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Angiogenesis is blood vessel formation. Tumor angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. This is caused by the release of chemicals by the tumor.
New nanoparticle approach can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue

New nanoparticle approach can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed nanoparticles that can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue. Overweight mice treated with these nanoparticles lost 10 percent of their body weight over 25 days, without showing any negative side effects. [More]
Fish oil supplements combined with anti-cancer therapy can reduce renal cell carcinoma

Fish oil supplements combined with anti-cancer therapy can reduce renal cell carcinoma

Researchers at UC Davis have shown that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid commonly found in fish and fish oil supplements, reduces renal cell carcinoma invasiveness, growth rate, and blood vessel growth when combined with the anti-cancer therapy regorafenib. The study was published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. [More]
Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a series of monographs on the evaluation of various carcinogenic risks. In a monograph on air pollution, the organization pointed out the difficulty of assessing the effects of pollution on multiple types of cancers, given their different etiologies, risk factors and variability in the composition of air pollutants in space and time. However, the IARC identified certain key components of air pollution, including particulates. [More]
Researchers report tumors can continue to grow even without supply of new blood vessels

Researchers report tumors can continue to grow even without supply of new blood vessels

When medication is used to shut off the oxygen supply to tumor cells, the cells adapt their metabolism in the medium term -- by switching over to producing energy without oxygen. This observation by biomedical scientists at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel could be used for treatments that can inhibit tumor growth in the long term, as the researchers report in the latest issue of the journal Cell Reports. [More]
International researchers make crucial discovery on formation, growth of blood vessels

International researchers make crucial discovery on formation, growth of blood vessels

As blood vessels grow, the cells that compose them must make a choice between forming side-branches or expanding the vessel surface and increasing its diameter. Now Prof. Holger Gerhardt at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in the Helmholtz Association and his international research teams have made a crucial disovery about this process: the cells can behave as a collective, moving in the same direction together. [More]
Combination of nanoscale topography and triculture technology benefits large or slow-healing wounds

Combination of nanoscale topography and triculture technology benefits large or slow-healing wounds

Large or slow-healing wounds that do not receive adequate blood flow could benefit from a novel approach that combines a nanoscale graft onto which three different cell types are layered. Proper cell alignment on the nanograft allows for the formation of new blood vessel-like structures, as reported in of Tissue Engineering, Part A, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free for download on the Tissue Engineering website until May 26, 2016. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Cholesterol-fighting drug molecule can kill prostate cancer cells

Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer, but also can kill cancerous cells. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

After an injury to tissues, such as in organ transplantation, the body grows new lymphatic vessels in a process known as lymphangiogenesis. A new study in Nature Communications reveals a mechanism involved in the regulation of this process, specifically in corneal transplants and infectious eye disease. [More]
Researchers develop new technology to tailor grafted tissues

Researchers develop new technology to tailor grafted tissues

Researchers from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and colleagues in the U.S. have developed technology to tailor grafted tissues that can respond to certain natural forces affecting blood vessels. [More]
Tews Laboratory uses LaVision BioTec UltraMicroscope to study molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion

Tews Laboratory uses LaVision BioTec UltraMicroscope to study molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion

LaVision BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on the work in the Tews Laboratory which is studying the molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion using an UltraMicroscope for enhanced imaging of cells. [More]
Cell biologists identify new way for curing cancer and vessel diseases

Cell biologists identify new way for curing cancer and vessel diseases

Cell biologists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University discovered a new way of regulating of cell motility -- this discovery will make possible development of new drugs for curing onco- and vessel diseases. [More]
Molecular basis for tongue cancer progression: an interview with Dr Simona Principe

Molecular basis for tongue cancer progression: an interview with Dr Simona Principe

Head and neck cancers (HNC) are the sixth most common cancers worldwide, with approximately 600,000 new cases diagnosed every year. [More]
Researchers provide new mechanism for age-related macular degeneration

Researchers provide new mechanism for age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment in people over 50 in developed countries. Although this condition affects up to 20% of people between the ages of 65 and 75, what drives abnormal blood vessels to invade the retina is unknown. [More]
TSRI researchers find way to predict therapeutic potential of stem cells against different diseases

TSRI researchers find way to predict therapeutic potential of stem cells against different diseases

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have for the first time developed a way to predict how a specific type of stem cell will act against different diseases. [More]
UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year — that's one in every four deaths. The impact of cardiovascular diseases is quite large. [More]
New TAU study suggests potential therapeutic pathway to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant

New TAU study suggests potential therapeutic pathway to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant

Osteosarcoma is a cancer that develops in the bones of children and adolescents. It is one of the most aggressive cancers, with only a 15 per cent, five-year survival rate when diagnosed in an advanced metastatic stage. There are approximately 800 new cases diagnosed each year in the US, and no viable treatments. [More]
Romosozumab for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis meets co-primary endpoints in Phase 3 study

Romosozumab for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis meets co-primary endpoints in Phase 3 study

Amgen and UCB today announced top-line results from the Phase 3 placebo-controlled FRActure study in postmenopausal woMen with ostEoporosis (FRAME). [More]
Using acidity to detect cancer

Using acidity to detect cancer

Normally, tissues demonstrate a slightly acidic intracellular pH (pHi) and slightly alkaline extracellular pH (pHe). However, proliferating tissues demonstrate transient pH Gradient Reversal i.e. alkalinization of pHi and acidification of pHe. [More]
New study aims to prevent chronic cardiac failure

New study aims to prevent chronic cardiac failure

Researchers at Osaka University clarified that the cell adhesion inhibition of periostin1 damages myocardinal cells, inducing compromised cardiac myocyte contractile force and myocytes death, leading to the onset of cardiac failure after AMI through the administration of periostin neutralizing antibodies they had developed on their own. [More]
Researchers use ASC secreted factors to create therapeutic factor concentrate for critical limb ischemia

Researchers use ASC secreted factors to create therapeutic factor concentrate for critical limb ischemia

"Critical limb ischemia" (CLI) describes an advanced stage of peripheral artery disease characterized by obstruction of the arteries and a markedly reduced blood flow to the extremities. CLI identifies patients at high-risk for major amputation. The estimated annual incidence of CLI ranges between 500 and 1000 new cases out of one million people per year, with the highest rates among the elderly, smokers, and those with diabetes. CLI is considered to be a critical public health issue. Attempts at revascularization are often unsuccessful. [More]
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