Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
Researchers reveal how ultrasmall nanoparticles can kill cancer cells

Researchers reveal how ultrasmall nanoparticles can kill cancer cells

Nanoparticles known as Cornell dots, or C dots, have shown great promise as a therapeutic tool in the detection and treatment of cancer. [More]
Scientists discover new switch that coordinates DNA repair and cell death

Scientists discover new switch that coordinates DNA repair and cell death

The genetic information of every cell is encoded in the sequence of the DNA double helix. Double strand breaks in the DNA, which can be induced by radiation, are a dangerous threat to the cells, and if not properly repaired can lead to cancer. [More]
Columbia researchers find way to reawaken potent cancer-fighting molecule in tumor cells

Columbia researchers find way to reawaken potent cancer-fighting molecule in tumor cells

A potent cancer-fighting molecule in our cells can be reawakened by reducing levels of a protein - called SET - that's often found in excess in cancer cells, a new study from Columbia University's Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center has found. [More]
Researchers identify genes that regulate cellular senescence

Researchers identify genes that regulate cellular senescence

A research group including Professor KAMADA Shinji, Research Fellow NAGANO Taiki (both from the Kobe University Biosignal Research Center), and Unit Chief ENARI Masato (National Cancer Research Institute) has succeeded in identifying genes that control cellular senescence - permanently arrested cell growth. [More]
New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials. [More]
Experimental drug may become key tool to target triple-negative breast cancer with immunotherapy

Experimental drug may become key tool to target triple-negative breast cancer with immunotherapy

Previous studies at the University of Colorado Cancer Center show that the experimental drug AMPI-109 potently kills triple-negative breast cancer cells. [More]
Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV has announced the submission of a Type II variation application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), seeking to broaden the existing marketing authorisation for the immunotherapy DARZALEX® (daratumumab) to include treatment of adult patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The expanded indication is based on daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide (an immmunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone, or bortezomib (a PI) and dexamethasone. [More]
Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Before I explain the discovery, I would take a step back and explain an interesting event that takes place in the cancer cells. Normal cells follow a rapid and irreversible process to efficiently eradicate dysfunctional cells. This is a natural process by which damaged cells commit ‘suicide’. This process is known as apoptosis or programmed cell death. [More]
BCL-2 inhibitor shows promise in AML patients

BCL-2 inhibitor shows promise in AML patients

Patients whose acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) had relapsed or was resistant to chemotherapy and those who were deemed unable to tolerate chemotherapy experienced responses to the selective BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax (Venclexta), with complete remissions in some, according to phase II clinical trial data. [More]
SBP board member donates $1M for researchers to study pancreatic and prostate cancer

SBP board member donates $1M for researchers to study pancreatic and prostate cancer

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) has received a $1M donation from The Epstein Family Foundation for scientists to study pancreatic and prostate cancer. [More]
Studying blood stored in plastic blood bags with Renishaw’s inVia™ Raman microscopy

Studying blood stored in plastic blood bags with Renishaw’s inVia™ Raman microscopy

The Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia, Canada, is leading the way in the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for monitoring biochemical changes and inter-donor variability in stored red blood cell (RBC) units. [More]
TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

When adults develop blood cancer, they are frequently diagnosed with what is referred to as acute myeloid leukemia. [More]
Review highlights interconnected roles of apoptosis, cellular senescence in cancer and aging

Review highlights interconnected roles of apoptosis, cellular senescence in cancer and aging

A common feature of cancer and aging is cells' reduced ability to respond to stress-induced damage to DNA or cellular structures. [More]
Single dose of new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after mTBI

Single dose of new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after mTBI

A new molecule could protect the brain from cognitive impairments after a mild traumatic brain injury, according to Hebrew University of Jerusalem scientists. [More]
Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists detect first cell from which tumour grows in skin cancers

Scientists have identified for the first time the 'cell of origin' - in other words, the first cell from which the cancer grows - in basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, and followed the chain of events that lead to the growth of these invasive tumours. [More]
New diagnostic blood test may offer hope for transplant recipients through analysis of cfDNA

New diagnostic blood test may offer hope for transplant recipients through analysis of cfDNA

When cells die, whether through apoptosis or necrosis, the DNA and other molecules found in those cells don't just disappear. They wind up in the blood stream, where degraded bits and pieces can be extracted. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Sometimes, the silencing of a gene is as important as its activation. Nonetheless, up to now, most studies on hormone-mediated gene regulation have focused on researching the factors that influence the activation of certain genes. Little attention has been paid to gene silencing. [More]
Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Mitochondrial stress can trigger tumor-related metabolic shifts, study finds

Cancerous tumors must be fed. Their unregulated growth requires a steady stream of blood flow and nutrients. Thus, one way that researchers have tried to wipe out cancer is to target cells undergoing the metabolic shifts that enable a tumor's rapid growth. [More]
Review sheds light on current therapeutic targets of miRNA-associated chemoresistance in EOC

Review sheds light on current therapeutic targets of miRNA-associated chemoresistance in EOC

Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal disease among gynecologic malignancies. Patients with an advanced disease often relapse due to the development of chemoresistance. Chemotherapy failure is a consequence of acquired drug resistance which may potentially be due to multiple mechanisms including miRNA-mediated gene regulation. [More]
TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new method for finding drug candidates that bind to specific proteins. [More]
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