Antibiotic News and Research RSS Feed - Antibiotic News and Research

Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
Manipulation of gut microbes can reverse negative effects of high fat diet, researchers find

Manipulation of gut microbes can reverse negative effects of high fat diet, researchers find

Did you know that your gut sends neural messages to the brain to tell it when it is full? Researchers at the University of Georgia, Binghamton University, and Pennsylvania State University have now found that chronic consumption of high fat foods disturbs these neural messages in rats by shifting the populations of bacteria that ordinarily reside inside the gut. [More]
Researchers develop new technique to help GPs better diagnose UTI in children

Researchers develop new technique to help GPs better diagnose UTI in children

Urinary tract infections (UTI) in young children can lead to kidney damage, but are notoriously difficult to diagnose in primary care because symptoms can often be vague and unclear. [More]
Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

Researchers receive $9 million grant to develop novel platform to quickly identify new antibiotics

In September 2014, President Obama issued an executive order for "Combating Antibiotic- Resistant Bacteria." Why the urgency? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the order noted, "estimates that annually at least 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths are caused by antibiotic- resistant bacteria in the United States alone." [More]
ANTRUK awards first research contract to Evotec to find ways of breaking antibiotic resistance

ANTRUK awards first research contract to Evotec to find ways of breaking antibiotic resistance

Thanks to the generosity of its donors, Antibiotic Research UK – the world’s first charity established to fight antibiotic resistance, provide patient support and raise awareness of the issue of antibiotic resistance – has awarded its first research contract to Evotec, a leading organisation in drug discovery and development. [More]
Microbes detected in Boston subway system have low pathogenic potential, study shows

Microbes detected in Boston subway system have low pathogenic potential, study shows

Boston's subway system, known as the T, might be just as bacteria-laden as you'd expect but organisms found there are largely from normal human skin and incapable of causing disease, according to a study published June 28 in mSystems, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Curza receives SBIR grant to develop new class of broad spectrum antibiotics

Curza receives SBIR grant to develop new class of broad spectrum antibiotics

Curza Global, LLC, a company based on technology developed at the University of Utah, has been awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research grant of $598,770 entitled "Natural product-inspired antibacterials with unique ribosomal binding" that will provide two years of support. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children

NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children

NPS MedicineWise has written to child care centres across Australia to enlist their support in responding to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Child care staff are well placed to help with education and increase awareness around the misuse of antibiotics in young children. [More]
New research highlights need to abandon modern hygiene hypothesis

New research highlights need to abandon modern hygiene hypothesis

The July issue of Perspectives in Public Health (published by the Royal Society of Public Health) takes an objective view of ongoing research showing that the hygiene hypothesis – the idea that allergies are the price we are paying for our “modern obsession with cleanliness” – is a misleading misnomer. [More]
Tiny viruses speed-up evolution of bacteria causing infections in cystic fibrosis patients

Tiny viruses speed-up evolution of bacteria causing infections in cystic fibrosis patients

SCIENTISTS in the UK have found new evidence that tiny viruses called bacteriophages turbo-charge the evolution of bacteria that cause lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. [More]
Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Tuberculosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world, infecting almost 10 million people each year. Treating the disease can be challenging and requires a combination of multiple antibiotics delivered over several months. [More]
Studies shed more light on relation between bacteria, immune system and antibiotics

Studies shed more light on relation between bacteria, immune system and antibiotics

Antibiotics and the immune system are the two forces that cope with bacterial infections. Now, two studies from Isabel Gordo's laboratory, at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, show for the first time that resistance to antibiotics and to the immune system is interconnected in bacteria. [More]
Safety tips to prevent injuries from fireworks during summer

Safety tips to prevent injuries from fireworks during summer

Fireworks can result in severe burns, scars and disfigurement that can last a lifetime. [More]
Researchers develop computer model for speed analysis of TB's complex life-cycle

Researchers develop computer model for speed analysis of TB's complex life-cycle

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a serious global health problem accounting for 1.3 million worldwide deaths annually. [More]
Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Biofilms are communities of bacteria that adhere to a surface and are nearly impossible to eradicate when they are pathogenic, or disease-causing. [More]
New research identifies flaws in LM-method for Lyme disease

New research identifies flaws in LM-method for Lyme disease

A new microscopy technique (LM-method) developed to detect Lyme disease is unable to distinguish infected patients from healthy controls, yielding false-positive results that could lead doctors to over-diagnose a patient, according to new research published in the journal Infectious Diseases. [More]
Allergy-causing immune cells play life-saving role in deadly C. difficile infection

Allergy-causing immune cells play life-saving role in deadly C. difficile infection

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified immune cells vital for protecting us from potentially fatal C. difficile infection. Surprisingly, those cells are often vilified for their role in causing asthma and allergies. But when it comes to C. difficile, they could be the difference in life and death. [More]
ESCMID-ASM conference aims to speed up drug development processes for drug-resistant infections

ESCMID-ASM conference aims to speed up drug development processes for drug-resistant infections

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) are jointly organizing a conference in Vienna from 21 – 23 September 2016 to help researchers accelerate the development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant infections. [More]
Scientists streamline total synthesis of uncialamycin drug

Scientists streamline total synthesis of uncialamycin drug

A team led by Rice University scientists has improved the production of a potent anti-tumor antibiotic known as uncialamycin. [More]
Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

Microbial community less stable and less diverse in antibiotic-treated children

The DIABIMMUNE project followed the development of 39 Finnish infants from birth to the age of three. Half of the children received 9-15 antibiotic treatments during the research period, and the other half did not receive any such treatments. [More]
Salvage inotuzumab ozogamicin improves ALL outcomes

Salvage inotuzumab ozogamicin improves ALL outcomes

Compared with standard chemotherapy, treatment with inotuzumab ozogamicin increases the rate of complete remission and allows a higher proportion of patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia to subsequently receive stem-cell transplantation, research suggests. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement