Amino Acid News and Research RSS Feed - Amino Acid News and Research

Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Latest findings regarding nitric oxide offer new avenues to save lives

Professor Jonathan Stamler's latest findings regarding nitric oxide have the potential to reshape fundamentally the way we think about the respiratory system - and offer new avenues to save lives. It may be time to rewrite the textbooks. [More]
Biologists discover vulnerability of brain cancer cells

Biologists discover vulnerability of brain cancer cells

Biologists at MIT and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have discovered a vulnerability of brain cancer cells that could be exploited to develop more-effective drugs against brain tumors. [More]
Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease. [More]
Bruker’s new Wine and Honey screeners deliver easy, comprehensive cost efficient analysis

Bruker’s new Wine and Honey screeners deliver easy, comprehensive cost efficient analysis

The inherent ease of use allows non-expert users to conduct analyses from measurement to final report in minutes and without chromatography. [More]
MSU scientists identify antioxidant system that backs up liver during crisis

MSU scientists identify antioxidant system that backs up liver during crisis

Scientists from Montana State University and Sweden have discovered an antioxidant system that helps sustain the liver when other systems are missing or compromised. [More]
UZH researchers map spinal cord neurons involved in 'Gate Control Theory' of pain

UZH researchers map spinal cord neurons involved in 'Gate Control Theory' of pain

Sensing pain is extremely unpleasant and sometimes hard to bear - and pain can even become chronic. The perception of pain varies a lot depending on the context in which it is experienced. 50 years ago, neurobiologist Patrick Wall and psychologist Ronald Melzack formulated the so-called "Gate Control Theory" of pain. [More]
New range of purified, soluble immunoreceptors announced by AMSBIO

New range of purified, soluble immunoreceptors announced by AMSBIO

AMSBIO has announced a new range of purified, soluble immunoreceptors involved in key signalling pathways. Together with new indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) assay kits these products that can be used to screen for inhibitors of protein-protein interaction, as well as neutralizing antibodies that serve as positive controls for inhibition. [More]
Researchers develop 'warhead' molecule that targets deadly bacteria, spares healthy cells

Researchers develop 'warhead' molecule that targets deadly bacteria, spares healthy cells

Targeting deadly, drug-resistant bacteria poses a serious challenge to researchers looking for antibiotics that can kill pathogens without causing collateral damage in human cells. [More]
Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Until now there have been few molecular epidemiological studies regarding the effects of weight changes on metabolism in the general population. In a recent study conducted and funded within the framework of the Competence Network Obesity, researchers at the Institute of Epidemiology II at Helmholtz Zentrum München evaluated molecular data of the KORA study. [More]

NMR screening solution specifically for the analysis of honey launched by Bruker

This new NMR screening solution specifically for the analysis of honey is the most recent module of Bruker’s well-established FoodScreener™ product line to be released in April. [More]
Researchers one step closer to unraveling complex processes crucial to sperm development

Researchers one step closer to unraveling complex processes crucial to sperm development

Researchers are one step closer to unraveling the extraordinarily complex series of processes that leads to an event crucial to human reproduction: the creation of sperm. [More]
Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids may optimize brain serotonin concentrations and function

Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids may optimize brain serotonin concentrations and function

Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders. [More]
UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists have developed a peptide that sticks to the protein that causes Parkinson's disease, stopping it from killing brain cells. The research highlights a potential new route for slowing the progress of this incurable disease. [More]
Microbes prevent malnutrition in fruit flies - and maybe humans too

Microbes prevent malnutrition in fruit flies - and maybe humans too

A study by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) sheds significant new light on a surprising and critical role that microbes may play in nutritional disorders such as protein malnutrition.

Using fruit flies—Drosophila melanogaster—as a simple and easily studied stand-in for humans, these new findings advance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms underlying microbial contributions to metabolism and may point to long-term strategies to treat and prevent malnutrition in general. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify common signaling mechanism that controls immune system

UT Southwestern researchers identify common signaling mechanism that controls immune system

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a common signaling mechanism to produce interferon - one of the main proteins used to signal the immune system when the body needs to defend itself against a virus, tumor, or other diseases. [More]
Doctor's Best adds three new sports nutrition powders to its science-based supplement portfolio

Doctor's Best adds three new sports nutrition powders to its science-based supplement portfolio

Doctor's Best has introduced three new sports nutrition powders – Creatine, Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAA) and L-Arginine - into its science-based supplement portfolio. [More]
Creatine monohydrate fails to slow clinical progression of Parkinson's disease

Creatine monohydrate fails to slow clinical progression of Parkinson's disease

Treatment with creatine monohydrate for at least 5 years for patients with early and treated Parkinson disease failed to slow clinical progression of the disease, compared with placebo, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Scientists identify new cellular pathway affected in cystinosis

Scientists identify new cellular pathway affected in cystinosis

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage. [More]
Scientists develop potential new therapy based on cow's immune molecules for hormone deficiencies

Scientists develop potential new therapy based on cow's immune molecules for hormone deficiencies

To help people with hormone deficiencies, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a potential new therapy based on an unlikely model: immune molecules from cows. [More]
Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen today announced a Phase 3 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of biosimilar candidate ABP 501 compared with Humira® (adalimumab) in patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis met its primary and key secondary endpoints. [More]
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