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Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
Alternative limb-lengthening technique makes recovery process less cumbersome

Alternative limb-lengthening technique makes recovery process less cumbersome

A highly specialized procedure that lengthens bones can prevent the need for amputations in selected patients who have suffered severe fractures. [More]
UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

Zach feels "pretty good." Sam wants to be "done with shots!" And Tyler finds it helps to "just keep thinking that at least I'm getting out of school." They are normal boys who had normal lives until cancer came into the picture. All have faced the disease for two years or more, with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. All were diagnosed with various malignant solid tumors, went into remission and then relapsed. [More]
AESKU.DIAGNOSTICS offers new early prognostic marker for RA

AESKU.DIAGNOSTICS offers new early prognostic marker for RA

Activity and outcome scores like DAS, DAS28, SDAI or CDAI, Larsen Score, etc. are commonly used but are time consuming and not practical in the early phase of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling levels of iron in the body also play an important role in combatting infection, according to a study published today in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

Cannabis -- marijuana, hashish -- was used as a go-to medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. But the therapeutic use of marijuana was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to a growing awareness of the dangers of addiction. The significant medical benefits of marijuana in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's, cancer, and multiple sclerosis have only recently been reinvestigated. [More]
INSIGHTEC announces additional positive coverage policies for ExAblate MRgFUS procedure for bone metastases

INSIGHTEC announces additional positive coverage policies for ExAblate MRgFUS procedure for bone metastases

INSIGHTEC announced today that Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi, Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield, Blue Cross of Idaho and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona have published an updated coverage policy regarding INSIGHTEC's ExAblate MRgFUS (Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound) procedure which provides benefits for bone metastases patients. The ExAblate treatment is FDA-approved for patients suffering from pain associated with bone metastases. [More]
Leading scientists to meet in Southampton to discuss new technologies to create living tissues

Leading scientists to meet in Southampton to discuss new technologies to create living tissues

Leading scientists from the UK and around the world will meet at the University of Southampton next week (20 and 21 July) to discuss new technologies to create new, living tissues in the lab and to help our bodies regenerate themselves. [More]
Study compares outcomes for in-person and in-home telerehabilitation following TKR surgery

Study compares outcomes for in-person and in-home telerehabilitation following TKR surgery

Patients who received rehabilitation instructions via video teleconference, or "telerehabilitation," following total knee replacement (TKR) surgery had comparable outcomes to patients who received in-person physical therapy, according to a study appearing in the July 15 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. [More]
Study stresses importance of investigating telomeres to improve diagnoses, develop treatments for many diseases

Study stresses importance of investigating telomeres to improve diagnoses, develop treatments for many diseases

Studying telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of chromosomes, has become a key issue in biology. In recent years, not only has their relation to ageing been confirmed; defective telomeres seem to be linked to more and more illnesses, including many types of cancer. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
Brett Lee named Cochlear's first Global Hearing Ambassador

Brett Lee named Cochlear's first Global Hearing Ambassador

Australian cricket great, Brett Lee, was today announced as Cochlear's first Global Hearing Ambassador. As one of the world's fastest bowlers, who has smashed multiple cricket records, Brett's new target is 360 million people - and raising awareness about hearing loss. [More]
Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Chunying Li, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has secured his first R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role and mechanism of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in regulating new blood vessel formation, the so-called angiogenesis. [More]
IU researcher plays role in recent FDA approval of Neupogen drug to treat people exposed to radiation

IU researcher plays role in recent FDA approval of Neupogen drug to treat people exposed to radiation

An Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center researcher played a role in the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of a drug to treat people exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. [More]
Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that produces autoantibodies and subsequent immune reactions that can lead to a variety of symptoms, including inflammation of the kidneys, or nephritis. When researchers transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow into mice modeled with SLE, they found that inflammation was reduced and nephritis "attenuated." [More]
Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Collectively, such diseases of the airways as emphysema, bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis are the second leading cause of death worldwide. More than 35 million Americans alone suffer from chronic respiratory disease. Weizmann Institute scientists have now proposed a new direction that could, in the future, lead to the development of a method for alleviating some of their suffering. [More]
Clinical data on TomoTherapy System presented at AAPM 2015

Clinical data on TomoTherapy System presented at AAPM 2015

Accuray Incorporated announced today that studies on the clinical use of the TomoTherapy System continue to demonstrate its mainstream use and the benefits of its gold-standard treatment planning and delivery capabilities. More than 30 studies were presented during poster or oral sessions at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine held in Anaheim, California July 12 – July 16, 2015. [More]
Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice in countries with low solar intensity like Canada might in fact be harmful to your health, says the co-author of a new study on sunlight and vitamin D. [More]
Single molecule appears to be central regulator driving cancer metastasis

Single molecule appears to be central regulator driving cancer metastasis

Cancer is a disease of cell growth, but most tumors only become lethal once they metastasize or spread from their first location to sites throughout the body. For the first time, researchers at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia report a single molecule that appears to be the central regulator driving metastasis in prostate cancer. [More]
Postmenopausal women with kidney, bladder stones not at increased risk for osteoporosis

Postmenopausal women with kidney, bladder stones not at increased risk for osteoporosis

Postmenopausal women with kidney or bladder stones are not at increased risk for osteoporosis, but they do have about a 15 percent increased risk of another painful stone, physician-scientists report. [More]
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