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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.

NIH study could offer clues for developing new antiviral treatments

A National Institutes of Health study reports that a rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections. [More]
Food experts to discuss pros and cons of GM crops at Food Integrity and Traceability Conference

Food experts to discuss pros and cons of GM crops at Food Integrity and Traceability Conference

One of the world's most contentious food issues - Genetically Modified (GM) crops - will be debated by some of the world's leading authorities on the subject at Queen's University Belfast today (Wednesday day 9 April). [More]

Scientists seek broad, versatile countermeasures effective against several kinds of viruses, other pathogens

​A group of University of Washington scientists is seeking broad, versatile countermeasures effective against several different kinds of viruses and other pathogens. The investigators are part of a national push for faster responses to unexpected infectious agents. [More]
Antimicrobial agent in personal care products boosts colonization of bacteria inside human noses

Antimicrobial agent in personal care products boosts colonization of bacteria inside human noses

An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection. [More]

Cincinnati Children's Hospital doc suggests tips to combat allergy symptoms

One of the problems that parents may have during the springtime is deciphering whether their children's sneezing is due to a cold or allergies. [More]

Food allergies are closely linked to spring allergies, says allergist

The Midwest's high tree pollen count is primarily birch and oak, bad news for carrot, celery and almond lovers. "It's healthy if certain foods make your mouth water but it is unhealthy if foods make your nose run or your gums and throat itch," says Joseph Leija, MD, allergist who performs the Gottlieb Allergy Count, the official allergy count for the Midwest. [More]
Research roundup: Mental health parity; nurses' workload; can restaurants reduce portion size?

Research roundup: Mental health parity; nurses' workload; can restaurants reduce portion size?

Historically, health insurance covered mental health care differently than other medical care. Recent laws have begun bringing them into balance. ... Congress passed the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) in 2008. ... the MHPAEA applied to large group health plans, both fully and self-insured, and included a cost exemption. [More]
New insights provide novel therapeutic approach against cancer

New insights provide novel therapeutic approach against cancer

A major discovery that brings a new drug target to the increasingly exciting landscape of cancer immunotherapy was published yesterday by researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and their collaborators from other institutes. [More]

New "3D" method could reduce the need for animal testing

To determine whether new medicines are safe and effective for humans, researchers must first test them in animals, which is costly and time-consuming, as well as ethically challenging. [More]
Sanaria receives 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for "Best Prophylactic Vaccine"

Sanaria receives 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for "Best Prophylactic Vaccine"

Sanaria received the 2014 Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for the "Best Prophylactic Vaccine" at a ceremony held March 25 in Washington DC during the 14th World Vaccine Congress. [More]
Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Study finds that stress can make allergies worse

Stress doesn't cause allergies, but easing your mind might mean less allergy flare-ups this spring. According to a study published in the April issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergy sufferers with persistent stress experience more allergy flares. [More]
FDA approves ORALAIR sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet

FDA approves ORALAIR sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet

GREER Laboratories, Inc., a leading developer and provider of allergy immunotherapy products and services, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved ORALAIR (Sweet Vernal, Orchard, Perennial Rye, Timothy and Kentucky Blue Grass Mixed Pollens Allergen Extract) sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet. [More]
Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

​There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction - ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. [More]

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]

Redesigned medication alerts in EMR reduce prescribing errors, increase efficiency

Changing how medication alerts are presented in electronic medical records resulted in safer prescribing, increased efficiency and reduced workload for health care providers who placed drug orders in a study published online in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have identified a protein that regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. [More]
Tips to avoid eye irritation and longer-term damage to eyes during allergy season

Tips to avoid eye irritation and longer-term damage to eyes during allergy season

With the advent of spring comes wind and allergy season, which can prove to be challenging for individuals who rely on contact lenses for clearer vision. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, approximately 1 out of 5 individuals in the United States suffer from eye allergies, while nearly half of all individuals who wear contact lenses report irritation and discomfort from wearing contacts during allergy season. [More]
Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears linked with JC virus (JCV) infection, which can lead to a rare and often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) that destroys the myelin that protects nerve cells. [More]

IDRI awarded grant extension of $3.4M for identifying new leads and drug targets for tuberculosis

IDRI's​ drug discovery efforts continue to grow with a recently awarded grant extension of $3.4 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The additional funding was awarded to Tanya Parish, Ph.D., IDRI's Vice President of Drug Discovery, and supplements an earlier grant awarded in 2010, for a total of $7.8 million. [More]

Drugs fail to "wake up" dormant reservoirs of HIV inside immune system T cells

Scientists at Johns Hopkins report that compounds they hoped would "wake up" dormant reservoirs of HIV inside immune system T cells - a strategy designed to reverse latency and make the cells vulnerable to destruction - have failed to do so in laboratory tests of such white blood cells taken directly from patients infected with HIV. [More]