Antihistamine News and Research RSS Feed - Antihistamine News and Research

Antihistamine is a type of drug that blocks the action of histamines, which can cause fever, itching, sneezing, a runny nose, and watery eyes. Antihistamines are used to prevent fevers in patients receiving blood transfusions and to treat allergies, coughs, and colds.
FDA accepts, files Genentech's sBLA for subcutaneous use of Xolair in people with CIU

FDA accepts, files Genentech's sBLA for subcutaneous use of Xolair in people with CIU

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted and filed the company's supplemental Biologics License Application for subcutaneous use of Xolair (omalizumab) in people with Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria who remained symptomatic despite treatment with H1-antihistamine therapy at approved doses. [More]
New class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating deadly form of lung cancer

New class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating deadly form of lung cancer

A little-used class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating a particularly deadly form of lung cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Improved lung function in patients with moderate asthma severity observed with investigational Tiotropium

Improved lung function in patients with moderate asthma severity observed with investigational Tiotropium

Boehringer Ingelheim will present a pooled analysis of new data from the Phase 3 UniTinA-asthma® program at the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress 2013 in Barcelona. The data from the individual MezzoTinA-asthma® Phase 3 studies (NCT01340209 and NCT00565266), from which the pooled data are derived, show the addition of tiotropium delivered via the Respimat® inhaler to medium-dose maintenance inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy (defined as 400-800 µg budesonide/day or equivalent) improved lung function and provided sustained bronchodilation over 24 hours in patients with moderate asthma and airflow limitation. Tiotropium is being investigated to determine the medicine’s efficacy in treating asthma patients and is not currently approved for this indication. [More]
Symptoms, first-aid treatments and prevention tips for insect bites

Symptoms, first-aid treatments and prevention tips for insect bites

Whether they are invading your picnic, hitching a ride on your skin or just buzzing around your head, bugs are an annoying and unavoidable part of summer. Still, there are times when bugs are just a nuisance and times when they can cause serious illness or injury. [More]
Diclegis delayed-release tablets for NVP treatment now eligible for Medicaid coverage

Diclegis delayed-release tablets for NVP treatment now eligible for Medicaid coverage

Duchesnay USA today announced that Diclegis (doxylamine succinate 10mg, pyridoxine hydrochloride 10mg) delayed-release tablets for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, more commonly known as morning sickness, is now available for coverage under the state and federal Medicaid program effective July 1st, 2013. [More]
Findings link antihistamine use to adverse pregnancy outcomes

Findings link antihistamine use to adverse pregnancy outcomes

Women with a severe form of morning sickness who take antihistamines to help them sleep through their debilitating nausea are significantly more likely to experience adverse pregnancy outcomes, including low birth weight babies and premature births, a UCLA study has found. [More]
Allergic rhinitis treatments: an interview with Dr Dermot Ryan, GP and allergy expert

Allergic rhinitis treatments: an interview with Dr Dermot Ryan, GP and allergy expert

Allergic rhinitis is most commonly recognized as hay fever in the United Kingdom and it is due to the impact of an allergen, in the case of hay fever a pollen, setting off an inflammatory response in the lungs, causing typical symptoms... [More]
Review on new, hazardous drugs of abuse presented in Journal of Addiction Medicine

Review on new, hazardous drugs of abuse presented in Journal of Addiction Medicine

The last few years have seen the emergence of a new drug problem in so-called "bath salts"-actually "designer stimulants," packaged and sold in ways that skirt drug laws. A review and update on these designer drugs is presented in the June Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Ragweed allergy sublingual immunotherapy: an interview with Dr. Peter Creticos, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Ragweed allergy sublingual immunotherapy: an interview with Dr. Peter Creticos, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Ragweed is a dominant seasonal allergen in North America (~26% of US and North American population is allergic to this noxious weed which pollinates from early August to early October). [More]
Antihistamine drugs work by preventing histamine from attaching to H1 receptors

Antihistamine drugs work by preventing histamine from attaching to H1 receptors

Itchy eyes, scratchy throat, running nose--it's allergy season! What triggers these allergic reactions, and how do allergy medications work? [More]
BD receives FDA approval for second prefilled injectable drug

BD receives FDA approval for second prefilled injectable drug

BD Rx Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of leading global medical technology company BD, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the second drug to be offered in the recently launched BD Simplist line of ready-to-administer prefilled generic injectables. [More]
TSRI scientists identify new drugs for human prion disease

TSRI scientists identify new drugs for human prion disease

Human diseases caused by misfolded proteins known as prions are some of most rare yet terrifying on the planet—incurable with disturbing symptoms that include dementia, personality shifts, hallucinations and coordination problems. [More]
Tris Pharma gets FDA NDA approval for Karbinal ER Extended-release Oral Suspension

Tris Pharma gets FDA NDA approval for Karbinal ER Extended-release Oral Suspension

Tris Pharma, a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on developing innovative drug delivery technologies, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its New Drug Application for Karbinal ER (carbinoxamine maleate) Extended-release Oral Suspension 4mg/5ml, the first sustained-release histamine receptor blocking agent indicated for the treatment of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis in children ages 2 and up. [More]
Report highlights ecological cost of pharmaceutical waste

Report highlights ecological cost of pharmaceutical waste

Pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams, with unknown impacts on aquatic life and water quality. [More]

Patients taking antihistamines to suppress stomach acid are at greater risk of C. diff infection

Patients receiving antihistamines to suppress stomach acid are at greater risk of infection from Clostridium difficile, or C. diff, a common cause of diarrhea, particularly in health care settings, Mayo Clinic researchers have found. [More]
Study shows why certain drugs that interact with serotonin receptors have harmful effects

Study shows why certain drugs that interact with serotonin receptors have harmful effects

A team including scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has determined and analyzed the high-resolution atomic structures of two kinds of human serotonin receptor. [More]
Omalizumab scratches the itch for urticaria patients

Omalizumab scratches the itch for urticaria patients

The monoclonal antibody omalizumab seems to be effective at relieving symptoms for patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria who have not responded to H1-antihistamine therapy, report US researchers. [More]
Omalizumab fast, safe and well-tolerated in teens and adults with chronic spontaneous urticaria

Omalizumab fast, safe and well-tolerated in teens and adults with chronic spontaneous urticaria

An international team of researchers has found that a once-a-month, high-dose injection of a commonly used asthma drug is highly effective in treating teens and adults chronically afflicted with hives and severe, itchy rash. The drug, omalizumab, was tested on 323 people at 55 medical centers for whom standard antihistamine therapy failed to quell their underlying, allergy-like reaction, known as chronic idiopathic urticaria or chronic spontaneous urticaria. [More]
Itch-specific nerve cells: an interview with Associate Professor Xinzhong Dong

Itch-specific nerve cells: an interview with Associate Professor Xinzhong Dong

Itch was actually defined by a German physician more than 350 years ago. His name was Samuel Hafenreffer. He defined itch as an unpleasant sensation that makes people want to scratch. You probably think this is a very simple definition but itch is really a very complex sensory modality. [More]
Placing peanut protein under a patient's tongue helps dampen allergic reactions

Placing peanut protein under a patient's tongue helps dampen allergic reactions

Of all foods, peanuts are the most frequent cause of life-threatening and fatal allergic reactions. New research at National Jewish Health provides additional support for a strategy to reduce the severity of reactions to peanut- repeatedly consuming small amounts of the very food that causes those reactions in the first place, a practice called immunotherapy. [More]
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