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An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Risk of motor vehicle accidents increased by 50% in ICD patients

Risk of motor vehicle accidents increased by 50% in ICD patients

The risk of traffic accidents is increased by 50% in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) compared to age and gender matched controls, according to a Danish nationwide registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
Alcohol-related hospitalisation linked to increased risk of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

Alcohol-related hospitalisation linked to increased risk of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

Alcohol related hospitalisation is associated with a doubled risk of ischaemic stroke risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Faris Al-Khalili, cardiologist, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy is equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, according to results from the observational PRAGUE-16 registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
New oral anticoagulants offer same stroke prevention, but cause less intracranial bleeding than warfarin

New oral anticoagulants offer same stroke prevention, but cause less intracranial bleeding than warfarin

The new oral anticoagulants provide the same stroke prevention as warfarin but cause less intracranial bleeding, reports an observational study in more than 43 000 patients presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Laila Staerk, a research fellow at Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark. [More]
Smartphones can be used to identify atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Smartphones can be used to identify atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Smartphones can be used to detect atrial fibrillation with existing hardware, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 A low-cost application (app) has been developed that uses the phone's own accelerometer and gyroscope to check for atrial fibrillation. [More]
First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are published online today in European Heart Journal and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC Website. [More]
New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications

New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications

The high levels of caffeine in energy drinks may lead to cardiac complications, suggests a case report in the July/August Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients

Research shows clear link between heart and the brain of LQTS patients

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center recently discovered a genetic link between Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), a rare cardiac rhythm disease, and an increased risk for seizures. [More]
Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

According to a recent Framingham Heart Study, people who experience the heart arrhythmia atrial fibrillation (AF), may also suffer from a smaller brain, specifically reduced frontal lobe volume. [More]
'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

Death is a bigger risk than stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation, particularly during the first 4 months after diagnosis, research shows. [More]
Omega-3 PUFA biomarkers demonstrate benefits for fatal CHD

Omega-3 PUFA biomarkers demonstrate benefits for fatal CHD

Regular consumption of seafood and plant-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could help lower the risk of fatal coronary heart disease, confirm findings from a pooled analysis of 19 studies. [More]
Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Lisinopril therapy significantly reduces incident conduction system disease, indicates a post-hoc analysis of ALLHAT data. [More]
Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems

Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems

Scientists and doctors in recent decades have made vast leaps in the treatment of cardiac problems - particularly with the development in recent years of so-called "cardiac patches," swaths of engineered heart tissue that can replace heart muscle damaged during a heart attack. [More]
Mathematical model helps investigate mechanisms involved in genesis of AF-related dementia

Mathematical model helps investigate mechanisms involved in genesis of AF-related dementia

Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, turns out to be a potential mechanism into the genesis of AF-related cognitive impairment/dementia. [More]
Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation

Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation

Black individuals with atrial fibrillation have markedly higher rates of stroke, heart failure, coronary heart disease and mortality than their White counterparts, data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study show. [More]
Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing and family screening help to provide explanations for sudden cardiac death in children and young adults, shows a population-based study. [More]
Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Stress is actually a bit of a buzzword. The initial definition was “the reaction to changes”, which is why you get stressed also when good things happen, hence the distinction between good stress, eustress, and bad stress, distress. [More]
NOACs match warfarin for atrial fibrillation

NOACs match warfarin for atrial fibrillation

Real-world study data from Denmark show that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants are effective alternatives to warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in a routine care setting. [More]
AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine report that more than 1 in 3 atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at intermediate to high risk for stroke are treated with aspirin alone, despite previous data showing this therapy to be inferior to blood thinners. [More]
Apixaban effective in polypharmacy setting

Apixaban effective in polypharmacy setting

The superiority of apixaban over warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is maintained in those taking multiple medications, shows further analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial. [More]
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