Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
The American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society Unite to Improve Cardiovascular Research, Care

The American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society Unite to Improve Cardiovascular Research, Care

The American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society today announced a collaboration designed to advance research and improve the delivery of care for people with an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
Researchers find way to predict occurrence of some cardiac arrhythmias

Researchers find way to predict occurrence of some cardiac arrhythmias

Researchers have discovered how to predict some cardiac arrhythmias several steps before they even occur. It's a finding that could lead to an improved cardiac device, with equipment designed to detect when arrhythmias are about to occur and then act to prevent them. [More]
Scripps becomes first health care provider in San Diego County to implant Evera MRI SureScan ICD System

Scripps becomes first health care provider in San Diego County to implant Evera MRI SureScan ICD System

Scripps Health is the first health care provider in San Diego County to use the only implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) device approved for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. [More]
Novo Nordisk announces FDA approval of Tresiba (insulin degludec injection) for diabetes treatment

Novo Nordisk announces FDA approval of Tresiba (insulin degludec injection) for diabetes treatment

Novo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes care, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new drug application for Tresiba (insulin degludec injection), a once-daily, long-acting basal insulin. Tresiba is indicated for use alone, or in combination with oral antidiabetic medicines or bolus insulin, and is approved for glycemic control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Tresiba provides a long duration of action beyond 42 hours. [More]
New genetic cause identified for congenital heart arrhythmia

New genetic cause identified for congenital heart arrhythmia

Scientists at The Ohio State University Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute have identified a new genetic cause for congenital heart arrhythmia. The results of their research are published online by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). [More]
Adolescents with bulimia nervosa recover faster when parents involved in treatment

Adolescents with bulimia nervosa recover faster when parents involved in treatment

Involving parents in the treatment of adolescents with bulimia nervosa is more effective than treating the patient individually, according to a study led by Daniel Le Grange, PhD, Benioff UCSF Professor in children's health in the departments of psychiatry and pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco, and James Lock, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Scientists identify new drug target to treat heart arrhythmias

Scientists identify new drug target to treat heart arrhythmias

Scientists at The Ohio State University Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute have identified a new target they hope will help make the next drug discovery for patients suffering from heart arrhythmias happen sooner. [More]

Resin contains substances that may cure epilepsy, say Linköping University researchers

Sticky resin from conifers contains substances that could relieve or cure epilepsy. Researchers at Linköping University have synthesized and tested 71 substances known as resin acids, of which twelve are prime candidates for new medicines. [More]
Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital's Richard G. Cartledge, MD, FACS, has begun performing ultra-minimally invasive left atrial appendage ligation for atrial fibrillation patients who are on anticoagulants such as Coumadin, Xarelto or Effient. Dr. Cartledge, who is Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Hospital, is one of a select group of surgeons nationally using this method, which involves making two microscopic incisions in order to seal off the left atrial appendage (LAA) in patients where anticoagulants are contraindicated or who refuse to be on such medications. [More]
GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

The first-ever two-year outcomes from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) showcased at ESC Congress 2015 expose that all-cause death was the most frequent major event in more than 17,000 newly diagnosed AF patients, far exceeding the rate of stroke or major bleeding. [More]
Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

A gene associated with sudden cardiac death in the general population has been identified using implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) monitoring in research presented for the first time at ESC Congress today. [More]
Additional electrical isolation of left atrial appendage could improve freedom from AF

Additional electrical isolation of left atrial appendage could improve freedom from AF

In patients with long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) despite standard treatment, additional electrical isolation of an area called the left atrial appendage (LAA) can improve freedom from AF without increasing complications, results of the BELIEF study show. [More]
MRA therapy does not improve outcome in heart attack patients without heart failure

MRA therapy does not improve outcome in heart attack patients without heart failure

Heart attack patients without heart failure derive no benefit from the addition of mineralocortoid receptor antagonists (MRA), to standard therapy, results of the ALBATROSS study show. [More]
High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

Obese atrial fibrillation patients have a lower chance of arrhythmia recurrence if they have high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk continues to decline as exercise capacity increases as part of treatment, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Cyberonics, Sorin provide update on pending business combination

Cyberonics, Sorin provide update on pending business combination

Cyberonics, Inc. and Sorin S.p.A. today announced an update on various matters relating to their pending business combination (the "Transaction"). [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]
Delaying surgery until clinical triggers emerge leads to increased mortality in patients with mitral regurgitation

Delaying surgery until clinical triggers emerge leads to increased mortality in patients with mitral regurgitation

Patients with mitral regurgitation face a dilemma of whether to undergo corrective surgery early, when they might have no or few symptoms, or wait until their condition worsens. Current guidelines allow for watchful waiting until certain symptoms appear that would then "trigger" the decision to proceed with surgery. [More]
Researchers identify first gene that causes common form of mitral valve prolapse

Researchers identify first gene that causes common form of mitral valve prolapse

An international research collaboration led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified the first gene in which mutations cause the common form of mitral valve prolapse (MVP), a heart valve disorder that affects almost 2.5 percent of the population. [More]
Lund University researchers discovered 'main switch' that regulates cell invaginations

Lund University researchers discovered 'main switch' that regulates cell invaginations

Lack of microinvaginations in the cell membrane, caveolae, can cause serious diseases such as lipodystrophy and muscular dystrophy. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered a "main switch" that regulates the formation of these invaginations. [More]
One in four people with implanted defibrillators experiences improvements in heart function

One in four people with implanted defibrillators experiences improvements in heart function

A Johns Hopkins-led study of outcomes among 1,200 people with implanted defibrillators -- devices intended to prevent sudden cardiac death from abnormal heart rhythms -- shows that within a few years of implantation, one in four experienced improvements in heart function substantial enough to put them over the clinical threshold that qualified them to get a defibrillator in the first place. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement