Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
AF linked to increased cancer risk in women

AF linked to increased cancer risk in women

Women with new-onset atrial fibrillation have a significantly increased cancer risk for at least 1 year after AF diagnosis, an analysis of Women's Health Study data shows. [More]
UPMC study gives better understanding of cardiac arrhythmia following lung transplantation

UPMC study gives better understanding of cardiac arrhythmia following lung transplantation

Cardiac arrhythmia is a common complication following lung transplantation, and one that has a significant negative impact on long-term patient survival, reports a team of UPMC researchers in the largest study of its kind to date. [More]
AF-related symptoms and quality of life worse in women

AF-related symptoms and quality of life worse in women

Women with atrial fibrillation experience more severe symptoms, a lower quality of life and a higher risk of stroke than men, but they have better overall survival, US study data show. [More]
New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

An experimental model uses genetics-guided biomechanics and patient-derived stem cells to predict what type of inherited heart defect a child will develop, according to authors of a new study in the journal Cell. [More]
Targeting rotors challenged for nonparoxsymal AF

Targeting rotors challenged for nonparoxsymal AF

Targeted ablation of electrical rotors and focal sources is not a successful strategy in patients with persistent or long-standing atrial fibrillation, shows the randomised OASIS trial. [More]
Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. [More]
Controlling heart cells using a laser: an interview with Prof. Konstantin Agladze

Controlling heart cells using a laser: an interview with Prof. Konstantin Agladze

We control their electrical activity. Cardiac cells are capable of producing and transmitting electric signals through changes in a cell membrane potential. [More]
Long-term Warfarin use may increase dementia rates in AF patients

Long-term Warfarin use may increase dementia rates in AF patients

A new study of more than 10,000 patients treated long term with the blood thinner, Warfarin, reveals higher rates of dementia for patients with atrial fibrillation versus non-AF patients [More]
Vernakalant drug more effective than Ibutilide in treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation

Vernakalant drug more effective than Ibutilide in treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation

Vernakalant, a new drug for treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation, has proved to be considerably more effective than Ibutilide, an established drug in this indication. It was able to normalize patients' heart rhythm more rapidly and with fewer side-effects ocurring. This was revealed by a study conducted at the Department of Emergency Medicine at Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital that has recently been published in "Europace", a journal of the European Society of Cardiology. [More]
Prompt attention may limit recurrence risk in TIA patients

Prompt attention may limit recurrence risk in TIA patients

Centres with procedures in place for the rapid assessment of patients with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke achieve low recurrence rates in these patients, a multinational study shows. [More]
Scientists find way to control behaviour of cardiomyocytes using laser radiation

Scientists find way to control behaviour of cardiomyocytes using laser radiation

Scientists from MIPT's Laboratory of the Biophysics of Excitable Systems have discovered how to control the behaviour of heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) using laser radiation; this study will help scientists to better understand the mechanisms of the heart and could ultimately provide a method of treating arrhythmia. The paper has been published in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Micra Transcatheter Pacing System approved to treat heart rhythm disorders

Micra Transcatheter Pacing System approved to treat heart rhythm disorders

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first pacemaker that does not require the use of wired leads to provide an electrical connection between the pulse-generating device and the heart. While the Micra Transcatheter Pacing System works like other pacemakers to regulate heart rate, the self-contained, inch-long device is implanted directly in the right ventricle chamber of the heart. [More]
Patient's personal activity tracker, smartphone can help physicians treat new-onset atrial fibrillation

Patient's personal activity tracker, smartphone can help physicians treat new-onset atrial fibrillation

Emergency physicians used a patient's personal activity tracker and smartphone to identify the time his heart arrhythmia started, which allowed them to treat his new-onset atrial fibrillation with electrical cardioversion and discharge him home. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
AliveCor's new Kardia Band for Apple Watch allows people to capture medical-grade EKG anytime, anywhere

AliveCor's new Kardia Band for Apple Watch allows people to capture medical-grade EKG anytime, anywhere

AliveCor, Inc., the leader in FDA-cleared electrocardiogram (EKG) technology for mobile devices, announced today the introduction of the first medical-grade EKG band for the Apple Watch, Kardia Band (pending 510k clearance, available in late spring) along with a new app for smartphones (available now). [More]
Heart rate variability may increase epilepsy risk

Heart rate variability may increase epilepsy risk

Doctors have long characterized epilepsy as a brain disorder, but researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found that part of the autonomic nervous system functions differently in epilepsy during the absence of seizures.This connection to the involuntary division of the nervous system may have implications for diagnosing and treating the disease and understanding sudden unexpected death in epilepsy [More]
Differences in patient education level may compromise safety, efficacy of anticoagulants

Differences in patient education level may compromise safety, efficacy of anticoagulants

Patients with no schooling benefit least from blood thinning medications, reveals a European Heart Rhythm Association / European Society of Cardiology survey published today in Europace. [More]
Some heart disease drugs, antibiotics show promising perspectives in treating cancers

Some heart disease drugs, antibiotics show promising perspectives in treating cancers

North American researchers have identified drugs that showed promising perspectives in treating cancers, according to a recent study published in Cancer Research. [More]
New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

A new blood clotting analysis system designed in Japan makes it easier to determine the effects of taking one or more antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs. [More]
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