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Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
Revolutionary technology can prevent spread of hospital-acquired infections

Revolutionary technology can prevent spread of hospital-acquired infections

Nano Textile, introduces a revolutionary technology that can transfer any type of fabric to one that kills bacteria. [More]
Tiny molecular scaffolding could be key to fight against antibiotic resistance

Tiny molecular scaffolding could be key to fight against antibiotic resistance

Tiny molecular scaffolding that joins molecules together could be the key to our battle against antibiotic resistance. Research published in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters shows that carbon nanodot scaffolding assembled with small molecules called polyamines can kill some dangerous drug-resistant bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumanii and Klebsiella pneumonia. [More]
New experimental antibiotic can help combat MRSA infections

New experimental antibiotic can help combat MRSA infections

A new experimental antibiotic developed by a team of scientists at Rutgers University successfully treats the deadly MRSA infection and restores the efficacy of a commonly prescribed antibiotic that has become ineffective against MRSA. [More]
Pediatric diseases and treatment could have greater impact on intestinal microbial diversity

Pediatric diseases and treatment could have greater impact on intestinal microbial diversity

Tracy C. Grikscheit, MD, pediatric surgeon and principal investigator at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, treats a large number of young patients who require surgery for various intestinal diseases. [More]
Few simple tips to prevent, treat swimmer’s ear

Few simple tips to prevent, treat swimmer’s ear

For many kids, spending hours in the water this summer can bring on a painful infection of the external ear canal called swimmer's ear. [More]
Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Corneal blindness is estimated to be the second most prevalent cause of blindness in many less developed countries. Globally, bilateral corneal blindness is estimated to afflict 4.9 million persons and accounts for 12% of 39 million blind, utilizing WHO 2010 global blindness data. [More]
New method helps speed up bacterial identification

New method helps speed up bacterial identification

Pinpointing the type of bacteria that are at the root of an infection in clinical samples removed from living tissues, such as blood, urine or joint fluids, to quickly identify the best anti-microbial therapy still poses a formidable challenge. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]

Research reveals complicated love story between bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance

It's thought that antibiotic resistance is associated with a fitness cost, meaning that bacteria that develop antibiotic resistance must sacrifice something in order to do so. Because of this, proper use of antibiotics should result in susceptible strains eventually replacing resistant ones. [More]
New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

Doctors have a powerful arsenal of cancer-fighting chemotherapy drugs to choose from, though a key challenge is to better target these drugs to kill tumors while limiting their potentially harmful side effects. [More]
Screening for syphilis in persons at risk for infection provides substantial benefit

Screening for syphilis in persons at risk for infection provides substantial benefit

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has found convincing evidence that screening for syphilis infection in asymptomatic, nonpregnant persons at increased risk for infection provides substantial benefit. The report appears in the June 7 issue of JAMA. [More]
New immunization approach may one day wipe out pneumonia, meningitis

New immunization approach may one day wipe out pneumonia, meningitis

A new vaccine allows pneumonia-causing bacteria to colonize inside the body, springing into action only if the bacteria pose a threat. [More]
Innovative RapifleX MALDI-TOF/TOF showcased by Bruker

Innovative RapifleX MALDI-TOF/TOF showcased by Bruker

At the 64th ASMS Conference, Bruker introducesrapifleX™, the highest performance MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer, which had been shown as work-in-progress to early adopters at HUPO 2015. [More]
New systems-based strategy may help accelerate TB drug discovery

New systems-based strategy may help accelerate TB drug discovery

The rise in multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is becoming a major cause of global health concern for treating tuberculosis, which affects a third of the global population. [More]
Researchers examine pan-genome of deadly Staph bacteria

Researchers examine pan-genome of deadly Staph bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are the leading cause of skin, soft tissue and several other types of infections. Staph is also a global public threat due to the rapid rise of antibiotic-resistant strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA. [More]
Bacteriophage combinations show therapeutic potential in reducing C. difficile infections

Bacteriophage combinations show therapeutic potential in reducing C. difficile infections

A new University of Leicester study has confirmed the therapeutic potential of bacteriophage combinations to treat highly infectious bacteria C. difficile infections (CDI) while retaining a healthy gut. [More]
Cigarette smoke promotes bacteria colonization, immune invasion

Cigarette smoke promotes bacteria colonization, immune invasion

The mouth is one of the "dirtiest" parts of the body, home to millions of germs. But puffing cigarettes can increase the likelihood that certain bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis will not only set up camp but will build a fortified city in the mouth and fight against the immune system. [More]
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
OIST scientists reveal how big protein complex inside E. coli cells divide and multiply

OIST scientists reveal how big protein complex inside E. coli cells divide and multiply

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are bacteria that live all around and inside of us. Most E. coli are harmless, but some strains can cause illness, and can even, in extreme cases, be deadly. With recent outbreaks of E. coli around the world, there is a fear of acquiring an infection from these bacteria. [More]
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