Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
Combining chemotherapy and birinapant effective against high-grade serous ovarian cancer

Combining chemotherapy and birinapant effective against high-grade serous ovarian cancer

High-grade serous ovarian cancer often responds well to the chemotherapy drug carboplatin, but why it so frequently comes back after treatment has been a medical mystery. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
Protecting gastrointestinal system during radiation or chemotherapy allows patients to tolerate cancer treatments

Protecting gastrointestinal system during radiation or chemotherapy allows patients to tolerate cancer treatments

The stem cells in our gut divide so fast that they create a completely new population of epithelial cells every week. But this quick division is also why radiation and chemotherapy wreak havoc on the gastrointestinal systems of cancer patients - such therapies target rapidly dividing cells. [More]
Researchers develop dynamic functional mouse model for lung injury repair

Researchers develop dynamic functional mouse model for lung injury repair

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and The Saban Research Institute of CHLA have created a dynamic functional mouse model for lung injury repair, a tool that will help scientists explain the origins of lung disease and provide a system by which new therapies can be identified and tested. [More]
Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

The Genetics Society of America and the C. elegans research community are pleased to announce the recipients of the GSA poster awards at the 20th International C. elegans Meeting, which took place at the University of California, Los Angeles, June 24-28, 2015. [More]
PharmaMar, TTY Biopharm sign agreement to market and distribute APLIDIN (plitidepsin) in Taiwan

PharmaMar, TTY Biopharm sign agreement to market and distribute APLIDIN (plitidepsin) in Taiwan

PharmaMar has entered into an exclusive license and commercialization agreement with the pharmaceutical company TTY Biopharm to market and distribute the drug candidate APLIDIN (plitidepsin) in Taiwan. Under the terms of the agreement, PharmaMar will receive an upfront payment, royalties and additional remunerations for regulatory milestones achieved by APLIDIN (plitidepsin). [More]
UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

Tapping the potential of metabolomics, an emerging field focused on the chemical processes of metabolism, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new and pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease. [More]
Dartmouth researchers perform first total syntheses of compounds involved in rapid cell death in leukemia

Dartmouth researchers perform first total syntheses of compounds involved in rapid cell death in leukemia

Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues have carried out the first total syntheses of certain compounds involved in excessive cell death in leukemia. [More]
New research offers potential for early intervention to prevent neurodegenerative diseases

New research offers potential for early intervention to prevent neurodegenerative diseases

New research led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center provides the first direct evidence linking traumatic brain injury to Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- and offers the potential for early intervention to prevent the development of these debilitating neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal how mutations in specific autism risk gene alter pattern of early brain development

TSRI scientists reveal how mutations in specific autism risk gene alter pattern of early brain development

As early as 1943, when autism was first described by psychiatrist Leo Kanner, reports were made that some, but not all, children with autism spectrum disorder have relatively enlarged heads. But even today, more than half a century later, the exact cause of this early abnormal growth of the head and brain has remained unclear. [More]
Researchers discover molecule that may favour production of induced pluripotent cells

Researchers discover molecule that may favour production of induced pluripotent cells

Since 2006, research has succeeded in generating, from specialised adult cells, induced pluripotent cells (iPS cells), with huge potential applications, particularly for regenerative medicine. However, the process has still not been completely mastered. Two teams of researchers from Inserm, CNRS, Centre Léon Bérard and Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University have discovered a molecule that may favour the production of these induced stem cells. [More]
Finding could help improve health and function of the kidney in elderly people

Finding could help improve health and function of the kidney in elderly people

As advances in medicine allow individuals to live longer, people are facing unique age-related health challenges. As they age, organs such as the kidneys become more susceptible to injury, and their ability to self-repair is decreased. Researchers from the University of Missouri have found a cellular signal that causes kidney cells to die, making the kidneys prone to injury. [More]
Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Peripheral nerve injuries often are caused by trauma or surgical complications and can result in considerable disabilities. Regeneration of peripheral nerves can be accomplished effectively using autologous (self-donated) nerve grafts, but that procedure may sacrifice a functional nerve and cause loss of sensation in another part of the patient's body. [More]
Review article provides in depth survey of studies focusing on retinoblastoma protein's role in apoptosis

Review article provides in depth survey of studies focusing on retinoblastoma protein's role in apoptosis

Retinoblastoma protein RB1, which is named after a form of pediatric tumor of the eye, is among the most common genetically regulated cellular proteins to malfunction in human cancer. RB1 was also the first tumor suppressor gene to be identified and its modes of inactivation in retinoblastoma tumors provided the basis for the ground-breaking two-hit hypothesis by the geneticist Alfred G. Knudson in the 70s, according to which cancer is due to the accumulation of multiple 'hits' or mutations in certain genes. [More]
What do cells really look like in 3D?

What do cells really look like in 3D?

Nanolive SA, a start-up company founded in November 2013 at the EPFL Innovation Park in Lausanne, Switzerland, has developed a revolutionary microscope which allows for the very first time the exploration of a living cell in 3D without damaging it. [More]
New chemical compound reduces pancreatic cancer tumour growth by 80% in mice

New chemical compound reduces pancreatic cancer tumour growth by 80% in mice

Scientists from UCL (University College London) have designed a chemical compound that has reduced the growth of pancreatic cancer tumours by 80 percent in treated mice. [More]
Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Obesity is caused by numerous and complex factors, some of which are as yet unsuspected. Scientists from the CNRS, INSERM, UPMC and Université Paris Descartes, working with research clinicians from Paris Public Hospitals (AP-HP) have now shown that severe obesity is accompanied by inflammation of the small intestine and enhanced immune response in that region. [More]
OphthaliX enters into definitive agreement to purchase Improved Vision Systems

OphthaliX enters into definitive agreement to purchase Improved Vision Systems

OphthaliX Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutic products for the treatment of ophthalmic disorders and a subsidiary of Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., announced today it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Israel-based Improved Vision Systems Ltd. in a stock-for-stock transaction. [More]
Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

A little more than a decade ago, researchers discovered that all cells secrete tiny communications modules jammed with an entire work crew of messages for other cells. Today, a team of researchers, led by stem cell researcher Raj Kishore, PhD, Director of the Stem Cell Therapy Program at the Center for Translational Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, is harnessing the communications vesicles excreted by stem cells and using them to induce the damaged heart to repair itself. [More]
DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

Although traditionally understood to induce death in cancer cells, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that the DAPK1 protein is actually essential for growth in breast and other cancers with mutations in the TP53 gene. This discovery indicates DAPK1 may be a promising new therapeutic target for many of the most aggressive cancers. [More]
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