Antibiotic News and Research RSS Feed - Antibiotic News and Research

Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
Universal MRSA screening may be too costly for individual hospital to adopt

Universal MRSA screening may be too costly for individual hospital to adopt

Numerous experts and policy makers have called for hospitals to screen patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and isolate anyone testing positive to prevent the spread of these so-called "Superbugs" in healthcare settings. [More]
LLNL scientists issued patent for producing antimicrobial compounds to fight superbugs

LLNL scientists issued patent for producing antimicrobial compounds to fight superbugs

Superbugs, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, have been on the rise since antibiotics were first introduced 80 years ago. That's because these germ-fighting agents have lost their punch from being overprescribed and misused, allowing bacteria pathogens to develop immunities against them. [More]
New report shows liquid detergent pods can cause eye injuries to children

New report shows liquid detergent pods can cause eye injuries to children

Liquid laundry and dishwasher detergent pods are an emerging source of chemical exposure in children. When squeezed or bitten into, these pods can burst and send detergent into the mouth, nose, and eyes. [More]
TRU-D SmartUVC’s Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot to be showcased at IDWeek 2014

TRU-D SmartUVC’s Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot to be showcased at IDWeek 2014

TRU-D SmartUVC LLC will feature its Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot at IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia this week from October 8 to 12 at booth 826. [More]
New implantable device can control heart failure

New implantable device can control heart failure

A new, implantable device to control heart failure is showing promising results in the first trial to determine safety and effectiveness in patients, according to lead researcher Dr. William Abraham of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. [More]
Researchers reveal 'programmable' antibiotic technique to target drug-resistant microbes

Researchers reveal 'programmable' antibiotic technique to target drug-resistant microbes

The multitude of microbes scientists have found populating the human body have good, bad and mostly mysterious implications for our health. But when something goes wrong, we defend ourselves with the undiscriminating brute force of traditional antibiotics, which wipe out everything at once, regardless of the consequences. [More]
Virginia Tech professor wins Paul L. Busch Award for outstanding work in water quality research

Virginia Tech professor wins Paul L. Busch Award for outstanding work in water quality research

Amy Pruden, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, is the 2014 recipient of the Paul L. Busch Award, including a $100,000 research grant. [More]
Viewpoints: Shop around for health coverage; 'gaming' Obamacare; FDA and painkillers

Viewpoints: Shop around for health coverage; 'gaming' Obamacare; FDA and painkillers

My colleagues Margot Sanger-Katz and Amanda Cox wrote recently that shopping around for the best price can be crucial for people renewing their coverage on the health insurance exchanges this fall. [More]
Research shows resveratrol in grapes inhibits bacteria that cause acne

Research shows resveratrol in grapes inhibits bacteria that cause acne

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. [More]
Gut microbe in patients may tip doctors about SCID

Gut microbe in patients may tip doctors about SCID

Many people recognize "the bubble boy" as an unusual character from a "Seinfeld" episode or a John Travolta movie. [More]
New approach to solve global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss

New approach to solve global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss

Solving global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss requires evolutionary thinking, argues a new study published online in Science Express that was co-authored by Bruce Tabashnik of the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. [More]
Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Repeated exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in the first two years of life is associated with early childhood obesity, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a retrospective study based on data from electronic health records from the extensive CHOP Care Network. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Leading Cystic Fibrosis experts call for greater research on antibacterial resistance

Leading Cystic Fibrosis experts call for greater research on antibacterial resistance

World leading Cystic Fibrosis experts, from Queen's University Belfast, have called for greater research to address the major concern of antibacterial resistance. [More]
New report shows lifestyle changes, new technology make people stay healthy in old age

New report shows lifestyle changes, new technology make people stay healthy in old age

If we embrace lifestyle changes and new technology, we improve our prospects of staying healthy in old age, getting good care and reducing our dependence on others. This is the message of a new report summarising the conclusions from the Uppsala Health Summit in June. [More]
DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

DNA sequencing may lead to greater care for patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

A patient survives life-threatening trauma, is intubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) to support his or her affected vital functions, starts to recover, and then develops pneumonia. [More]
Viewpoints: CHIP funding needed; GOP's flawed plan to make 'the pill' OTC; millennials' health issues

Viewpoints: CHIP funding needed; GOP's flawed plan to make 'the pill' OTC; millennials' health issues

Federal financing for a beneficial health insurance program for low-income children, known as the Children's Health Insurance Program or CHIP, will run out next year unless Congress agrees to extend it. Bills are pending in both the House and the Senate to extend financing for four years, to 2019. Congress should approve the extension in the lame-duck session after the midterm elections so that families and state officials will know what the future holds. The program needs to be maintained amid uncertainty as to whether other good coverage will be available for these children (9/21). [More]
Anticonvulsant drug may help develop new class of antibiotics

Anticonvulsant drug may help develop new class of antibiotics

McMaster scientists have found that an anticonvulsant drug may help in developing a new class of antibiotics. [More]
Elusys completes phase 3 clinical program of obiltoxaximab in healthy adult volunteers

Elusys completes phase 3 clinical program of obiltoxaximab in healthy adult volunteers

Elusys Therapeutics, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing antibody therapies to treat infectious disease, today announced it has completed three phase 3 healthy adult volunteer safety studies of obiltoxaximab (ETI-204). [More]
MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect more than 2 million people nationwide, and kill at least 23,000. Despite the urgent need for new treatments, scientists have discovered very few new classes of antibiotics in the past decade. [More]