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Right dose of CAR T cells and lymphodepletion can achieve good response rates for NHL patients

Right dose of CAR T cells and lymphodepletion can achieve good response rates for NHL patients

In a paper published today in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center shared data from an early-phase study of patients with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who received JCAR014, a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell treatment, and chemotherapy. [More]
UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

A study led by University of Cincinnati lipid metabolism researchers lends additional insight into how bacteria in the gut, or lack thereof, influences intestinal mast cells (MMC) activation and perhaps fat absorption. [More]
Stem cells may be responsible for vascular calcification in patients with kidney disease

Stem cells may be responsible for vascular calcification in patients with kidney disease

Scientists have implicated a type of stem cell in the calcification of blood vessels that is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. [More]
Interactions between rare and common genetic variants may contribute to craniosynostosis

Interactions between rare and common genetic variants may contribute to craniosynostosis

During the first year of life, the human brain doubles in size, and continues growing through adolescence. [More]
Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Research conducted by Griffith University and Melbourne-based company Paradigm Biopharmaceuticals Limited has uncovered a potential new therapeutic treatment for the global battle against mosquito-borne alphavirus infections, including the debilitating Ross River Virus (RRV) and Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV). [More]
Prevention programs can decrease risk of ankle injuries in soccer players

Prevention programs can decrease risk of ankle injuries in soccer players

Prevention programs are effective at reducing the risk of ankle injuries by 40 percent in soccer players, according to a new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
Study finds cord blood transplant recipients appear to have better outcomes against leukemia

Study finds cord blood transplant recipients appear to have better outcomes against leukemia

Umbilical cord blood transplants may have advantages beyond offering an alternative stem cell source for leukemia patients without a traditional donor match, according to a study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Researchers discover risk factors that contribute to fracture nonunion in adults

Researchers discover risk factors that contribute to fracture nonunion in adults

Dr. Robert Zura, the Robert D'Ambrosia Professor and Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of a research team that identified risk factors which may help orthopaedic surgeons better predict a serious complication of bone fractures. [More]
School-based exercises may benefit bone mass, strength in growing children

School-based exercises may benefit bone mass, strength in growing children

Moderate to high impact sports such as gymnastics, basketball, or football have been shown to benefit bone mass, structure and strength - with benefits particularly apparent during pre-and early adolescence. [More]
Beta-blockers can help treat bone loss caused by antidepressants in mice

Beta-blockers can help treat bone loss caused by antidepressants in mice

The antidepressant fluoxetine causes bone loss by instructing the brain to send out signals that increase bone breakdown, but a beta-blocker can intercept the signals, a new study in mice has found. [More]
New PET scan can detect prostate cancer earlier than MRIs and CT scans

New PET scan can detect prostate cancer earlier than MRIs and CT scans

Loyola Medicine is the first center in the Midwest to offer the first effective PET/CT scan for prostate cancer patients. [More]
Fungal communities in chronic wounds can be linked to poor outcomes and slow healing

Fungal communities in chronic wounds can be linked to poor outcomes and slow healing

Researchers in Pennsylvania and Iowa have discovered that fungal communities found in chronic wounds can form mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms and can be associated with poor outcomes and longer healing times. [More]
New study details design and validation of accurate screening test for detecting deadly HAIs

New study details design and validation of accurate screening test for detecting deadly HAIs

A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute details the design and validation of a low-cost, rapid and highly accurate screening tool -- known as KlebSeq -- for potentially deadly healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), such as Klebsiella pneumoniae. [More]
JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin

JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin

Osteoporosis particularly affects elderly women: the bone's structure weakens and the risk of suffering fractures rises. [More]
Graphene flakes welded together to form 3-D solids may be suitable for bone implants

Graphene flakes welded together to form 3-D solids may be suitable for bone implants

Flakes of graphene welded together into solid materials may be suitable for bone implants, according to a study led by Rice University scientists. [More]
BetterYou’s oral vitamin D sprays win gold and bronze at Best Baby and Toddler Gear Awards by Mummii

BetterYou’s oral vitamin D sprays win gold and bronze at Best Baby and Toddler Gear Awards by Mummii

An innovative way of boosting the vitamin D levels of expectant mums and infants has been honoured by one of the parenting industries most prestigious award schemes. [More]
Approved dengue vaccine may increase infection in certain settings, research suggests

Approved dengue vaccine may increase infection in certain settings, research suggests

The only approved vaccine for dengue may actually increase the incidence of dengue infections requiring hospitalization rather than preventing the disease if health officials aren't careful about where they vaccinate, new public health research published Sept. 2 in Science suggests. [More]
Blood cancer treatment linked to distinct increase in molecular age of immune cells

Blood cancer treatment linked to distinct increase in molecular age of immune cells

Certain cancer treatments are known to take a toll on patients, causing side effects like fatigue, nausea and hair loss. Now, scientists are investigating whether some treatments can cause another long-term side effect: premature aging of important disease-fighting cells. [More]
Advances in nuclear medicine production: an interview with Jayne Senior

Advances in nuclear medicine production: an interview with Jayne Senior

In my view, one of the greatest changes in recent history that has come about in nuclear medicine production is Australia’s full adoption of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) technologies – in both the fuel and the target plates. [More]
Giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

Giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

New research from New Zealand's University of Otago has found that giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements may be a possible way to improve their babies' vitamin D status. [More]
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