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Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

New model explains how immune cells recognize, destroy bacteria

The innate immune system serves as the body's specialized armed forces division, comprised of a host of defense mechanisms used to battle bacterial infections. Among the system's warriors are white blood cells including the specialized macrophages, which maintain constant surveillance for foreign intruders or pathogens, functioning as the body's first line of defense, poised to attack at barrier sites including the skin, lungs and intestines. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Liposomes can help prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells

Published in Nature Biotechnology, the study at the University of Liverpool showed that specially engineered lipid (fat) bodies, called liposomes, can be used to prevent bacterial toxins from killing human cells. [More]
Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

We've known about chemicals that can be light-activated for about five to ten years now. They’ve mainly all been applied to neurons and, more specifically, the retina. Nobody has ever really looked at any tissues outside of the nervous system. [More]
Researchers develop new test to identify drugs that could work against Lyme disease

Researchers develop new test to identify drugs that could work against Lyme disease

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a test they say will allow them to test thousands of FDA-approved drugs to see if they will work against the bacteria that causes tick-borne Lyme disease. [More]
Ruthigen enrolls first patient in Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RUT58-60

Ruthigen enrolls first patient in Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RUT58-60

Ruthigen, Inc., announced today enrollment of the first patient in a Randomized, Double-Blind Phase 1/2 clinical trial to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and potential efficacy of its lead drug candidate, RUT58-60, for use as an adjunct to systemic antibiotics in abdominal surgery. [More]
Astellas' isavuconazole gets FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of invasive candidiasis

Astellas' isavuconazole gets FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of invasive candidiasis

Astellas announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation to isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. [More]
New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]

Group B streptococcus is the leading cause of infection in newborns

The findings suggest that this disturbing trend could be due the emergence of more virulent group B streptococcal strains and call for a renewed evaluation of preventive strategies to reduce neonatal disease. [More]
New findings could help develop antibiotics with lower risk of resistance

New findings could help develop antibiotics with lower risk of resistance

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics – a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. [More]
Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MRSA) continue to be among the most common pathogens that overwhelm the immune system, causing serious skin, soft tissue and life-threatening blood-borne infections. [More]
Experts to establish global anti-microbial agenda at 2014 BioInfect Conference

Experts to establish global anti-microbial agenda at 2014 BioInfect Conference

Bionow, a not for profit membership organisation for the biomedical / life-sciences industry, is delighted to be hosting the 2014 BioInfect Conference. A major one day conference looking at the critical issues relating to the development of new anti-infectives and the endemic problem of resistance, will take place at the Alderley Park Conference Centre, Cheshire on the 4th November 2014. [More]

Tannic acid may help ease impact of bacterial lung infections in CF patients

By screening over 2,000 approved drugs and natural products, scientists have shown that tannic acid may help ease the impact of bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. [More]
Pharmaceutical industry withdraws from the antibiotic space

Pharmaceutical industry withdraws from the antibiotic space

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that at least 2 million Americans are sickened by antibiotic resistant infections each year and survive. [More]
Antimicrobial stewardship to ambulatory setting should include continued feedback to clinicians

Antimicrobial stewardship to ambulatory setting should include continued feedback to clinicians

The initial benefits of an outpatient antimicrobial stewardship intervention designed to reduce the rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions were lost after discontinuation of audit and feedback to clinicians, according to a study published in JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with the IDWeek 2014 meeting. [More]
Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

The pneumococcal vaccine recommended for young children not only prevents illness and death, but also has dramatically reduced severe antibiotic-resistant infections, suggests nationwide research being presented at IDWeek 2014. [More]
Vancomycin drug still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections

Vancomycin drug still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections

A University of Nebraska Medical Center research team has determined that a longtime antibiotic, vancomycin, is still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections and that physicians should continue to use the drug even though several newer antibiotics are now available in the marketplace. [More]
Longer looks: Limits on doctor training; a woman's campaign for end-of-life choices

Longer looks: Limits on doctor training; a woman's campaign for end-of-life choices

Dr. Dino Terzic got lucky the other day. In his seventh and final year as a neurosurgery resident at the University of Minnesota, the 32-year-old Bosnian got to operate on a rare type of brain aneurysm that required a special approach through the patient's forehead. As Terzic prepared to slice into the patient's scalp, he was asked if he'd ever seen this type of flaw in an artery, which occurs in just 2 to 3 percent of aneurysm cases. "On a video," Terzic replied with a chuckle. Terzic's hands-on experience shows why the nation's medical schools are beset by a nagging controversy over rules that limit the number of hours residents can work (Dan Browning, 10/8). [More]