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Adaptive Biotechnologies demonstrates use of high-throughput sequencing platform for MRD

Adaptive Biotechnologies demonstrates use of high-throughput sequencing platform for MRD

Adaptive Biotechnologies, the leader in combining next-generation sequencing (NGS) and expert bioinformatics to profile T- and B-cell receptors of the adaptive immune system, and collaborators will be presenting five studies demonstrating how Adaptive’s high-throughput sequencing platform enables diagnosis, detection and assessment of prognosis in hematological malignances and has increased sensitivity over flow cytometry. [More]
Researchers develop new technique for coating polymer implants with bioactive film

Researchers develop new technique for coating polymer implants with bioactive film

Researchers have developed a technique for coating polymer implants with a bioactive film that significantly increases bonding between the implant and surrounding bone in an animal model. [More]
Salvage alloSCT remains option for progressing CML patients

Salvage alloSCT remains option for progressing CML patients

Research demonstrates the continuing role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation as a salvage option for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia who progress to accelerated phase or blast crisis after tyrosine kinase inhibitor failure. [More]
Long-term dasatinib findings support first-line use in CML

Long-term dasatinib findings support first-line use in CML

Final DASISION study findings confirm dasatinib to be an effective, long-term treatment for patients with a new diagnosis of chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Women live longer than men. This simple statement holds a tantalizing riddle that Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham explore in a perspective piece published in Cell Metabolism on June 14. [More]
New, portable molecular imaging system combines optical imaging and scintigraphy

New, portable molecular imaging system combines optical imaging and scintigraphy

Bigger isn't always better, especially when it comes to a new and surprisingly portable molecular imaging system that combines optical imaging at the surface level and scintigraphy, which captures the physiological function of what lies beneath, announced developers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

Although brains—even adult brains—are far more malleable than we used to think, they are eventually subject to age-related illnesses, like dementia, and loss of cognitive function. [More]
Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood

Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood

Exercise, particularly high-impact activity, builds stronger bones in children, even for those who carry genetic variants that predispose them to bone weakness, according to new research. [More]
Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

To protect human health, Endocrine Society members called on the European Commission to adopt science-based policies for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals in an opinion piece published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. [More]
Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

New research published online today in Blood Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), challenges the generally held belief that individuals with HIV and aggressive lymphoma are not candidates for standard treatment. [More]
New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

New stem cell treatment may halt clinical relapses, development of new brain lesions in patients MS

A new use of chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) has fully halted clinical relapses and development of new brain lesions in 23 of 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for a prolonged period without the need for ongoing medication, according to a new phase 2 clinical trial, published in The Lancet. [More]
PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays key role in prostate tumor growth and progression

PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays key role in prostate tumor growth and progression

The research article - Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression: Insight to Therapy, by Dr Claudio Festuccia and published in Clinical Cancer Drugs, volume 3, issue 1 - discusses experimental and clinical data on the pharmacological inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathways. [More]
Defects in cerebrospinal fluid flow may contribute to scoliosis during adolescence

Defects in cerebrospinal fluid flow may contribute to scoliosis during adolescence

A new study in zebrafish suggests that irregular fluid flow through the spinal column brought on by gene mutations is linked to a type of scoliosis that can affect humans during adolescence. [More]
About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

As the promise of using regenerative stem cell therapies draws closer, a consortium of biomedical scientists reports about 30 percent of induced pluripotent stem cells they analyzed from 10 research institutions were genetically unstable and not safe for clinical use. [More]
Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

A group of researchers from the University of Louisville, Japan and Austria is the first to identify a protein, AF1q, associated with multiple myeloma and a condition that occurs in approximately one-fourth of very aggressive multiple myeloma, extramedullary disease or EMD. [More]
Lack of signaling protein CXCR4 may halt cancer development

Lack of signaling protein CXCR4 may halt cancer development

Zebrafish-human communication shows that cancer cells lacking a signaling protein are less able to develop aggressive metastatic properties. [More]
Drug candidate delivered by plant-virus-based carrier shows promise for triple-negative breast cancer

Drug candidate delivered by plant-virus-based carrier shows promise for triple-negative breast cancer

In a pair of firsts, researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have shown that the drug candidate phenanthriplatin can be more effective than an approved drug in vivo, and that a plant-virus-based carrier successfully delivers a drug in vivo. [More]
Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Adding to previous evidence, a study based on a statewide cancer database shows no increase in cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with the bone-promoting growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP). The study appears in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

A recent pilot study reported in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that sodium fluoride (Na-F-18) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (NaF-PET/CT) accurately detects bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and follow-up scans over time correlate clearly with clinical outcomes and patient survival. [More]
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