Bone Marrow News and Research RSS Feed - Bone Marrow News and Research

Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
Scientists publish new important clues about marrow fat

Scientists publish new important clues about marrow fat

While most of us worry about the fat cells building up on the fleshy parts of our bodies, scientists have started to pay serious attention to another kind of fat cell deep inside our bones, in what's called the marrow. [More]
Investigational topical drug shows promise in patients with early stage cutaneous T cell lymphoma

Investigational topical drug shows promise in patients with early stage cutaneous T cell lymphoma

Results of a phase one trial show that an investigational topical drug, resiquimod gel, causes regression of both treated and untreated tumor lesions and may completely remove cancerous cells from both sites in patients with early stage cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) - a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects the skin. [More]
Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Adults who are worried or terrified sometimes curl up into a fetal position. Likewise, adult cells that are injured, including genetic injury leading to cancer, initiate a process that was present during embryonic development. [More]
Engineered protein shown effective in patients with severe von Willebrand disease

Engineered protein shown effective in patients with severe von Willebrand disease

The first protein engineered to help control bleeding episodes in patients with severe von Willebrand disease (vW disease) has been shown to be safe and effective, according to results of a Phase III trial. [More]
UVA Stem Cell Transplant Program receives FACT accreditation for autologous and allogeneic transplants

UVA Stem Cell Transplant Program receives FACT accreditation for autologous and allogeneic transplants

The Stem Cell Transplant Program at the University of Virginia Cancer Center has received international accreditation for its use of stem cells and bone marrow to treat patients with blood cancers. [More]
Researchers establish safety, dosing of new drug for treating blood cancers

Researchers establish safety, dosing of new drug for treating blood cancers

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have established the safety and dosing of a new drug for treating blood cancers. The findings are published online July 27 in The Lancet Haematology. [More]
Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

The silkworm, which produces the essential ingredient for fine silk fabric, also plays a critical role in a new process designed to provide relief for millions of individuals with dry mouth, a devastating oral and systemic health issue. [More]
Stem cell transplantation improves outcomes in children with rare form of chronic blood cancer

Stem cell transplantation improves outcomes in children with rare form of chronic blood cancer

Researchers in the Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood & Marrow Transplantation at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown greatly improved outcomes in using stem cell transplantation to treat patients with a serious but very rare form of chronic blood cancer called juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). [More]
Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

As part of a multi-institutional effort, researchers with Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that multiple myeloma patients with a genetic variation in the gene FOPNL die on average 1-3 years sooner than patients without it. [More]
New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor (TCR) therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT). [More]
Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling iron levels in the body also fight against infection

Proteins responsible for controlling levels of iron in the body also play an important role in combatting infection, according to a study published today in Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Study stresses importance of investigating telomeres to improve diagnoses, develop treatments for many diseases

Study stresses importance of investigating telomeres to improve diagnoses, develop treatments for many diseases

Studying telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of chromosomes, has become a key issue in biology. In recent years, not only has their relation to ageing been confirmed; defective telomeres seem to be linked to more and more illnesses, including many types of cancer. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Chunying Li, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has secured his first R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role and mechanism of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in regulating new blood vessel formation, the so-called angiogenesis. [More]
IU researcher plays role in recent FDA approval of Neupogen drug to treat people exposed to radiation

IU researcher plays role in recent FDA approval of Neupogen drug to treat people exposed to radiation

An Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center researcher played a role in the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of a drug to treat people exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. [More]
Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that produces autoantibodies and subsequent immune reactions that can lead to a variety of symptoms, including inflammation of the kidneys, or nephritis. When researchers transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow into mice modeled with SLE, they found that inflammation was reduced and nephritis "attenuated." [More]
Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Collectively, such diseases of the airways as emphysema, bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis are the second leading cause of death worldwide. More than 35 million Americans alone suffer from chronic respiratory disease. Weizmann Institute scientists have now proposed a new direction that could, in the future, lead to the development of a method for alleviating some of their suffering. [More]
Researchers identify protein responsible for preserving antibody-producing cells that lead to long-term immunity

Researchers identify protein responsible for preserving antibody-producing cells that lead to long-term immunity

Melbourne researchers have identified a protein responsible for preserving the antibody-producing cells that lead to long-term immunity after infection or vaccination. [More]
Acceleration of cell cycle transition kinetic can make human blood stem cells more powerful

Acceleration of cell cycle transition kinetic can make human blood stem cells more powerful

For the first time, the research group of Prof. Claudia Waskow at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine at Dresden Technical University is now describing a new mechanism in which the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle has a dramatic impact on the fitness of human blood stem cells. [More]
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