Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Some heart disease drugs, antibiotics show promising perspectives in treating cancers

Some heart disease drugs, antibiotics show promising perspectives in treating cancers

North American researchers have identified drugs that showed promising perspectives in treating cancers, according to a recent study published in Cancer Research. [More]
New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

A new blood clotting analysis system designed in Japan makes it easier to determine the effects of taking one or more antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs. [More]
Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

A review of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors highlights the need to consider cardiovascular adverse event risk profiles when prescribing for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Eli Lilly and Company's Humulin R U-500 KwikPen(insulin human injection) 500 units/mL, a pre-filled device containing Humulin R U-500, a highly concentrated formulation of insulin. [More]
Researchers reconstruct 3D images of protein structures that link heart muscle cells in working groups

Researchers reconstruct 3D images of protein structures that link heart muscle cells in working groups

Diseased hearts may be thrown out of rhythm by structural differences -- now visible for the first time -- in protein groups that connect heart muscle cells, according to the authors of a study to be published in the journal Nature Communications online Jan. 20. [More]
Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

A pioneer in developing life-saving therapies for a deadly heart arrhythmia has called on electrophysiologists to reexamine a widely used technique to guide the treatment of the faulty electrical impulses responsible for these abnormal heartbeats. [More]
Electrical stimulation could regulate, synchronize beating properties of nascent heart muscle cells

Electrical stimulation could regulate, synchronize beating properties of nascent heart muscle cells

Columbia Engineering researchers have shown, for the first time, that electrical stimulation of human heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) engineered from human stem cells aids their development and function. [More]
Arrhythmias worth treating in PAH patients

Arrhythmias worth treating in PAH patients

Supraventricular arrhythmias are common in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension but can be successfully managed with standard treatments, a study shows. [More]
Sugary foods may affect recovery from heart attack

Sugary foods may affect recovery from heart attack

Scientists at the University of Leicester have demonstrated for the first time the mechanism by which the level of sugar in your blood can affect the contraction of blood vessels, with potentially dangerous effects on the heart and blood pressure. [More]
Study findings question validity of some genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders

Study findings question validity of some genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders

A review of medical records of patients with genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders found that patients often did not have any symptoms or signs of the conditions, questioning the validity of some genetic variations thought to be related to serious disorders, according to a study in the January 5 issue of JAMA. [More]
Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Johns Hopkins has demonstrated in animals that applying a pacemaker's mild electrical shocks to push the heart in and out of normal synchronized contraction for part of each day may be an effective way to slow down the progression of heart failure, a disorder that afflicts millions of Americans. [More]
Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Recent studies conclude that people with epilepsy have a 27-fold greater risk of sudden death than people without the disorder. However, many of these deaths could be prevented through greater identification of epilepsy as a cause of death, and in educating the public more effectively about the disease's life-threatening dangers. [More]
CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

The presence or absence of the CAP2 gene causes sudden cardiac death in mice, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In particular, the absence of the gene interrupts the animal's ability to send electrical signals to the heart to tell it to contract, a condition called cardiac conduction disease. [More]
Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Pacemakers have been around for a very long time, they're great devices, critical for many people who have slow heartbeats. While they're very effective, they have some issues. There are two main aspects relating to these issues. [More]
STSI launches home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensors to identify people with AFib

STSI launches home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensors to identify people with AFib

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensor technology to identify people with asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
Comorbidities relevant to CML TKI choice common

Comorbidities relevant to CML TKI choice common

Comorbid conditions that could affect the choice of tyrosine kinase inhibitor are common in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, finds an analysis of a US claims database. [More]
Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke, premature death

Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke, premature death

Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) in people aged 65 and over and treating it with anticoagulant medications could greatly reduce the risk of stroke and premature death, say cardiologists in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
CVIA journal launched at the opening ceremony of 26th GW-ICC meeting

CVIA journal launched at the opening ceremony of 26th GW-ICC meeting

Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA), a new journal affiliated with the Great Wall-International Congress of Cardiology, was introduced today at the opening ceremony of GWICC by Congress Chairman Prof. Changsheng Ma. [More]
Study: Blackouts, near drownings linked to sudden death risk

Study: Blackouts, near drownings linked to sudden death risk

The annual congress of the South African Heart Association is being held in Rustenburg from Oct. 25-28, 2015. Experts from the European Society of Cardiology will present a special programme. [More]
CV risk assessment essential for CML TKI trial design

CV risk assessment essential for CML TKI trial design

The risk and impact of cardiovascular adverse events in long-term users of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for chronic myeloid leukaemia is highlighted in a review published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
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