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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Researchers develop user-friendly platform for analyzing transcriptomic and epigenomic big data

Researchers develop user-friendly platform for analyzing transcriptomic and epigenomic big data

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have developed a user-friendly, integrated platform for analyzing the transcriptomic and epigenomic "big data." [More]
Researchers discover way to prevent flu infection without any help from the virus

Researchers discover way to prevent flu infection without any help from the virus

Researchers have discovered a way to trigger a preventive response to a flu infection without any help from the usual players - the virus itself or interferon, a powerful infection fighter. [More]
New Johns Hopkins study shows hepatitis C infection may spell heart trouble

New Johns Hopkins study shows hepatitis C infection may spell heart trouble

People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble. [More]
Researchers apply new approach to make improved nasal spray flu vaccine

Researchers apply new approach to make improved nasal spray flu vaccine

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say they have developed a method that could make a nasal spray flu vaccine effective for those under two and over 49 - two groups for which the vaccine is not approved. [More]
Experts discuss ways to encourage appropriate use of epinephrine for all severe allergic reactions

Experts discuss ways to encourage appropriate use of epinephrine for all severe allergic reactions

There are times when emergency physicians can't be 100 percent sure a person is suffering from a severe allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis, and may hesitate to use epinephrine. A new article says when in doubt - administer the epinephrine. [More]
Pennsylvania physicians examine back-to-school health, offer tips for parents and students

Pennsylvania physicians examine back-to-school health, offer tips for parents and students

As students start heading back to classes for the upcoming academic year, Pennsylvania physicians take a close look at back-to-school health and offer some tips for parents and students who strive to stay in class and not home in bed sick. [More]
Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

National Institutes of Health scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if given three days prior. [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
Rice University scientists identify genetic mechanism that allows bacteria to resist antibiotics

Rice University scientists identify genetic mechanism that allows bacteria to resist antibiotics

Rice University scientists are developing strategies to keep germs from evolving resistance to antibiotics by heading them off at the pass. [More]
European Commission grants orphan drug designation to SGX301 for treatment of CTCL

European Commission grants orphan drug designation to SGX301 for treatment of CTCL

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that the European Commission, acting on the positive recommendation from the European Medicines Agency Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products (COMP), has granted orphan drug designation to synthetic hypericin (the active pharmaceutical ingredient in SGX301) for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), a rare disease and a class of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a type of cancer of the white blood cells that are an integral part of the immune system. [More]
Northwestern gets $17.5 million NIH grant to invent, develop implantable drug delivery system for HIV prevention

Northwestern gets $17.5 million NIH grant to invent, develop implantable drug delivery system for HIV prevention

Northwestern Medicine scientists have received a five-year, $17.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for an interdisciplinary project that aims to invent, develop and test an implantable drug delivery system to protect high-risk individuals from HIV infection for up to a year at a time. [More]
Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines - creating immunity without vaccination. [More]
Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

Vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles could be novel treatment option for RSV

A vaccine containing virus-like nanoparticles, or microscopic, genetically engineered particles, is an effective treatment for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Soligenix signs $10M equity purchase agreement with accredited institutional investors

Soligenix signs $10M equity purchase agreement with accredited institutional investors

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that it has entered into a $10 million equity purchase agreement with accredited institutional investors, Kodiak Capital Group, LLC, Kingsbrook Opportunities Master Fund LP and River North Equity, LLC. [More]
Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome. [More]
Researchers uncover master regulators that govern the fate of TFH cells

Researchers uncover master regulators that govern the fate of TFH cells

Follicular helper Tcells (TFH cells), a rare type of immune cell that is essential for inducing a strong and lasting antibody response to viruses and other microbes, have garnered intense interest in recent years but the molecular signals that drive their differentiation had remained unclear. [More]
Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. Vaccinated mice produced broadly neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), while vaccinated macaques were protected from severe lung damage when later exposed to MERS-CoV. [More]
Does dandruff cause psychological distress? An interview with Dr Anjali Mahto

Does dandruff cause psychological distress? An interview with Dr Anjali Mahto

Dandruff is a common chronic scalp disorder that is characterised by flaking of the skin of the scalp. As skin cells die, they are shed from the scalp surface. For some people, however, excessive flaking occurs, resulting in dandruff. [More]
Wayne State leads landmark study that examines clinical use of polymyxin B to treat superbugs

Wayne State leads landmark study that examines clinical use of polymyxin B to treat superbugs

With the decline of the development of new antibiotics due to the complexity and expense of discovering them, there has been a rapid growth of antibiotic resistant pathogens that is one of the leading causes of death. With the help of a nearly $4.9 million, 5-year grant from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health, Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers are leading a landmark multi-center, international study that will provide essential information to clinicians for use of polymoxin B in critically ill patients where no other treatments will work. [More]
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
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