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Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos. [More]
UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

UNMC researcher receives $3.3 million grant to study rare diseases that affect children

University of Nebraska Medical Center researcher, William Rizzo, M.D., has received a five-year, $3.3 million grant to study 10 rare diseases that affect children beginning in infancy or early childhood and throughout their life. [More]
IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

New survey findings released by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) for World Osteoporosis Day show that on average, 93 percent of nearly 1,200 adults surveyed are unaware how common osteoporotic fractures are in men. [More]
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
New preclinical imaging product line launched by MILabs at the 2014 Annual European Association of Nuclear Medicine Meeting

New preclinical imaging product line launched by MILabs at the 2014 Annual European Association of Nuclear Medicine Meeting

MILabs BV has launched a complete new preclinical product line at the 2014 Annual European Association of Nuclear Medicine Meeting in Gothenburg, Sweden, October 18-22 (www.eanm.org). It consists of the new 4-series comprising U-SPECT4, U-SPECT4CT, VECTor4 and VECTor4CT incorporating significant improvements over the former PLUS-series. The 4-series carries even further the tradition of MILabs to deliver the best SPECT and PET image resolution available in the market. [More]
The Female Athlete Triad: A medical condition in active girls and women

The Female Athlete Triad: A medical condition in active girls and women

Sophie is a 15 year old cross country runner who has a history of a foot stress fracture and shin splints. Often she does not eat prior to her workouts. [More]

Transcutaneous oximetry test may help predict surgical wound-healing complications

As many as 35 percent of patients who undergo surgery to remove soft tissue sarcomas experience wound-healing complications, due to radiation they receive before surgery. [More]
Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Two studies recently published in Cell Transplantation reveal that cell transplantation may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), a major cause of disability and paralysis with no current restorative therapies. [More]
Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center, a trusted NYC nursing home, urges senior citizens and their families to learn the basics of proper nutrition for senior citizens. The nursing facility's staff has created a short list of key tips for families and seniors looking to improve their mental and physical health through dietary changes. [More]
Researchers reveal gene variants that delay fracture healing

Researchers reveal gene variants that delay fracture healing

Slow-healing or non-healing bone fractures in otherwise healthy people may be caused by gene variants that are common in the population, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer. [More]
Imperial researchers plan to test DTP3 drug in multiple myeloma patients

Imperial researchers plan to test DTP3 drug in multiple myeloma patients

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year. [More]
C3BS receives authorization to begin CHART-1 European Phase III trial for C-Cure in Switzerland

C3BS receives authorization to begin CHART-1 European Phase III trial for C-Cure in Switzerland

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of regenerative, protective and reconstructive therapies, announces today it has received authorization from Swissmedic, the Swiss agency for the authorisation and supervision of therapeutic products, to begin its Congestive Heart failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) European Phase III trial for C-Cure in Switzerland. [More]
Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density does not contribute to musculoskeletal pain, researchers report in findings that shed light on the controversy over whether osteoporosis is a painless disease. [More]

BioHorizons launches MinerOss X for dental implant site development procedures

BioHorizons, an oral reconstructive device company, today announced the launch of MinerOss X, a family of xenograft products for dental implant site development procedures. The MinerOss X family includes cancellous or cortical particulate, a moldable collagen block, and a cancellous particulate pre-loaded into a delivery syringe to assist with optimal placement. [More]
Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014-. [More]
InSightec to share new insights at FUS symposium

InSightec to share new insights at FUS symposium

InSightec, world leader in MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) will be on site at the Focused Ultrasound International Symposium (FUS) to share key insights gained in the past two years of using its non-invasive MRgFUS solution for treating a variety of neurosurgical, oncological and gynecological indications. [More]
New findings link obesity and dietary factors to late-life dementias

New findings link obesity and dietary factors to late-life dementias

Difficulties learning, remembering, and concentrating. An inability to resist environmental temptations to eat. A lifetime of progressive deterioration in the brain. [More]
Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

Scientists say fundamental theory about how thymus educates immune police appears to be wrong

A fundamental theory about how our thymus educates our immune police appears to be wrong, scientists say. [More]