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The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
Magnetic nanoparticles may hold key to bringing immunotherapy into successful clinical use

Magnetic nanoparticles may hold key to bringing immunotherapy into successful clinical use

In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection. Now, results of a study led by Johns Hopkins investigators suggests that a device composed of a magnetic column paired with custom-made magnetic nanoparticles may hold a key to bringing immunotherapy into widespread and successful clinical use. [More]
AnaptysBio announces completion of oversubscribed $40MM Series D financing round

AnaptysBio announces completion of oversubscribed $40MM Series D financing round

AnaptysBio, Inc., a leader in the discovery and development of therapeutic antibodies for inflammation and immuno-oncology, today announced the completion of an oversubscribed $40MM Series D financing round. [More]
IU researcher plays role in recent FDA approval of Neupogen drug to treat people exposed to radiation

IU researcher plays role in recent FDA approval of Neupogen drug to treat people exposed to radiation

An Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center researcher played a role in the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of a drug to treat people exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. [More]
Microbiota blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies

Microbiota blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies

The human body is inhabited by billions of symbiotic bacteria, carrying a diversity that is unique to each individual. The microbiota is involved in many mechanisms, including digestion, vitamin synthesis and host defense. [More]
University of Chicago Medicine named to FARE Clinical Network

University of Chicago Medicine named to FARE Clinical Network

The University of Chicago Medicine is among 22 centers of excellence across the country chosen by Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) to be inaugural members of its FARE Clinical Network, which will work to accelerate development of therapies and raise the standard of care for people with life-threating food allergies. [More]
Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]
New research reveals why some kids can have severe allergic reaction hours later

New research reveals why some kids can have severe allergic reaction hours later

Parents of kids with severe allergies know how scary a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) is. New research offers clues as to why some kids can have a second, related reaction hours later - and what to do about it. [More]
Southern Research receives $22 million to support HIV cure initiative

Southern Research receives $22 million to support HIV cure initiative

Southern Research has been awarded a seven-year contract of up to $22 million to support research that could contribute to the cure of HIV disease. Under this contract, Southern Research will develop and standardize assays that quantitate latent reservoirs of HIV. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Investigators have discovered the precise molecular steps that enable immune cells implicated in certain forms of asthma and allergy to develop and survive in the body. The findings from Weill Cornell Medical College reveal a new pathway that scientists could use to develop more effective treatments and therapies for the chronic lung disorder. [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trial evaluates new investigational vaccine against West Nile Virus infection

NIH-sponsored clinical trial evaluates new investigational vaccine against West Nile Virus infection

A clinical trial of a new investigational vaccine designed to protect against West Nile Virus infection will be sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Celtaxsys receives FDA clearance to begin acebilustat Phase 2 trial in adult CF patients in the US

Celtaxsys receives FDA clearance to begin acebilustat Phase 2 trial in adult CF patients in the US

Celtaxsys, Inc., a clinical stage pharmaceutical development company focusing on anti-inflammatory therapeutics, including those with rare and orphan inflammatory disease indications, announced today that it has gained clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin a Phase 2 clinical trial of its flagship drug candidate, acebilustat (CTX-4430), in adult CF patients in the US. [More]
Biologically active molecules produced during gluten digestion can pass through gut lining

Biologically active molecules produced during gluten digestion can pass through gut lining

Biologically active molecules released by digesting bread and pasta can survive digestion and potentially pass through the gut lining, suggests new research. [More]
Galderma obtains FDA approval for Restylane Lyft to restore structure to the cheeks and midface area

Galderma obtains FDA approval for Restylane Lyft to restore structure to the cheeks and midface area

Galderma, a global healthcare company focused on skin health, announced today that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to market Restylane Lyft for cheek augmentation and the correction of age-related midface contour deficiencies in patients over the age of 21. [More]
UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

The University of Chicago Medicine and Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers are partnering to expand care for infants and children by developing a subspecialty center on the community hospital's Evergreen Park campus that will provide enhanced neonatology and pediatric services. [More]
STIOLTO RESPIMAT Inhalation Spray now available for treatment of COPD across the U.S.

STIOLTO RESPIMAT Inhalation Spray now available for treatment of COPD across the U.S.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that STIOLTO RESPIMAT (tiotropium bromide and olodaterol) Inhalation Spray is now available by prescription at pharmacies across the United States. [More]
New technique that mines Twitter data can help identify potentially dangerous drug interactions

New technique that mines Twitter data can help identify potentially dangerous drug interactions

A team of scientists has invented a new technique for discovering potentially dangerous drug interactions and unknown side-effects — before they show up in medical databases, like PubMed, or even before doctors and researchers have heard of them at all. [More]
Researchers complete participants’ enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

Researchers complete participants’ enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

In a first for HIV prevention, an international team of researchers have completed follow-up of participants enrolled in a pivotal Phase III trial that tested the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring for preventing HIV in women. [More]
New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovery of just how a certain tumor suppressor molecule works to prevent tumor growth could lead to a personalized treatment approach for colon cancer. [More]
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