Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital entered the next era of cardiac care by opening a new $20 million Heart Institute on Feb. 10, 2014. St. Joseph's Hospital Heart Institute is one of the most advanced and comprehensive centers for cardiovascular medicine in Florida, performing more than 50,000 adult cardiac catheterizations. It is also has the only pediatric catheterization program in Hillsborough County. [More]
New MRI can predict which atrial fibrillation patients are most likely to benefit from catheter ablation

New MRI can predict which atrial fibrillation patients are most likely to benefit from catheter ablation

A new type of contrast MRI can predict which heart patients with atrial fibrillation are most likely to benefit from a treatment called catheter ablation, according to a landmark multi-center study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Clinical rule stratifies CAP patients’ cardiac risk

Clinical rule stratifies CAP patients’ cardiac risk

Researchers have generated and validated a clinical rule that accurately stratifies patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia according to their risk for cardiac complications. [More]
BMC reduced audible alarms as a way to combat alarm fatigue, improve patient safety

BMC reduced audible alarms as a way to combat alarm fatigue, improve patient safety

Boston Medical Center (BMC) successfully reduced audible alarms as a way to combat alarm fatigue and improve patient safety. The hospital, one of two in the country that spearheaded this issue, implemented a novel cost-effective approach during a six-week pilot program that resulted in a drastic drop in audible alarms. [More]
New study finds that Americans had more health concerns during the recession

New study finds that Americans had more health concerns during the recession

We ring in the New Year with hopes of being healthy, wealthy, and wise. A new study led by San Diego State University School of Public Health research professor John W. Ayers suggests that from a public health standpoint, health and wealth may be connected. [More]

Ihealth unveils new wearable personal health devices at CES 2014

Today, iHealth Lab Inc., announced the extension of its suite of personal mobile health devices to include a line of wearable products designed to provide monitoring over an extended period of time. [More]

iRhythm Technologies’ ZIO Service detects more cardiac arrhythmias than Holter monitor

iRhythm Technologies, a healthcare information services company, today announced that a prospective study by Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) has found that use of the company's ZIO Service significantly increased detection of cardiac arrhythmias, compared to use of the traditional Holter monitor. [More]

STSI researchers develop a small wireless device that detects abnormal, dangerous heart rhythms

​Research by the Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) has found that a small adhesive wireless device worn on the chest for up to two weeks does a better job detecting abnormal and potentially dangerous heart rhythms than the Holter monitor, which is typically used for 24 hours and has been the standard of care for more than 50 years. [More]
Copenhagen scientists study link between congenital arrhythmia and hypoglycemia

Copenhagen scientists study link between congenital arrhythmia and hypoglycemia

In a new study, scientists from University of Copenhagen document a connection between congenital arrhythmia and the bodies' ability to handle sugar. The results can be of vital importance for patients with the disease and for the future treatment of diabetes. The new study has just been published in the scientific journal Diabetes. [More]

Study identifies atrial fibrillation as a growing and serious global health problem

Atrial fibrillation, long considered the most common condition leading to an irregular heartbeat, is a growing and serious global health problem, according to the first study ever to estimate the condition's worldwide prevalence, death rates and societal costs. [More]
FDA advisory committee votes in favor of WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage Closure device

FDA advisory committee votes in favor of WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage Closure device

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee voted favorably by a majority, Yes: 13, No: 1, that the benefits of the WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage Closure device outweigh the risks. [More]
INTENSIA family of ICDs and CRT-D devices receive CE mark approval

INTENSIA family of ICDs and CRT-D devices receive CE mark approval

Sorin Group, a global medical company and a leader in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, announced today that the INTENSIA family of implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices received CE (Conformité Européenne) mark approval. This family of devices includes the single-chamber INTENSIA VR, the dual-chamber INTENSIA DR and the INTENSIA SonR® CRT-D devices, all of which feature a DF-4 high voltage connector. [More]

Study: Unfolded protein response can increase risk of sudden cardiac death

A researcher at the Cardiovascular Institute (CVI) at Rhode Island, The Miriam and Newport hospitals has found a link to human heart failure that if blocked, may reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death. [More]
Sorin Group receives CE Mark approval for Solo Smart stentless aortic valve

Sorin Group receives CE Mark approval for Solo Smart stentless aortic valve

Sorin Group, a global medical company and a leader in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, announced today that it has received CE Mark approval for the Solo Smart stentless aortic valve. [More]
Researchers engineering first-ever living, three-dimensional human arrhythmic tissue

Researchers engineering first-ever living, three-dimensional human arrhythmic tissue

A foundational study published in top biomedical journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) this week by researchers at the University of Toronto's Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering and the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine have identified the optimal structure and cell ratio associated with heart function - and the discovery has already led the team to another research first: the engineering of the first-ever living, three-dimensional human arrhythmic tissue. [More]
Study identifies possible link between sudden drops in blood pressure and irregular heartbeat

Study identifies possible link between sudden drops in blood pressure and irregular heartbeat

Results of a Johns Hopkins-led study have identified a possible link between a history of sudden drops in blood pressure and the most common form of irregular heartbeat. [More]
Study identifies possible link between orthostatic hypotension and atrial fibrillation

Study identifies possible link between orthostatic hypotension and atrial fibrillation

Results of a Johns Hopkins-led study have identified a possible link between a history of sudden drops in blood pressure and the most common form of irregular heartbeat. [More]
Johns Hopkins undergraduate students win first and third prize in national Collegiate Inventors Competition

Johns Hopkins undergraduate students win first and third prize in national Collegiate Inventors Competition

A Johns Hopkins undergraduate biomedical engineering student team that devised a two-part system to improve the way life-saving shocks are delivered to hearts has earned first prize in the undergraduate division of the national Collegiate Inventors Competition. [More]
ZOLL Medical announces establishment of ZOLL Foundation

ZOLL Medical announces establishment of ZOLL Foundation

ZOLL Medical Corporation, a manufacturer of medical devices and related software solutions, announced today the establishment of the ZOLL Foundation, an independent entity organized for scientific and educational purposes. [More]

Students invent system to shock irregular heart back into normal rhythm more safely and effectively

Johns Hopkins undergraduate students have invented a system to shock a dangerously irregular heart back into normal rhythm more safely and effectively. [More]