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Bone Marrow is the soft, sponge-like tissue in the center of most bones. It produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.
Obesity in African-American men increases prostate cancer risk

Obesity in African-American men increases prostate cancer risk

Obesity has a profoundly different effect on prostate cancer risk in African-American as compared to non-Hispanic white men. Obesity in black men substantially increases the risk of low- and high-grade prostate cancer, while obesity in white men moderately reduces the risk of low-grade cancer and only slightly increases the risk of high-grade cancer, according to the first large, prospective study to examine how race and obesity jointly affect prostate cancer risk. [More]
MSK begins CAR T cell clinical trial for children with relapsed or treatment-resistant ALL

MSK begins CAR T cell clinical trial for children with relapsed or treatment-resistant ALL

Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center are pioneering a new groundbreaking clinical trial for children and young adults with relapsed or treatment-resistant acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) by using one of the most promising methods of cancer treatment today, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. [More]
Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

The most recent results from a clinical trial show that ibrutinib, a newly approved drug for Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, continued to control the rare blood cancer, with 95 percent of patients surviving for two years, report investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. [More]
Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Damage to heart muscle from insufficient blood supply during cardiac arrest and reperfusion injury after blood flow is restored can be reduced by nearly 90 percent if selenide, a form of the essential nutrient selenium, is administered intravenously in the wake of the attack, according to a new preclinical study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Amniotic stem cells promote growth of functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels

Amniotic stem cells promote growth of functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels

Rice University and Texas Children's Hospital scientists are using stem cells from amniotic fluid to promote the growth of robust, functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels. [More]
Pharmacyclics announces positive results from IMBRUVICA Phase II study in WM patients

Pharmacyclics announces positive results from IMBRUVICA Phase II study in WM patients

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced longer-term data from a Phase II investigator-initiated study showing Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) patients treated with IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) experienced sustained disease control with an overall response rate (ORR) of 91% after a median of 19.1 months of treatment and a 2-year overall survival (OS) rate of 95%. [More]
Scientists discover molecular switch that ‘turns off’ HCMV

Scientists discover molecular switch that ‘turns off’ HCMV

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an extremely common virus, which as other members of the herpes virus family causes life-long infections in humans. Most individuals are exposed to HCMV during childhood, yet symptoms can be easily fought off by a healthy immune system. [More]
Clinical trial uses personalized cellular therapy to treat GVHD complication of bone marrow transplant

Clinical trial uses personalized cellular therapy to treat GVHD complication of bone marrow transplant

An innovative clinical trial using the science of "personalized" cellular therapy has begun enrolling children and adults suffering from graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication of bone marrow transplantation in which donor immune lymphocytes attack the organs of the bone marrow transplant recipient. [More]
Low doses of imatinib drug can push immune system to combat bacterial infections

Low doses of imatinib drug can push immune system to combat bacterial infections

Low doses of the anti-cancer drug imatinib can spur the bone marrow to produce more innate immune cells to fight against bacterial infections, Emory researchers have found. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Lung diseases like emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis are common among people with malfunctioning telomeres, the “caps” or ends of chromosomes. Now, researchers from Johns Hopkins say they have discovered what goes wrong and why. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Johns Hopkins researchers find link between premature aging of telomere and lung diseases

Lung diseases like emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis are common among people with malfunctioning telomeres, the “caps” or ends of chromosomes. Now, researchers from Johns Hopkins say they have discovered what goes wrong and why. [More]
Genetic markers may predict tumor samples that respond to treatment

Genetic markers may predict tumor samples that respond to treatment

Patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia have limited treatment options, and those that exist are effective only in fewer than half of patients. Now, a new study identifies a panel of genetic markers that predicted which tumor samples would likely respond to treatment. [More]
Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) of Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection for the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
apceth begins Agenmestencel-T Phase II clinical trial in gastrointestinal cancer patients

apceth begins Agenmestencel-T Phase II clinical trial in gastrointestinal cancer patients

apceth, a global leader in engineered cell therapies, today announced the successful completion of the Phase I and initiation of the Phase II part of its ongoing monocentric Phase I/II clinical trial TREAT-ME 1 with the engineered cell therapeutic product Agenmestencel-T, at the Klinikum Grosshadern in Munich. [More]
Bone marrow stem cells significantly improve healing, tendon durability during rotator cuff surgery

Bone marrow stem cells significantly improve healing, tendon durability during rotator cuff surgery

An injection of a patient's bone marrow stem cells during rotator cuff surgery significantly improved healing and tendon durability, according to a study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. [More]
Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics provides business update, announces financial results for 2014

Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics provides business update, announces financial results for 2014

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc., a leading developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced financial results for the three months and year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) -- adult cells reprogrammed back to an embryonic stem cell-like state--may better model the genetic contributions to each patient's particular disease. In a process called cellular reprogramming, researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have taken mature blood cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and reprogrammed them back into iPSCs to study the genetic origins of this rare blood cancer. [More]
C3BS plans to open new U.S.-based facility to manufacture C-Cure for use in Phase III trial

C3BS plans to open new U.S.-based facility to manufacture C-Cure for use in Phase III trial

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of engineered cell therapies, today confirmed plans to open a new U.S.-based manufacturing facility in Rochester, Minnesota. The facility will support the Company’s current and anticipated manufacturing needs in the United States for both the Phase III clinical trial evaluating lead cardiovascular product candidate C-Cure (CHART-2), and its recently acquired CAR T-cell therapies’ portfolio. [More]
TSRI scientists identify enzyme that maintains healthy periods of inactivity in HSCs to prevent anemia

TSRI scientists identify enzyme that maintains healthy periods of inactivity in HSCs to prevent anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time—and for good reason. When stem cells become too active and divide too often, they risk acquiring cell damage and mutations. In the case of blood stem cells (also called hematopoietic stem cells or HSCs), this can lead to blood cancers, a loss of blood cells and an impaired ability to fight disease. [More]

ItpkB enzyme regulates stem cells function to prevent cancer, anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time--and for good reason. When stem cells become too active and divide too often, they risk acquiring cell damage and mutations. [More]
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