Antihistamine News and Research RSS Feed - Antihistamine News and Research

Antihistamine is a type of drug that blocks the action of histamines, which can cause fever, itching, sneezing, a runny nose, and watery eyes. Antihistamines are used to prevent fevers in patients receiving blood transfusions and to treat allergies, coughs, and colds.
BD receives FDA approval for second prefilled injectable drug

BD receives FDA approval for second prefilled injectable drug

BD Rx Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of leading global medical technology company BD, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the second drug to be offered in the recently launched BD Simplist line of ready-to-administer prefilled generic injectables. [More]
TSRI scientists identify new drugs for human prion disease

TSRI scientists identify new drugs for human prion disease

Human diseases caused by misfolded proteins known as prions are some of most rare yet terrifying on the planet—incurable with disturbing symptoms that include dementia, personality shifts, hallucinations and coordination problems. [More]
Tris Pharma gets FDA NDA approval for Karbinal ER Extended-release Oral Suspension

Tris Pharma gets FDA NDA approval for Karbinal ER Extended-release Oral Suspension

Tris Pharma, a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on developing innovative drug delivery technologies, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its New Drug Application for Karbinal ER (carbinoxamine maleate) Extended-release Oral Suspension 4mg/5ml, the first sustained-release histamine receptor blocking agent indicated for the treatment of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis in children ages 2 and up. [More]
Report highlights ecological cost of pharmaceutical waste

Report highlights ecological cost of pharmaceutical waste

Pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams, with unknown impacts on aquatic life and water quality. [More]

Patients taking antihistamines to suppress stomach acid are at greater risk of C. diff infection

Patients receiving antihistamines to suppress stomach acid are at greater risk of infection from Clostridium difficile, or C. diff, a common cause of diarrhea, particularly in health care settings, Mayo Clinic researchers have found. [More]
Study shows why certain drugs that interact with serotonin receptors have harmful effects

Study shows why certain drugs that interact with serotonin receptors have harmful effects

A team including scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has determined and analyzed the high-resolution atomic structures of two kinds of human serotonin receptor. [More]
Omalizumab scratches the itch for urticaria patients

Omalizumab scratches the itch for urticaria patients

The monoclonal antibody omalizumab seems to be effective at relieving symptoms for patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria who have not responded to H1-antihistamine therapy, report US researchers. [More]
Omalizumab fast, safe and well-tolerated in teens and adults with chronic spontaneous urticaria

Omalizumab fast, safe and well-tolerated in teens and adults with chronic spontaneous urticaria

An international team of researchers has found that a once-a-month, high-dose injection of a commonly used asthma drug is highly effective in treating teens and adults chronically afflicted with hives and severe, itchy rash. The drug, omalizumab, was tested on 323 people at 55 medical centers for whom standard antihistamine therapy failed to quell their underlying, allergy-like reaction, known as chronic idiopathic urticaria or chronic spontaneous urticaria. [More]
Itch-specific nerve cells: an interview with Associate Professor Xinzhong Dong

Itch-specific nerve cells: an interview with Associate Professor Xinzhong Dong

Itch was actually defined by a German physician more than 350 years ago. His name was Samuel Hafenreffer. He defined itch as an unpleasant sensation that makes people want to scratch. You probably think this is a very simple definition but itch is really a very complex sensory modality. [More]
Placing peanut protein under a patient's tongue helps dampen allergic reactions

Placing peanut protein under a patient's tongue helps dampen allergic reactions

Of all foods, peanuts are the most frequent cause of life-threatening and fatal allergic reactions. New research at National Jewish Health provides additional support for a strategy to reduce the severity of reactions to peanut- repeatedly consuming small amounts of the very food that causes those reactions in the first place, a practice called immunotherapy. [More]
FDA approves GSK’s raxibacumab to treat inhalational anthrax

FDA approves GSK’s raxibacumab to treat inhalational anthrax

GlaxoSmithKline plc announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved raxibacumab for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with inhalational anthrax due to Bacillus anthracis in combination with appropriate antibacterial drugs and for prophylaxis of inhalational anthrax when alternative therapies are not available or are not appropriate. [More]
Allergies common in ADHD, tic disorder patients

Allergies common in ADHD, tic disorder patients

A significant number of people with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and tic disorder also have one or more allergic diseases such as asthma or atopic dermatitis, show study results. [More]
Inappropriate prescriptions for the elderly prevalent in primary care

Inappropriate prescriptions for the elderly prevalent in primary care

One in five prescriptions in primary care for the elderly is inappropriate, say the authors of a systematic review. [More]
Latrepiridine reduces level of at least two neurodegeneration-related proteins in mice

Latrepiridine reduces level of at least two neurodegeneration-related proteins in mice

The second of two studies on latrepirdine, recently published in Molecular Psychiatry, demonstrates new potential for the compound in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, sleep disorders, and other neurodegenerative conditions. [More]
Latrepirdine demonstrates new potential against neurodegenerative conditions

Latrepirdine demonstrates new potential against neurodegenerative conditions

The second of two studies on latrepirdine, recently published in Molecular Psychiatry, demonstrates new potential for the compound in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, sleep disorders, and other neurodegenerative conditions. An international team led by Mount Sinai School of Medicine scientists found that latrepiridine, known commercially as Dimebon, reduced the level of at least two neurodegeneration-related proteins in mice. [More]
Combination therapy does not change safety and efficacy relationship of TORISEL for advanced RCC

Combination therapy does not change safety and efficacy relationship of TORISEL for advanced RCC

Pfizer Inc. announced that the Phase 3 INTORACT trial (B1771006), evaluating the combination of bevacizumab plus TORISEL (temsirolimus) compared with bevacizumab plus interferon-alfa-2a (IFN-α-2a) in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) across risk groups, did not meet its primary endpoint of superiority in extending progression free survival (PFS) in the study population. [More]
Latrepirdine appears effective in treating Alzheimer's disease in animals

Latrepirdine appears effective in treating Alzheimer's disease in animals

An international team of scientists led by researchers at Mount Sinai School Medicine have discovered that a drug that had previously yielded conflicting results in clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease effectively stopped the progression of memory deterioration and brain pathology in mouse models of early stage Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Pfizer fails to meet primary endpoint in TORISEL Phase 3 study for advanced RCC

Pfizer fails to meet primary endpoint in TORISEL Phase 3 study for advanced RCC

Pfizer Inc announced that the Phase 3 INTORSECT (B1771003) study, evaluating TORISEL(temsirolimus) in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) whose disease had progressed on or after SUTENT (sunitinib malate) therapy, did not meet the primary endpoint of prolonging progression free survival (PFS) when compared to sorafenib. [More]

Over-the-counter insect bite remedies not very effective

Research suggests that most victims of home-bred midges, mosquitoes, flies, bedbugs and fleas will get better without any treatment at all. The review in the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB), which offers impartial advice to doctors, admits that getting bitten may be horribly uncomfortable but there is little evidence that over-the-counter remedies work. Putting a cold compress to relieve pain and swelling could be a better option say researchers. Medical help should clearly be sought if serious symptoms, such as infections or anaphylactic shock, developed the DTB added. [More]
Poultry producers still use FDA-banned antibiotics

Poultry producers still use FDA-banned antibiotics

In a joint study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Arizona State University found evidence suggesting that a class of antibiotics previously banned by the U.S. government for poultry production is still in use. Results of the study were published March 21 in Environmental Science & Technology. [More]