Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
Studying blood stored in plastic blood bags with Renishaw’s inVia™ Raman microscopy

Studying blood stored in plastic blood bags with Renishaw’s inVia™ Raman microscopy

The Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia, Canada, is leading the way in the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for monitoring biochemical changes and inter-donor variability in stored red blood cell (RBC) units. [More]
TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

When adults develop blood cancer, they are frequently diagnosed with what is referred to as acute myeloid leukemia. [More]
Review highlights interconnected roles of apoptosis, cellular senescence in cancer and aging

Review highlights interconnected roles of apoptosis, cellular senescence in cancer and aging

A common feature of cancer and aging is cells' reduced ability to respond to stress-induced damage to DNA or cellular structures. [More]
Single dose of new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after mTBI

Single dose of new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after mTBI

A new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after a mild traumatic brain injury, according to Hebrew University of Jerusalem scientists. [More]
Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists have identified for the first time the 'cell of origin' - in other words, the first cell from which the cancer grows - in basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, and followed the chain of events that lead to the growth of these invasive tumours. [More]
New diagnostic blood test may offer hope for transplant recipients through analysis of cfDNA

New diagnostic blood test may offer hope for transplant recipients through analysis of cfDNA

When cells die, whether through apoptosis or necrosis, the DNA and other molecules found in those cells don't just disappear. They wind up in the blood stream, where degraded bits and pieces can be extracted. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Sometimes, the silencing of a gene is as important as its activation. Nonetheless, up to now, most studies on hormone-mediated gene regulation have focused on researching the factors that influence the activation of certain genes. Little attention has been paid to gene silencing. [More]
Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Cancerous tumors must be fed. Their unregulated growth requires a steady stream of blood flow and nutrients. Thus, one way that researchers have tried to wipe out cancer is to target cells undergoing the metabolic shifts that enable a tumor's rapid growth. [More]
Review sheds light on current therapeutic targets of miRNA-associated chemoresistance in EOC

Review sheds light on current therapeutic targets of miRNA-associated chemoresistance in EOC

Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal disease among gynecologic malignancies. Patients with an advanced disease often relapse due to the development of chemoresistance. Chemotherapy failure is a consequence of acquired drug resistance which may potentially be due to multiple mechanisms including miRNA-mediated gene regulation. [More]
TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new method for finding drug candidates that bind to specific proteins. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
PharmaMar announces initiation of pivotal plitidepsin clinical trial in patients with T-cell lymphomas

PharmaMar announces initiation of pivotal plitidepsin clinical trial in patients with T-cell lymphomas

PharmaMar today announced the start of a multicenter, prospective, pivotal study to analyze the efficacy of the antitumoral compound of marine origin, plitidepsin in patients with relapsed and refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. [More]
Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

A new study suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma (GB), the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer. [More]
New effort in biomedical engineering may improve heart repair

New effort in biomedical engineering may improve heart repair

Jianyi "Jay" Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., brought his biomedical engineering expertise to the University of Alabama at Birmingham to fix hearts. [More]
Drug candidate delivered by plant-virus-based carrier shows promise for triple-negative breast cancer

Drug candidate delivered by plant-virus-based carrier shows promise for triple-negative breast cancer

In a pair of firsts, researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have shown that the drug candidate phenanthriplatin can be more effective than an approved drug in vivo, and that a plant-virus-based carrier successfully delivers a drug in vivo. [More]
Researchers explore use of miR-192 as clinical marker for pancreatic cancer

Researchers explore use of miR-192 as clinical marker for pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is regarded as the cancer type with the lowest survival rates. Fewer than seven in 100 patients survive the first five years after diagnosis. Clinicians attribute this devastating prognosis to two circumstances: Pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms and by the time they are detected they have already reached a very advanced stage in most cases. [More]
Researchers design ProAgio protein that may potentially treat cancer, other illnesses

Researchers design ProAgio protein that may potentially treat cancer, other illnesses

A protein designed by researchers at Georgia State University can effectively target a cell surface receptor linked to a number of diseases, showing potential as a therapeutic treatment for an array of illnesses, including cancer, according to the research team. [More]
Novel way of directly activating Bak protein can trigger cell death

Novel way of directly activating Bak protein can trigger cell death

Melbourne researchers have discovered a new way of triggering cell death, in a finding that could lead to drugs to treat cancer and autoimmune disease. [More]
Cornell researchers develop nanoparticle-based drug delivery mechanism for combination cancer therapy

Cornell researchers develop nanoparticle-based drug delivery mechanism for combination cancer therapy

A team of researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York demonstrated a drug delivery mechanism that utilizes two independent vehicles, allowing for delivery of chemically and physically dis-tinct agents. [More]
Researchers identify potential ways in which cancer cells may develop resistance to BET inhibitors

Researchers identify potential ways in which cancer cells may develop resistance to BET inhibitors

A team of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers has worked out how a new class of anti-cancer drugs kills cancer cells, a finding that helps explain how cancer cells may become resistant to treatment. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement