereditary disease, affecting around 400 million people worldwide. It is caused by a lack of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). [More]
Exposure to atmospheric dust, high temperatures can increase risk of bacterial meningitis

Exposure to atmospheric dust, high temperatures can increase risk of bacterial meningitis

Exposure to airborne dust and high temperatures are significant risk factors for bacterial meningitis, a new study by the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health has found. [More]
Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. [More]
Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

A better understanding of HIV latency is the key to eradicating the virus researchers at the University of North Carolina and partner institutions write in a perspective in the journal Science. [More]
Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Research published today in the journal, Nature Communications, provides new insights into the evolution of Mucorales fungi, which cause a fatal infection in ever-increasing segments of patient population, and several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic or diagnostic targets. [More]
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