Allergy News and Research RSS Feed - Allergy News and Research

The term allergy encompasses a wide range of conditions; it is not a disease in itself. In 1906 Clemens von Pirquet was the first to describe allergies as a changed or altered reaction of the immune system in response to exposure to foreign proteins. These days the term allergy – medically termed hypersensitivity, signifies an exaggerated reaction to foreign substances.
New antibody in HIV-infected person binds to virus

New antibody in HIV-infected person binds to virus

An NIH-led team of scientists has discovered a new vulnerability in the armor of HIV that a vaccine, other preventive regimen or treatment could exploit. [More]
Study suggests phages are sophisticated bacterial predators and can prevent infections

Study suggests phages are sophisticated bacterial predators and can prevent infections

In the battle between our immune systems and cholera bacteria, humans may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. [More]
Soligenix announces promising preliminary results from study on ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix announces promising preliminary results from study on ricin toxin vaccine

Soligenix, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing products to treat serious inflammatory diseases where there remains an unmet medical need, as well as developing several biodefense vaccines and therapeutics, announced today promising preliminary results from a preclinical study with its ricin toxin vaccine RiVax™, in a non-human primate (NHP) lethal aerosol exposure model. [More]
Semi-soft vaginal suppository provides drug-delivery vehicle to prevent spread of HIV

Semi-soft vaginal suppository provides drug-delivery vehicle to prevent spread of HIV

A unique method for delivering compounds that could positively impact the global battle against HIV and AIDS may be possible, thanks to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. [More]
Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

The current method to treat acute toxin poisoning is to inject antibodies, commonly produced in animals, to neutralize the toxin. But this method has challenges ranging from safety to difficulties in developing, producing and maintaining the anti-serums in large quantities. [More]
International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. [More]
Damp and mould in homes pose significant health risk to people with asthma

Damp and mould in homes pose significant health risk to people with asthma

Damp and mould in homes could pose a significant health risk to people with asthma according to a new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. [More]
High dew point triggers air quality alert for dangerous levels of mold in the Midwest

High dew point triggers air quality alert for dangerous levels of mold in the Midwest

The heavy rains, hot temperatures and high dew point have triggered an air quality alert for dangerous levels of mold in the Midwest. "The interior mold exposure for homes experiencing flooding or water seepage will be even more toxic," warns Joseph Leija, MD, allergist who performs the Gottlieb Allergy Count, the official daily allergy count for the Midwest. [More]
UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

UAB scientist receives R01 grant to study transmission of deadly bacteria from mothers to infants

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry will study the transmission of a bacteria that up to 40 percent of healthy women carry, which becomes deadly when passed on to infants during birth. [More]
Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level NSAIDs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects. [More]
Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, and Nationwide Children's Hospital announced the signing of an exclusive, world-wide agreement with ENTvantage Diagnostics Inc. licensing a technology for rapid diagnosing of bacterial sinusitis. [More]
OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
Houston Methodist researchers receive $1.6M from NIH to study pathological antibodies

Houston Methodist researchers receive $1.6M from NIH to study pathological antibodies

Transplant immunologists at the Houston Methodist Research Institute will receive about $1.6 million over four years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study pathological antibodies produced from activated memory B cells during the chronic rejection of organ transplants. [More]
NASA study reveals how spaceflight affects immune system of crew members

NASA study reveals how spaceflight affects immune system of crew members

There is nothing like a head cold to make us feel a little dazed. We get things like colds and the flu because of changes in our immune system. Researchers have a good idea what causes immune system changes on Earth-think stress, inadequate sleep and improper nutrition. [More]
New research finds that early use of antibiotics can alter immunity later on

New research finds that early use of antibiotics can alter immunity later on

New University of British Columbia research found that receiving antibiotic treatments early in life can increase susceptibility to specific diseases later on. [More]
ITS develops new T cell vaccine to protect humans from seasonal and pandemic influenza A

ITS develops new T cell vaccine to protect humans from seasonal and pandemic influenza A

Immune Targeting Systems, specializing in the development of novel T cell immune therapies, has been developing an exciting new T cell vaccine (FlunisynTM) designed to protect humans from all strains of seasonal and pandemic influenza A. [More]