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UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

The University of Texas System Board of Regents has approved establishment of the UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center at Fort Worth, made possible by an extraordinary $25 million commitment from W.A. "Tex" Moncrief Jr. The Center is UT Southwestern's first named campus outside of Dallas. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike. [More]
Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Patients with scoliosis who undergo surgery may be less likely to develop an infection or other complications after the procedure when a novel wound closure technique pioneered at NYU Langone Medical Center is utilized, according to new research. [More]
Researchers identify strategy to prevent adenoviruses from multiplying and causing sickness in humans

Researchers identify strategy to prevent adenoviruses from multiplying and causing sickness in humans

Using an animal model they developed, Saint Louis University and Utah State university researchers have identified a strategy that could keep a common group of viruses called adenoviruses from replicating and causing sickness in humans. [More]
NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

New York Blood Center today announced a new collaboration with the University of California, Davis, Health System to manufacture specialized lines of stem cells as potential therapies for repair and regeneration of retina, kidney, lung and liver tissue, as well as for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. [More]
STA inks license and commercialisation agreement with PharmaMar for APLIDIN (plitidepsin)

STA inks license and commercialisation agreement with PharmaMar for APLIDIN (plitidepsin)

Australian biopharmaceutical company Specialised Therapeutics Australia has struck an exclusive license and commercialisation agreement with European pharmaceutical partner company PharmaMar to market and distribute the novel oncology drug APLIDIN (plitidepsin) in Australia and New Zealand. [More]
IUPUI researcher receives NIH grant to study role of collagen in bone fracture resistance

IUPUI researcher receives NIH grant to study role of collagen in bone fracture resistance

A biomedical engineer researcher at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has received a $419,000 National Institutes of Health grant to uncover why mechanical loading of bones increases their resistance to fractures. [More]
GMP protein can improve gastrointestinal health by protecting digestive system from pathogens

GMP protein can improve gastrointestinal health by protecting digestive system from pathogens

The protein glycomacropeptide (GMP) is derived from whey, the liquid by-product of the cheese-making process. GMP contains low amounts of the amino acid phenylalanine. Individuals who suffer from phenylketonuria—a metabolic disorder that causes cognitive impairment when phenylalanine level is too high—can use GMP as an alternative protein source. GMP supplementation has also been observed to improve gastrointestinal health by protecting the digestive system from pathogens and by having an anti-inflammatory effect. [More]
Scientists develop technique to rejuvenate cells from older osteoarthritis patients

Scientists develop technique to rejuvenate cells from older osteoarthritis patients

A research team at York has adapted the astonishing capacity of animals such as newts to regenerate lost tissues and organs caused when they have a limb severed. [More]
Energy-burning 'good' fat helps reduce weight gain, lower blood glucose levels in mice

Energy-burning 'good' fat helps reduce weight gain, lower blood glucose levels in mice

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a novel way to engineer the growth and expansion of energy-burning "good" fat, and then found that this fat helped reduce weight gain and lower blood glucose levels in mice. [More]
New study uses donor sample to evaluate how self-identification measures intersect with genetics

New study uses donor sample to evaluate how self-identification measures intersect with genetics

For years, medicine has relied on self-reported race/ethnicity as the basis of an array of decisions, from risk for disease to matching organ donors. Now, a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that when that information matters most - in connecting bone marrow donors to patients - the format of the questions may determine how well the answers actually correspond to their genes. [More]
Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells derived from amniotic membranes can benefit eye diseases

Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells derived from amniotic membranes can benefit eye diseases

A team of researchers in South Korea has successfully transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from human amniotic membranes of the placenta (AMSCs) into laboratory mice modeled with oxygen-induced retinopathy (a murine model used to mimic eye disease). [More]
MCRI announces winners of cancer crowdsourcing initiative

MCRI announces winners of cancer crowdsourcing initiative

The Myeloma Crowd Research Initiative (MCRI), an unprecedented collaboration of cancer researchers and patient advocates, today announced the two winners of its first-ever crowdsourcing and patient-led initiative to fund research in high-risk multiple myeloma, a rare malignancy of plasma cells. [More]

Study shows patients with greater medical needs view doctors as emotionless humans

When a patient is in urgent need of a doctor for illness or injury, expecting that doctor to help is natural. But a new study, published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, finds that the greater patients' need for medical care, the more likely patients will view their doctors as "empty vessels," devoid of emotions or personal lives of their own; at the same time, those patients expect their physicians to be able to contain the patients' emotions and experiences. [More]
NIH funds multicenter study to evaluate impact of medical treatment in transgender youth

NIH funds multicenter study to evaluate impact of medical treatment in transgender youth

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $5.7M for a five-year, multicenter study, which will be the first in the U.S. to evaluate the long-term outcomes of medical treatment for transgender youth. [More]
Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the European Commission (EC) has granted Marketing Authorisation for Unituxin (dinutuximab) for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients aged 12 months to 17 years, who have previously received induction chemotherapy and achieved at least a partial response, followed by myeloablative therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). [More]
Researchers reveal how migrating tumour cells produce protein that helps set up home in bones

Researchers reveal how migrating tumour cells produce protein that helps set up home in bones

Cancer cells that migrate to the bone acquire a unique trait: They start to express the protein cathepsin K. Researchers from the University of Freiburg and the BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies have now solved why it is important for the migrating cells to produce this protein. [More]
Combination of chemotherapy and immune-blocking drug could prevent cancer recurrence

Combination of chemotherapy and immune-blocking drug could prevent cancer recurrence

Giving patients a drug that blocks part of the immune system from going into overdrive might help prevent cancer coming back in some people, according to research published today in Cancer Research. [More]
New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

New study explains why statins are more beneficial than others in some cases

Statins' success in reducing atherosclerosis-related events has elevated the medications to wonder-drug status, with some researchers advocating for their wider use as a preemptive therapy for cardiovascular disease. [More]
New MRI contrast agent detects tiny breast cancer tumors, micrometastases

New MRI contrast agent detects tiny breast cancer tumors, micrometastases

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that detects much smaller aggressive breast cancer tumors and micrometastases than current agents can identify. [More]
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