Arrhythmia News and Research RSS Feed - Arrhythmia News and Research

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia. A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be serious or even life threatening. When the heart rate is too slow, too fast, or irregular, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the body. Lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs.
Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Recent studies conclude that people with epilepsy have a 27-fold greater risk of sudden death than people without the disorder. However, many of these deaths could be prevented through greater identification of epilepsy as a cause of death, and in educating the public more effectively about the disease's life-threatening dangers. [More]
CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

CAP2 gene responsible for cardiac conduction disease in mice

The presence or absence of the CAP2 gene causes sudden cardiac death in mice, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In particular, the absence of the gene interrupts the animal's ability to send electrical signals to the heart to tell it to contract, a condition called cardiac conduction disease. [More]
Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Pacemakers have been around for a very long time, they're great devices, critical for many people who have slow heartbeats. While they're very effective, they have some issues. There are two main aspects relating to these issues. [More]
STSI launches home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensors to identify people with AFib

STSI launches home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensors to identify people with AFib

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a home-based clinical trial that uses wearable sensor technology to identify people with asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
Comorbidities relevant to CML TKI choice common

Comorbidities relevant to CML TKI choice common

Comorbid conditions that could affect the choice of tyrosine kinase inhibitor are common in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, finds an analysis of a US claims database. [More]
Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke, premature death

Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke, premature death

Screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) in people aged 65 and over and treating it with anticoagulant medications could greatly reduce the risk of stroke and premature death, say cardiologists in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
CVIA journal launched at the opening ceremony of 26th GW-ICC meeting

CVIA journal launched at the opening ceremony of 26th GW-ICC meeting

Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA), a new journal affiliated with the Great Wall-International Congress of Cardiology, was introduced today at the opening ceremony of GWICC by Congress Chairman Prof. Changsheng Ma. [More]
Study: Blackouts, near drownings linked to sudden death risk

Study: Blackouts, near drownings linked to sudden death risk

The annual congress of the South African Heart Association is being held in Rustenburg from Oct. 25-28, 2015. Experts from the European Society of Cardiology will present a special programme. [More]
CV risk assessment essential for CML TKI trial design

CV risk assessment essential for CML TKI trial design

The risk and impact of cardiovascular adverse events in long-term users of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for chronic myeloid leukaemia is highlighted in a review published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
The American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society Unite to Improve Cardiovascular Research, Care

The American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society Unite to Improve Cardiovascular Research, Care

The American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society today announced a collaboration designed to advance research and improve the delivery of care for people with an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
Researchers find way to predict occurrence of some cardiac arrhythmias

Researchers find way to predict occurrence of some cardiac arrhythmias

Researchers have discovered how to predict some cardiac arrhythmias several steps before they even occur. It's a finding that could lead to an improved cardiac device, with equipment designed to detect when arrhythmias are about to occur and then act to prevent them. [More]
Scripps becomes first health care provider in San Diego County to implant Evera MRI SureScan ICD System

Scripps becomes first health care provider in San Diego County to implant Evera MRI SureScan ICD System

Scripps Health is the first health care provider in San Diego County to use the only implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) device approved for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. [More]
Novo Nordisk announces FDA approval of Tresiba (insulin degludec injection) for diabetes treatment

Novo Nordisk announces FDA approval of Tresiba (insulin degludec injection) for diabetes treatment

Novo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes care, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new drug application for Tresiba (insulin degludec injection), a once-daily, long-acting basal insulin. Tresiba is indicated for use alone, or in combination with oral antidiabetic medicines or bolus insulin, and is approved for glycemic control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Tresiba provides a long duration of action beyond 42 hours. [More]
New genetic cause identified for congenital heart arrhythmia

New genetic cause identified for congenital heart arrhythmia

Scientists at The Ohio State University Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute have identified a new genetic cause for congenital heart arrhythmia. The results of their research are published online by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). [More]
Adolescents with bulimia nervosa recover faster when parents involved in treatment

Adolescents with bulimia nervosa recover faster when parents involved in treatment

Involving parents in the treatment of adolescents with bulimia nervosa is more effective than treating the patient individually, according to a study led by Daniel Le Grange, PhD, Benioff UCSF Professor in children's health in the departments of psychiatry and pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco, and James Lock, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Scientists identify new drug target to treat heart arrhythmias

Scientists identify new drug target to treat heart arrhythmias

Scientists at The Ohio State University Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute have identified a new target they hope will help make the next drug discovery for patients suffering from heart arrhythmias happen sooner. [More]

Resin contains substances that may cure epilepsy, say Linköping University researchers

Sticky resin from conifers contains substances that could relieve or cure epilepsy. Researchers at Linköping University have synthesized and tested 71 substances known as resin acids, of which twelve are prime candidates for new medicines. [More]
Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital's Richard G. Cartledge, MD, FACS, has begun performing ultra-minimally invasive left atrial appendage ligation for atrial fibrillation patients who are on anticoagulants such as Coumadin, Xarelto or Effient. Dr. Cartledge, who is Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Hospital, is one of a select group of surgeons nationally using this method, which involves making two microscopic incisions in order to seal off the left atrial appendage (LAA) in patients where anticoagulants are contraindicated or who refuse to be on such medications. [More]
GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

The first-ever two-year outcomes from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) showcased at ESC Congress 2015 expose that all-cause death was the most frequent major event in more than 17,000 newly diagnosed AF patients, far exceeding the rate of stroke or major bleeding. [More]
Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

A gene associated with sudden cardiac death in the general population has been identified using implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) monitoring in research presented for the first time at ESC Congress today. [More]
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