Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Stem cell therapy may benefit patients with debilitating heart failure

Stem cell therapy may benefit patients with debilitating heart failure

Researchers want to know whether patients with debilitating heart failure can benefit by having their own stem cells injected into their ailing heart muscle. [More]
University of Michigan uses Medtronic Reveal LINQ ICM System to monitor heart-related problems

University of Michigan uses Medtronic Reveal LINQ ICM System to monitor heart-related problems

The University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center is one of the nation's first hospitals to use the Medtronic Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM) System, the smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device available. [More]
Respicardia receives Best Innovation of 2014 award from CRT and CV Pipeline for remedē System

Respicardia receives Best Innovation of 2014 award from CRT and CV Pipeline for remedē System

Respicardia, Inc., a developer of implantable therapies to improve respiratory and cardiovascular health, announced that it has been awarded the Best Innovation of 2014 from Cardiovascular Research Technologies (CRT) and CV Pipeline for the remedē System, the first and only implantable device for the treatment of central sleep apnea. [More]
Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

From new cancer treatments to an exploration of how technology affects the adolescent brain, the innovative research of America's future scientists, engineers and inventors took center stage in the nation's capital today. [More]
Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems in the two hours immediately afterwards, according to the first study to systematically evaluate previous research into the link between the extreme emotion and all cardiovascular outcomes. [More]
Doctors devise new way to treat atrial fibrillation

Doctors devise new way to treat atrial fibrillation

Doctors in the U.S. and Japan have devised a way to treat atrial fibrillation by adding a little alcohol to minimally invasive therapies that target a cluster of misbehaving nerves known to trigger arrhythmia. In the most recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology (online before print), the researchers say the new therapy may dull or stop the transmission of electrical impulses that cause atrial fibrillation. [More]
Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Call it what you will - getting red in the face, hot under the collar, losing your cool, blowing your top - we all experience anger. And while we know that anger is a normal, sometimes even beneficial emotion, we're also aware of the often harmful connection between anger and health. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical shows an even more compelling reason to think about getting anger in check - a nearly fivefold increase in risk for heart attack in the two hours following outbursts of anger. [More]
CCNAP highlights psychological issues related to cardiac diseases

CCNAP highlights psychological issues related to cardiac diseases

The congress will be held 4-5 April in Stavanger, Norway, at the Stavanger Forum. [More]
Scripps Green Hospital first to implant world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device

Scripps Green Hospital first to implant world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device

Scripps Green Hospital has become the first hospital in the United States to implant the world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device. Scripps Clinic cardiologist John Rogers, M.D., successfully completed the first implant of the Reveal LINQ- Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM) in 71-year-old San Diego resident Chuck Beal on Saturday. [More]
Scientists create 3-D elastic membrane that is precisely shaped to match heart's epicardium

Scientists create 3-D elastic membrane that is precisely shaped to match heart's epicardium

Igor Efimov, PhD, at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis and an international team of biomedical engineers and materials scientists have created a 3-D elastic membrane made of a soft, flexible, silicon material that is precisely shaped to match the heart's epicardium, or the outer layer of the wall of the heart. [More]
Study shows one-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of AF

Study shows one-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of AF

​One-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to the latest survey of European practice. [More]
Discovery could lead to improved early detection, prevention strategies for sudden cardiac death

Discovery could lead to improved early detection, prevention strategies for sudden cardiac death

UC Irvine researchers have found a specific genetic flaw that is connected to sudden death due to heart arrhythmia - a leading cause of mortality for adults around the world. [More]
Study reveals overall success rate of AF ablation in Europe

Study reveals overall success rate of AF ablation in Europe

One-quarter of high risk patients do not receive anticoagulants after ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to the latest survey of European practice. [More]
St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital entered the next era of cardiac care by opening a new $20 million Heart Institute on Feb. 10, 2014. St. Joseph's Hospital Heart Institute is one of the most advanced and comprehensive centers for cardiovascular medicine in Florida, performing more than 50,000 adult cardiac catheterizations. It is also has the only pediatric catheterization program in Hillsborough County. [More]
New MRI can predict which atrial fibrillation patients are most likely to benefit from catheter ablation

New MRI can predict which atrial fibrillation patients are most likely to benefit from catheter ablation

A new type of contrast MRI can predict which heart patients with atrial fibrillation are most likely to benefit from a treatment called catheter ablation, according to a landmark multi-center study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Clinical rule stratifies CAP patients’ cardiac risk

Clinical rule stratifies CAP patients’ cardiac risk

Researchers have generated and validated a clinical rule that accurately stratifies patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia according to their risk for cardiac complications. [More]
BMC reduced audible alarms as a way to combat alarm fatigue, improve patient safety

BMC reduced audible alarms as a way to combat alarm fatigue, improve patient safety

Boston Medical Center (BMC) successfully reduced audible alarms as a way to combat alarm fatigue and improve patient safety. The hospital, one of two in the country that spearheaded this issue, implemented a novel cost-effective approach during a six-week pilot program that resulted in a drastic drop in audible alarms. [More]
New study finds that Americans had more health concerns during the recession

New study finds that Americans had more health concerns during the recession

We ring in the New Year with hopes of being healthy, wealthy, and wise. A new study led by San Diego State University School of Public Health research professor John W. Ayers suggests that from a public health standpoint, health and wealth may be connected. [More]
Ihealth unveils new wearable personal health devices at CES 2014

Ihealth unveils new wearable personal health devices at CES 2014

Today, iHealth Lab Inc., announced the extension of its suite of personal mobile health devices to include a line of wearable products designed to provide monitoring over an extended period of time. [More]
iRhythm Technologies’ ZIO Service detects more cardiac arrhythmias than Holter monitor

iRhythm Technologies’ ZIO Service detects more cardiac arrhythmias than Holter monitor

iRhythm Technologies, a healthcare information services company, today announced that a prospective study by Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) has found that use of the company's ZIO Service significantly increased detection of cardiac arrhythmias, compared to use of the traditional Holter monitor. [More]