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Antibiotics are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms.
Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. [More]
ECCMID 2016: Global experts join to fight antimicrobial resistance

ECCMID 2016: Global experts join to fight antimicrobial resistance

Medical professionals, business and government officials from around the world joined in Amsterdam on the sidelines of the ECCMID 2016 Conference, hosted by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases to declare their commitment to fight antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a concerted effort. [More]
New research demonstrates effectiveness of six-step hand-hygiene technique for reducing bacteria

New research demonstrates effectiveness of six-step hand-hygiene technique for reducing bacteria

New research demonstrates that the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is superior to a three-step method suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in reducing bacteria on healthcare workers' hands. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Keynotes announced for ECCMID 2016

Keynotes announced for ECCMID 2016

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) previews some of the keynote lectures at the 26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). The globe’s most prominent infection specialists will be gathering at its annual congress in Amsterdam from 9 – 12 April 2016. [More]
New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

In humans, cholera is among the world's most deadly diseases, killing as many as 140,000 persons a year, according to World Health Organization statistics. But in aquatic environments far away from humans, the same bacterium attacks neighboring microbes with a toxic spear - and often steals DNA from other microorganisms to expand its own capabilities. [More]
Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Researchers at UiO and NCMM have discovered that the system used by bacteria to transport magnesium is so sensitive that it can detect a pinch of magnesium salt in a swimming pool. [More]
Artificial mimic of protein could lead to new ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells

Artificial mimic of protein could lead to new ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells

An artificial mimic of a key light-sensitive molecule has been made by scientists at the University of Bristol. The work, published in Science, could lead to new ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells. [More]
SymCel joins global initiative to combat antibiotic resistance

SymCel joins global initiative to combat antibiotic resistance

Following the global and joint initiative by the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostics industries this year to combat antibiotic resistance, demand for innovative solutions is especially high. The event took place in January at the World Economic Forum in Davos. [More]
NTU researchers make breakthrough to tackle growing concern of antibiotic resistance

NTU researchers make breakthrough to tackle growing concern of antibiotic resistance

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have discovered that antibiotics can continue to be effective if bacteria's cell-to-cell communication and ability to latch on to each other are disrupted. [More]
Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

A research team led by University of Arkansas chemist Jingyi Chen and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences microbiologist Mark Smeltzer has developed an alternative therapeutic approach to fighting antibiotic-resistant infections. [More]
Abstracts on colistin resistance and migrant health part of 300 late-breaker sessions for ECCMID 2016

Abstracts on colistin resistance and migrant health part of 300 late-breaker sessions for ECCMID 2016

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID) – an organization that explores risks, knowledge sharing and best practices in the fight against infectious disease – has received more than 300 late-breaker abstract submissions for its annual congress, ECCMID 2016 in Amsterdam. [More]
Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Communities of viruses can be transferred during fecal transplants, according to a study published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Fortunately for patients who use this procedure, the viruses found to be transmitted in this study appear to be harmless to humans. [More]
New device can deliver diagnosis to patient in 30 minutes

New device can deliver diagnosis to patient in 30 minutes

When a person contracts a disease, it takes time to diagnose the symptoms. Cell culturing, immunoassay and a nucleic-acid based diagnostic cycle all take several days, if not a week to determine the results. Not only do sick patients suffer during this time period, the wait can also lead to unnecessary disease spreading and perhaps avoidable antibiotic use. [More]
Failure to complete antibiotics could lead to additional treatment for existing skin infection

Failure to complete antibiotics could lead to additional treatment for existing skin infection

In the first study of its kind, researchers found patients with S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections took, on average, just 57% of their prescribed antibiotic doses after leaving the hospital, resulting in nearly half of them getting a new infection or needing additional treatment for the existing skin infection. [More]
New approach allows noninvasive identification of tumor mutations in lung cancer patients

New approach allows noninvasive identification of tumor mutations in lung cancer patients

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a way to significantly increase the sensitivity of a technique to identify and sequence DNA from cancer cells circulating in a person's blood. [More]
Study provides better picture of molecular basis for antibiotic resistance

Study provides better picture of molecular basis for antibiotic resistance

Scientists from the University of Leeds have solved a 25-year-old question about how a family of proteins allow bacteria to resist the effects of certain antibiotics. [More]
New research links antibiotic use before age 2 to childhood obesity

New research links antibiotic use before age 2 to childhood obesity

While early antibiotic use has been associated with a number of rare long-term health consequences, new research links antibiotics to one of the most important and growing public health problems worldwide -- obesity. [More]
Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

The largest genetic study on the bacterium responsible for epidemic dysentery has revealed that the Shigella dysenteriae pathogen, which remains a real scourge in Africa and Asia, probably originated in Europe. [More]
Scientists look for new antibiotic drugs in unexpected places

Scientists look for new antibiotic drugs in unexpected places

Many of the drugs we use in hospitals – antibiotics, antifungals and anti-cancer drugs, to name but a few – are produced by bacteria that live in the soil beneath our feet. [More]

University of Copenhagen researchers discover Achilles heel of bacteria

Drug resistant bacteria are fast becoming one of the big worries of the 21 century. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have discovered a previously unknown weakness; an "Achilles heel", of bacteria. Their discovery, a crucial step in bacteria's energy metabolism, may be the first step in developing an entirely novel form of antibiotics [More]
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