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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Food allergies more common in young inner-city children

Food allergies more common in young inner-city children

Already known for their higher-than-usual risk of asthma and environmental allergies, young inner-city children appear to suffer disproportionately from food allergies as well, according to results of a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. [More]
Ebola virus defeats attempts by interferon to block viral reproduction in infected cells

Ebola virus defeats attempts by interferon to block viral reproduction in infected cells

One of the human body's first responses to a viral infection is to make and release signaling proteins called interferons, which amplify the immune system response to viruses. [More]
Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment. [More]
Physiological variables best predict adult asthma phenotypes

Physiological variables best predict adult asthma phenotypes

Physiological variables are more consistent predictors of adult asthma phenotypes than inflammatory biomarkers, an international team of researchers suggests. [More]
Dangerous air quality alert issued due to high mold count

Dangerous air quality alert issued due to high mold count

A dangerous air quality alert was called today due to the extremely high count for mold detected in the Gottlieb Allergy Count. [More]
Bacteria may depend more on gastrointestinal age than on environmental factors in babies

Bacteria may depend more on gastrointestinal age than on environmental factors in babies

Scientists believe babies are born with digestive systems containing few or no bacteria. Their guts then quickly become colonized by microbes — good and bad — as they nurse or take bottles, receive medication and even as they are passed from one adoring relative to another. [More]
Injecting vaccine-like compound into mice effective in protecting from malaria

Injecting vaccine-like compound into mice effective in protecting from malaria

A study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that injecting a vaccine-like compound into mice was effective in protecting them from malaria. [More]
New method could make cashews safer for people with allergies

New method could make cashews safer for people with allergies

For the millions of adults and children in the U.S. who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews - and potentially other nuts - that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them. [More]
Soligenix demonstrates improved immunogenicity and rapid action of anthrax vaccine, VeloThrax

Soligenix demonstrates improved immunogenicity and rapid action of anthrax vaccine, VeloThrax

Soligenix, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing products to treat serious inflammatory diseases where there remains an unmet medical need, as well as developing several biodefense vaccines and therapeutics, announced today results demonstrating the improved immunogenicity and rapid action of its anthrax vaccine, VeloThrax™. [More]
Ragweed pollen reported for first time in 2014 allergy reporting season

Ragweed pollen reported for first time in 2014 allergy reporting season

Later summer triggers ragweed allergies in 10 to 20 percent of Americans and today spells misery for those with sensitive systems. Ragweed pollen was reported for the first time in the 2014 allergy reporting season, causing a pollen vortex of sneezing, itching and headaches for Midwesterners. [More]
Repurposed drug used to treat ovarian cancer gives positive results

Repurposed drug used to treat ovarian cancer gives positive results

A repurposed drug originally used to treat ovarian cancer saw positive results for patients with advanced peritoneal cancers during a phase I clinical trial at The University of Kansas Cancer Center. [More]
Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

UC San Francisco is the lead institution on a new seven-year, $17 million multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health to determine if certain immune system cells and/or a drug now used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can be effective in improving and maintaining the long-term health of kidney transplant recipients. [More]
ACAAI offers practical solutions to improve asthma problem in older women

ACAAI offers practical solutions to improve asthma problem in older women

Women over the age of 65 face numerous barriers to good health: an increased risk for obesity, greater struggles against poverty and higher rates of asthma with worse health outcomes. [More]
Study: Spicy capsaicin can reduce risk of colorectal tumors

Study: Spicy capsaicin can reduce risk of colorectal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin - the active ingredient in chili peppers - produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors. [More]
New guidelines help allergist steer patient out of yellow zone and back into green

New guidelines help allergist steer patient out of yellow zone and back into green

If you have asthma, you may have an asthma action plan with a "stoplight system" to help you recognize and respond to changes and understand when symptoms are getting worse and need more attention. [More]
Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Your kids may be enjoying the lazy days of summer, but if they have asthma, allergies, or both, they need to be prepared for back-to-school. And so do their classrooms. More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and 11 percent suffer from respiratory allergies. About 6 percent have also been diagnosed with food allergies. [More]
Combination therapy effective in treating drug-resistant malaria

Combination therapy effective in treating drug-resistant malaria

Resistance to artemisinin, the main drug to treat malaria, is now widespread throughout Southeast Asia, among the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) parasites that cause the disease and is likely caused by a genetic mutation in the parasites. [More]
ChromaDex to provide Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with NR ingredient for research use

ChromaDex to provide Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with NR ingredient for research use

ChromaDex Corp., an innovative natural products company that provides proprietary ingredients and science-based solutions to the dietary supplement, food and beverage, animal health, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries, announced today it has entered into a material transfer agreement (MTA) with Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, the preeminent child health research institute in Australia. [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

About 100 drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other purposes can also prevent the growth of certain bacterial pathogens inside human cells, including those that cause Legionnaires' disease, brucellosis, and Mediterranean spotted fever. [More]