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Angiotensin is an oligopeptide in the blood that causes vasoconstriction, increased blood pressure, and release of aldosterone from the adrenal cortex. It is a powerful dipsogen. It is derived from the precursor molecule angiotensinogen, a serum globulin produced in the liver. It plays an important role in the renin-angiotensin system.
Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

A gene associated with sudden cardiac death in the general population has been identified using implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) monitoring in research presented for the first time at ESC Congress today. [More]
LCZ696 reduces aortic systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure in hypertensive patients

LCZ696 reduces aortic systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure in hypertensive patients

The combination drug valsartan/sacubitril known as LCZ696 significantly reduced aortic systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure compared to the standard angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan in patients with hypertension, according to results of the PARAMETER study. [More]
ATTEMPT-CVD trial results show that ARBs may have better impact on CVD biomarkers

ATTEMPT-CVD trial results show that ARBs may have better impact on CVD biomarkers

When it comes to treating high blood pressure, not all anti-hypertensive medications are equal, and results of the ATTEMPT-CVD trial suggest that telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) might have benefits over non-ARB treatment. [More]
Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

It is a paradox: Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and thus with oxygen. It has long been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process, but the exact mechanism has remained unclear. [More]
Scientists decipher new molecular signaling path that prompts protein degradation in muscle

Scientists decipher new molecular signaling path that prompts protein degradation in muscle

Patients in advanced states of myocardial insufficiency generally lose their muscle mass and muscle strength. Indeed a fact that until now has negatively impacted the clinical course of the disease and that has resulted in poor prognoses for patients. Such pathological muscle loss impacts the skeletal muscles in particular. [More]
New UNSW research shows high-fat maternal diet changes tastebuds of newborn's heart

New UNSW research shows high-fat maternal diet changes tastebuds of newborn's heart

Baby rats whose mothers were fed a high-fat diet had larger than normal hearts with fewer taste receptors for bitter flavours, according to new UNSW research. [More]
Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

The cardiovascular researcher Professor Robson Augusto Souza dos Santos of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, has been awarded the Georg Forster Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. [More]
New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

A growing number of patient studies show that people who suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and heart attack. A new review article in American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology examines the recent scientific literature to explain how the two are linked. [More]
New drug patiromer could improve potassium levels of patients with diabetic kidney disease

New drug patiromer could improve potassium levels of patients with diabetic kidney disease

Among patients with diabetic kidney disease and hyperkalemia (elevated potassium levels in the blood), a potentially life-threatening condition, those who received the new drug patiromer, twice daily for four weeks, had significant decreases in potassium levels which lasted through one year, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
FDA approves new heart failure drug

FDA approves new heart failure drug

A new drug called Entresto has been approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of heart failure. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Entresto to reduce risk of cardiovascular death, heart failure hospitalization

Novartis announces FDA approval of Entresto to reduce risk of cardiovascular death, heart failure hospitalization

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Entrestoâ„¢ tablets, previously known as LCZ696, to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure in patients with chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. [More]
Spinifex Pharmaceuticals enters into agreement to be acquired by Novartis

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals enters into agreement to be acquired by Novartis

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a company focused on the development of new drugs for the treatment of chronic pain, today announces that it has agreed to the sale of Spinifex to Novartis International AG, for an upfront cash consideration of US$200 million plus undisclosed clinical development and regulatory milestone payments. [More]
Generic heart disease drugs show promise in patients affected by Ebola virus

Generic heart disease drugs show promise in patients affected by Ebola virus

Generic medications used frequently in the management of heart disease patients also have the potential to bolster the immune systems of patients with Ebola virus and some other life-threatening illnesses, researchers report this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
New study predicts outcomes of CV patients using polypill intervention

New study predicts outcomes of CV patients using polypill intervention

A new study published in the journal BMJ Open (May 2015) has demonstrated that the improved treatment adherence achievable using a fixed-dose combination polypill (atorvastatin, ramipril and low-dose aspirin) to prevent recurring myocardial infarction, can avoid up to 15% more fatal and non-fatal CV events, conferring potential savings to healthcare systems. [More]
Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

In a study that seems to defy conventional dietary wisdom, University of Iowa scientists have found that adding high salt to a high-fat diet actually prevents weight gain in mice. [More]
Researchers discover genetic mutation responsible for thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

Researchers discover genetic mutation responsible for thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD), an enlargement or tearing of the walls of the aorta in the chest, is, together with abdominal aortic aneurysms, responsible for about 2% of all deaths in Western countries. The aorta is the largest artery in the body, and carries blood from the heart. About one out of every five patients with TAAD has a family member with the same disorder, therefore indicating a genetic cause. [More]
Withholding ARBs for longer than two days after surgery significantly increases risk of postoperative death

Withholding ARBs for longer than two days after surgery significantly increases risk of postoperative death

Withholding angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for longer than two days after surgery is associated with a significantly increased risk of postoperative death, according to a study of more than 30,000 patients in the VA health care system by researchers at UC San Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center. [More]
Regulus Therapeutics begins RG-012 Phase I clinical study for treatment of Alport syndrome

Regulus Therapeutics begins RG-012 Phase I clinical study for treatment of Alport syndrome

Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, announced today that dosing has begun in a first-in-human Phase I clinical study of RG-012, a single stranded, chemically modified oligonucleotide that binds to and inhibits the function of microRNA-21 ("miR-21"). [More]
Statins reduce risk of death by 67% in CABG surgery

Statins reduce risk of death by 67% in CABG surgery

Research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia exploring the protective effect of various heart medications that patients are taking before undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery concludes that statins reduce the risk of death by two thirds, or 67 percent, while no consistent effects were seen for other medications. [More]
Patient characteristics may guide TKI use in CML

Patient characteristics may guide TKI use in CML

The likelihood of complications associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia may be reduced by considering patient factors and differences in the toxicity profiles of the different drug options, a review suggests. [More]
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