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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Dual treatment strategies lengthen lives of mice with skin cancer

Dual treatment strategies lengthen lives of mice with skin cancer

By combining two treatment strategies, both aimed at boosting the immune system's killer T cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report they lengthened the lives of mice with skin cancer more than by using either strategy on its own. [More]
Researchers engineer promising live-attenuated RSV vaccine candidate

Researchers engineer promising live-attenuated RSV vaccine candidate

Crafting a vaccine against RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) has been a minefield for 50 years, but scientists believe they have found the right balance. [More]
OPERA study evaluates patient perceptions of pain treatment with use of transdermal formulations

OPERA study evaluates patient perceptions of pain treatment with use of transdermal formulations

​Clarity, a global international scientific research company, based in Austin, Texas, announces the latest results of its IRB-approved OPERA study. [More]
Contact dermatitis or contact eczema?

Contact dermatitis or contact eczema?

There is allergic contact dermatitis, which is mediated through an immune mechanism, this means that the person is specifically allergic to what they have come in to contact with their skin. Their body has had to go through a process whereby they have... [More]
First large-scale clinical study of long-acting injectable HIV drug begins

First large-scale clinical study of long-acting injectable HIV drug begins

The first large-scale clinical trial of a long-acting injectable drug for HIV prevention began today. [More]
Researchers identify promising prospect for new medications to fight against H. pylori

Researchers identify promising prospect for new medications to fight against H. pylori

There is a strong suspicion that Helicobacter pylori is linked to the development of stomach cancer. Now an international team of researchers led by Prof. Donald R. Ronning has used neutrons to unlock the secret to the functionality of an important enzyme in the bacterium's metabolism. [More]
Anticholinergic drugs linked to increased rate of emergency department and hospital visits

Anticholinergic drugs linked to increased rate of emergency department and hospital visits

Anticholinergic medications, a class of drugs very commonly used by older adults, are linked to an increased rate of emergency department and hospital utilization in the United States, according to an Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Indiana University Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, and Regenstrief Institute study of community-dwelling Americans age 65 and older. [More]
Zika-linked abnormalities in fetuses more extensive and severe than previously thought

Zika-linked abnormalities in fetuses more extensive and severe than previously thought

New UCLA-led research finds that Zika-linked abnormalities that occur in human fetuses are more extensive — and severe — than previously thought, with 46 percent of 125 pregnancies among Zika-infected women resulting in birth defects in newborns or ending in fetal death. [More]
NIH scientists create Salmonella-infected mouse model to study life-threatening meningitis

NIH scientists create Salmonella-infected mouse model to study life-threatening meningitis

National Institutes of Healthscientists have established in mice a way to study potentially life-threatening meningitis caused by Salmonella. [More]
Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics

Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics

During the winter months, patients frequently present with respiratory symptoms like coughing, sneezing and fever that could be caused by one of several bacterial and viral infections including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or bacterial pneumonia. [More]
Researchers identify protein that degrades and inhibits infectious biofilms

Researchers identify protein that degrades and inhibits infectious biofilms

Many infectious pathogens are difficult to treat because they develop into biofilms, layers of metabolically active but slowly growing bacteria embedded in a protective layer of slime, which are inherently more resistant to antibiotics. [More]
New mathematical model suggests how AD may progress to become chronic

New mathematical model suggests how AD may progress to become chronic

Successive flare-ups of the most common form of eczema may trigger an immune system overreaction, causing it to become a long-term condition in people. [More]
New UTMB study sheds light on how Ebola effectively disables immune system

New UTMB study sheds light on how Ebola effectively disables immune system

A new study at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston sheds light on how Ebola so effectively disables the human immune system. [More]
MILabs to provide Adaptive X-ray CT system to UAB for advancing pulmonary research

MILabs to provide Adaptive X-ray CT system to UAB for advancing pulmonary research

MILabs will provide an advanced U-CTUHR microCT system to the Cystic Fibrosis Research Center (CFRC) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). [More]
NIH-supported first HIV vaccine efficacy study begins in South Africa

NIH-supported first HIV vaccine efficacy study begins in South Africa

The first HIV vaccine efficacy study to launch anywhere in seven years is now testing whether an experimental vaccine regimen safely prevents HIV infection among South African adults. [More]
Leading nonprofit patient education organization offers allergy-related restaurant safety tips

Leading nonprofit patient education organization offers allergy-related restaurant safety tips

Eating out is an American pastime - but for the millions of Americans with food or latex allergies, navigating the maze of restaurant and menu options can prove challenging, especially during the hustle and bustle of the holidays. [More]
Study shines new light on genetic makeup of river blindness parasite

Study shines new light on genetic makeup of river blindness parasite

The parasite that causes river blindness infects about 37 million people in parts of Africa and Latin America, causing blindness and other major eye and skin diseases in about 5 million of them. [More]
Experts characterize racial and ethnic differences in food allergies among U.S. children

Experts characterize racial and ethnic differences in food allergies among U.S. children

Allergy and immunology experts at Rush University Medical Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have conducted the first study designed to assess and characterize the racial and ethnic difference in food allergies among children in the U.S. [More]
Study highlights potential to develop antiviral therapies, vaccines for treating astroviruses

Study highlights potential to develop antiviral therapies, vaccines for treating astroviruses

Human astroviruses infect nearly everyone during childhood, causing diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. [More]
Researchers sequence genome of parasitic worm that causes river blindness

Researchers sequence genome of parasitic worm that causes river blindness

Scientists have sequenced the genome of the parasitic worm responsible for causing onchocerciasis--an eye and skin infection more commonly known as river blindness. [More]
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