Bone News and Research RSS Feed - Bone News and Research

DNA imprinting defect may affect children diagnosed with osteosarcoma

DNA imprinting defect may affect children diagnosed with osteosarcoma

Children diagnosed with osteosarcoma may be impacted by a DNA imprinting defect also found in parents, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. DNA imprinting is a phenomenon in which just one of the two inherited genes is active while the other is present but inactive. [More]
CHLA researchers to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis could be used to predict risk for ACL injuries

CHLA researchers to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis could be used to predict risk for ACL injuries

Children's Hospital Los Angeles expert to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis can be used as a tool to predict risk for knee injuries. [More]
Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Results from STRIVE trial of enzalutamide versus bicalutamide in CRPC published in Journal of Clinical Oncology

Astellas US LLC, a United States (U.S.) subsidiary of Tokyo-based Astellas Pharma Inc., and Medivation, Inc. today announced that results from the STRIVE trial of enzalutamide compared to bicalutamide in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

One of the most common genetic disorders is a condition called neurofibromatosis, which causes brown spots on the skin and benign tumors on the brain, spinal cord and other parts of the nervous system. [More]
Parathyroid hormone may mediate antihypertensive fracture risk

Parathyroid hormone may mediate antihypertensive fracture risk

Parathyroid hormone levels may be elevated by use of some antihypertensive agents but reduced by others, analysis of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis suggests. [More]
Positive bosutinib response for elderly blast phase CML patient

Positive bosutinib response for elderly blast phase CML patient

A case study suggests that the third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib may be considered as induction therapy for blast phase chronic myeloid leukaemia in older patients. [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]
UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

As a result of research performed by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a drug to treat the deleterious effects of radiation exposure following a nuclear incident. The drug, Neulasta, is one of a very small number that have been approved for the treatment of acute radiation injury. [More]
Novel technique helps identify diabetic patients at risk of bone fractures

Novel technique helps identify diabetic patients at risk of bone fractures

A Southampton study using high resolution imaging to create a "virtual bone biopsy" has shed new light on why people with type 2 diabetes are at risk of bone fractures. [More]
IMP, WEHI scientists successfully characterize central regulator of plasma cell function

IMP, WEHI scientists successfully characterize central regulator of plasma cell function

Plasma cells play a key role in our immune system. Now scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, Austria, and at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) in Melbourne, Australia, succeeded in characterizing a central regulator of plasma cell function. [More]

New clinical imaging method may enable doctors to tackle lung infections

A new clinical imaging method developed in collaboration with a University of Exeter academic may enable doctors to tackle one of the main killers of patients with weakened immune systems sooner and more effectively. [More]
UConn-led researchers identify specific gene linked to Hajdu-Cheney syndrome

UConn-led researchers identify specific gene linked to Hajdu-Cheney syndrome

Fragile bones are usually an old person's affliction, but sometimes children are born with them. Now, a team of researchers led by UConn professor Ernesto Canalis has shown in mice that a specific gene can cause the disease, called Hajdu-Cheney syndrome. Overabundant bone-absorbing cells may be causing the disorder's characteristic bone loss, and the researchers hope to find a potential treatment. [More]
New study shows bone marrow lesions could help identify rapidly progressing osteoarthritis

New study shows bone marrow lesions could help identify rapidly progressing osteoarthritis

A new study from the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, shows lesions, which can best be seen on MRI scans, could help identify individuals who are more likely to suffer from more rapidly progressing osteoarthritis. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Cosentyx (secukinumab) for two new indications - the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). [More]
IQWiG finds no added benefit for pomalidomide drug in multiple myeloma

IQWiG finds no added benefit for pomalidomide drug in multiple myeloma

Pomalidomide (trade name: Imnovid) has been approved since 2013 for the treatment of multiple myeloma that has returned and is difficult to treat. The drug is an option for adults who have received two or more prior treatment regimens, including treatment with the drugs lenalidomide and bortezomib, and in whom the last treatment had no sufficient effect. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
Mechanical properties of bone revealed through micro-indentation testing

Mechanical properties of bone revealed through micro-indentation testing

Unravelling the mechanical properties of bone with micro-indentation testing has significance in both health and disease. At the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Dr. Björn Busse and his research group have advanced their micro-indentation testing technique using an Olympus industrial inspection digital light microscope, as an alternative to electron microscopy. The cutting edge research is described in a new application note from Olympus, available online. [More]
Increasing levels of FGF21 hormone protects against loss of immune function in the elderly

Increasing levels of FGF21 hormone protects against loss of immune function in the elderly

A hormone that extends lifespan in mice by 40% is produced by specialized cells in the thymus gland, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. The team also found that increasing the levels of this hormone, called FGF21, protects against the loss of immune function that comes with age. [More]

Bio2 Technologies receives 510(k) clearance from FDA for Fusion Implant system

Bio2 Technologies, Inc. announced today that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Fusion Implant system for interphalangeal fusion, fracture repair and osteotomies of the toes, fingers and other small bones in the presence of appropriate immobilization. [More]
DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

New research by UC San Francisco stem cell biologists has revealed that a DNA-binding protein called Foxd3 acts like a genetic traffic signal, holding that ball of undifferentiated cells in a state of readiness for its great transformation in the third week of development. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement