Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
Mitochondrial dysfunction linked to chemotherapeutic resistance in African-American men with prostate cancer

Mitochondrial dysfunction linked to chemotherapeutic resistance in African-American men with prostate cancer

Improper functioning of the mitochondria, a cell's source of energy, may help account for the fact that African-American men with prostate cancer respond poorly to the same conventional therapies provided to Caucasian-American men, according to research led by Dhyan Chandra, PhD, Associate Professor of Oncology in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. [More]
Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a novel function of the gene PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1) that helps prostate cancer cells metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body. This mechanism highlights new potential targets for cancer therapies and challenges the previous understanding of PLK1's role in cancer growth and progression. [More]
Researchers find mechanism behind pancreatic cancer cells' resistance to certain drugs

Researchers find mechanism behind pancreatic cancer cells' resistance to certain drugs

Pancreatic cancer is on track to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths by 2020. These statistics are due, in part, to pancreatic cancer's resistance to most targeted cancer therapies. Working with pancreatic cancer cells, researchers have now found a mechanism that could be responsible for the cancer's resistance to at least one targeted approach. [More]
Survivin inhibitor with chemotherapy provides therapeutic advantage for Rb cells, tumors

Survivin inhibitor with chemotherapy provides therapeutic advantage for Rb cells, tumors

Researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have demonstrated that targeting survivin - a protein that inhibits apoptosis or cell death - enhances the effectiveness of chemotherapy in cells and mouse models of retinoblastoma (Rb), the most common malignant tumor of the eye in children. [More]
Genetic modification of common virus gives extra weapon to kill cancer cells

Genetic modification of common virus gives extra weapon to kill cancer cells

A common flu virus could be used to overcome patients' resistance to certain cancer drugs -- and improve how those drugs kill cancer cells, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Six newly identified proteins may help potentially unlock new insights into aging-related diseases

Six newly identified proteins may help potentially unlock new insights into aging-related diseases

A group of six newly discovered proteins may help to divulge secrets of how we age, potentially unlocking new insights into diabetes, Alzheimer's, cancer, and other aging-related diseases. [More]
Distribution of c-Myc protein during asymmetric cell division influences fate, roles of activated T cells

Distribution of c-Myc protein during asymmetric cell division influences fate, roles of activated T cells

The fates of immune cells can be decided at the initial division of a cell. Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered that the production of daughter cells with different roles in the immune system is driven by the lopsided distribution of the signaling protein c-Myc. Nudging c-Myc in one direction or the other could make vaccines more effective or advance immunotherapies for cancer treatment. The research appears online today in the scientific journal Nature. [More]
Rockefeller scientists study molecular mechanism that causes linker cell death in worms

Rockefeller scientists study molecular mechanism that causes linker cell death in worms

Some cells are meant to live, and some are meant to die. The linker cell of Caenorhabditis elegans, a tiny worm that is a favored model organism for biologists, is among those destined for termination. [More]
Liu Laboratory at Augusta University studies exosomes using Particle Metrix’s ZetaView

Liu Laboratory at Augusta University studies exosomes using Particle Metrix’s ZetaView

Particle Metrix, developers of versatile particle characterization solutions for the life sciences, report on the work in the Liu Laboratory at Augusta University which is studying exosomes where size and concentration are critical parameters. [More]
CHMP recommends conditional marketing authorisation for Janssen’s daratumumab

CHMP recommends conditional marketing authorisation for Janssen’s daratumumab

Janssen-Cilag announced today that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has recommended the granting of a conditional marketing authorisation for first-in-class CD38 immunotherapy daratumumab in the European Union. [More]
U of S-led researchers develop novel class of compounds for effective cancer treatment

U of S-led researchers develop novel class of compounds for effective cancer treatment

A novel class of compounds developed by a University of Saskatchewan-led research team could yield more effective and less toxic chemotherapy drugs to treat cancer. [More]
Embryos with abnormalities in initial stages of pregnancy may grow into healthy babies

Embryos with abnormalities in initial stages of pregnancy may grow into healthy babies

Abnormal cells in the early embryo are not necessarily a sign that a baby will be born with a birth defect such as Down's syndrome, suggests new research carried out in mice at the University of Cambridge. In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, scientists show that abnormal cells are eliminated and replaced by healthy cells, repairing - and in many cases completely fixing - the embryo. [More]
UGA investigators find viable treatment for prostate cancer

UGA investigators find viable treatment for prostate cancer

Researchers at the University of Georgia have created a new therapeutic for prostate cancer that has shown great efficacy in mouse models of the disease. They published their findings recently in the journal Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. [More]

Research shows how recreational ketamine abuse harms the bladder

Research conducted by scientists at the University of York has revealed how recreational ketamine abuse damages the bladder [More]
Cell-based tests reveal no activity in cells exposed to vapour from Vype ePen

Cell-based tests reveal no activity in cells exposed to vapour from Vype ePen

A series of cell-based tests developed to compare the biological impact of cigarette smoke with e-cigarette vapour revealed no activity in cells exposed to vapour from Vype ePen, a commercially available e-cigarette. [More]
New drug shows promise against mesothelioma

New drug shows promise against mesothelioma

A new drug is showing promise as a treatment for mesothelioma - one of the most lethal cancers of all. [More]
Delivering microRNAs in cancer treatment: an interview with Dr Conde and Prof Artzi

Delivering microRNAs in cancer treatment: an interview with Dr Conde and Prof Artzi

microRNAs (miRs) are small endogenous noncoding RNA molecules (20–23 nucleotides) derived from imperfectly paired hairpin RNA structures naturally encoded in the genome that act specifically as triggering molecules to control translational repression or mRNA degradation. [More]
New drug combination treatment makes breast cancer tumours disappear in just 11 days

New drug combination treatment makes breast cancer tumours disappear in just 11 days

Approximately a quarter of women with HER2 positive breast cancer, who were treated with a combination of the targeted drugs lapatinib and trastuzumab before surgery and chemotherapy, saw their tumours shrink significantly or even disappear, according to results from a clinical trial. [More]
Researchers uncover antitumoral nature of maslinic acid in colon cancer cells

Researchers uncover antitumoral nature of maslinic acid in colon cancer cells

Researchers from the University of Granada, in collaboration with the universities of Barcelona and Jaen, have brought to light the antitumoral nature of maslinic acid (a compound derived from olives) in Caco-2 p53-deficient colon adenocarcinoma cells in the short term. [More]
STING agonists developed to induce cellular death in B cell malignancies

STING agonists developed to induce cellular death in B cell malignancies

In almost every mammalian cell, you will find the endoplasmic reticulum, a network of continuous membranes responsible for controlling metabolism as well as the folding, assembly and secretion of proteins. [More]
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