Anaphylaxis News and Research RSS Feed - Anaphylaxis News and Research

Anaphylaxis is an acute multi-system severe type I hypersensitivity reaction. Due in part to the variety of definitions, between 1% and 15% of the population of the United States can be considered "at risk" for having an anaphylactic reaction if they are exposed to one or more allergens. Of those people who actually experience anaphylaxis, up to 1% may die as a result.
Bees pose biggest public health threat in Australia, research shows

Bees pose biggest public health threat in Australia, research shows

An Australian-first national analysis of 13 years' data on bites and stings from venomous creatures reveals Australia's towns and cities are a hot-spot for encounters. [More]
Plans for schools to hold spare adrenaline auto-injector continue to progress positively

Plans for schools to hold spare adrenaline auto-injector continue to progress positively

The plans for an amendment to legislation which will allow all state schools to hold a spare adrenaline injector for use in case of emergencies continues to progress positively. We have been informed today by the Department of Health that this change is to come into effect in October of this year. [More]
New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

Recommendations for introducing peanut-containing foods to infants, compiled by an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published this week. The guidelines are intended to help prevent the development of peanut allergy. They provide specific recommendations for infants with differing risk levels for developing peanut allergy. [More]
New study shows efficacy of Ebola vaccine in offering protection against disease

New study shows efficacy of Ebola vaccine in offering protection against disease

An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly protective against the deadly virus in a major trial in Guinea, according to a new study that included researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine offers high protection against deadly virus, reveals major trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine offers high protection against deadly virus, reveals major trial

An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly protective against the deadly virus in a major trial in Guinea, according to results published today in The Lancet. The vaccine is the first to prevent infection from one of the most lethal known pathogens, and the findings add weight to early trial results published last year. [More]
Leading nonprofit patient education organization offers allergy-related restaurant safety tips

Leading nonprofit patient education organization offers allergy-related restaurant safety tips

Eating out is an American pastime - but for the millions of Americans with food or latex allergies, navigating the maze of restaurant and menu options can prove challenging, especially during the hustle and bustle of the holidays. [More]
Experts characterize racial and ethnic differences in food allergies among U.S. children

Experts characterize racial and ethnic differences in food allergies among U.S. children

Allergy and immunology experts at Rush University Medical Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have conducted the first study designed to assess and characterize the racial and ethnic difference in food allergies among children in the U.S. [More]
New technique shows promise for therapeutic reversal of food allergies

New technique shows promise for therapeutic reversal of food allergies

"This discovery reverses food allergies in mice, and we have many people with allergies volunteering their own cells for us to use in lab testing to move this research forward," said professor John Gordon, lead scientist behind the discovery just published in the current issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Researchers discover new therapeutic target for controlling fatal allergic reactions

Researchers discover new therapeutic target for controlling fatal allergic reactions

Researchers in France have identified a molecular motor that controls the release of inflammatory factors that cause severe and fatal allergic reactions. [More]
New bio-photonic device aims to take drug hypersensitivity detection into new era

New bio-photonic device aims to take drug hypersensitivity detection into new era

Over 2.5 million people in Europe and more than 5.4 million Americans suffer from hypersensitivity to Beta Lactam Antibiotics (BLCs), the most commonly prescribed drugs that contain the penicillin family, with up to 10 percent of people reporting an allergy. [More]
FAAM 2016: Experts discuss advancements in diagnosis, management of food allergies and anaphylaxis

FAAM 2016: Experts discuss advancements in diagnosis, management of food allergies and anaphylaxis

The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has announced today the inauguration of its 4th Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Meeting (FAAM), hosting over 1,200 international researchers, clinicians and allied health professionals in Rome from 13–15 October 2016. [More]
Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin was one of the first antibiotics developed and has saved millions of lives. First used in the early 1940s, penicillin is still one of the most widely used and least toxic family of antibiotics. [More]
Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Nearly 80 percent of peanut-allergic preschool children successfully incorporated peanut-containing foods into their diets after receiving peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), a clinical trial has found. [More]
FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Adlyxin (lixisenatide), a once-daily injection to improve glycemic control (blood sugar levels), along with diet and exercise, in adults with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

A team of researchers has elucidated individual profiles of allergy reactivity in patients that are not protected after treatment with immunotherapy. The aim is to improve medical treatment of people who are allergic to insect stings. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Elimination of the food that triggers atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is associated with increased risk of developing immediate reactions to that food, according to the results of a large-scale study recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Common misconception about penicillin allergies

Common misconception about penicillin allergies

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it—it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. [More]
New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

New study finds no increase in food-specific IgE levels linked to food allergies

A new study using 5,000 stored blood samples found no increase in the presence of food-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) — a blood marker associated with food allergy — in children's blood between the 1980s and the 2000s. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
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