Calcium News and Research RSS Feed - Calcium News and Research

Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

David Killilea, PhD, a staff scientist at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute- the research arm of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland - co-authored a study into the causes of kidney stones. [More]
NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure

NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure

A protein known to be crucial for maintaining the balance of calcium in cells could prove useful in halting the progression of heart failure. [More]
Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Researchers identify new myosin kinase that could optimize heart contractions

Researchers identify new myosin kinase that could optimize heart contractions

The heart is the only muscle that contracts and relaxes continuously over a lifetime to pump oxygen-rich blood to the body's organs. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center now have identified a previously unrecognized enzyme that could optimize contraction and lead to new strategies to treat heart failure. [More]
Researchers develop new technique for coating polymer implants with bioactive film

Researchers develop new technique for coating polymer implants with bioactive film

Researchers have developed a technique for coating polymer implants with a bioactive film that significantly increases bonding between the implant and surrounding bone in an animal model. [More]
Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

In a large prospective study published online in the British Journal of Cancer, researchers looked at the association between nut consumption and prostate cancer risk and mortality among 47,299 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. [More]
Griffith researchers move one step closer to understanding cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Griffith researchers move one step closer to understanding cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

A new finding in the cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome has been identified by researchers at Griffith University who say they are getting much closer to a complete understanding of this disabling condition. [More]
Study highlights role of intestinal calcium absorption in kidney stone formation

Study highlights role of intestinal calcium absorption in kidney stone formation

Measuring intestinal calcium absorption may help to identify individuals who are prone to develop kidney stones, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Reduced RV functional reserve may explain poor SSc-PAH outcomes

Reduced RV functional reserve may explain poor SSc-PAH outcomes

Patients who develop pulmonary arterial hypertension as a consequence of systemic sclerosis have poorer right ventricular functional reserve than those with idiopathic disease, research published in Circulation shows. [More]
Common angina drug can stimulate patient's own white blood cells to combat cryptococcosis

Common angina drug can stimulate patient's own white blood cells to combat cryptococcosis

A drug, more commonly used in the treatment of angina, could be the focus of a new strategy in fighting the fatal fungal infection cryptococcosis [More]
One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

More than 53 million Americans age 50 and older, primarily women, have osteoporosis or are at high risk for the condition due to low bone density. A recent study of oral bisphosphonates, the most commonly prescribed osteoporosis treatment, found that approximately a third of women prescribed these drugs continue to be at elevated risk for bone fracture, an outcome that may have several origins. [More]
Researchers prove existence of olfactory receptor in pigment-producing skin cells

Researchers prove existence of olfactory receptor in pigment-producing skin cells

Researchers at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum were the first ones to prove the existence of an olfactory receptor in pigment-producing cells in human skin, the so-called melanocytes. The team headed by Prof Dr Dr Dr habil. Hanns Hatt demonstrated that the violet-like scent Beta-Ionone can activate the receptor. [More]
Neutral atherosclerosis trial highlights effectiveness of optimal medical therapy

Neutral atherosclerosis trial highlights effectiveness of optimal medical therapy

Salsalate has no greater effect than placebo on the progression of coronary artery plaque, show the findings of the randomised TINSAL-CVD trial. [More]
Study provides new insights into molecular basis of CaSR-related human diseases

Study provides new insights into molecular basis of CaSR-related human diseases

A study led by researchers at Georgia State University provides new insights into the molecular basis of human diseases resulting from mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a protein found in cell membranes. [More]
Additional drug treatment options to prevent migraine may offer hope to sufferers

Additional drug treatment options to prevent migraine may offer hope to sufferers

Preventing or shortening the duration of migraine attacks - established drug treatment options and those that could shape future therapies were discussed at the Congress of European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. [More]
Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Among the many important processes that happen during a woman's last few weeks of pregnancy is the transfer of calcium to the growing foetus to boost bone development. [More]
New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

Information flow in cells relies on calcium as a key agent in several signalling pathways. Calcium dependent signalling is crucial in nearly every aspect of life - muscle movement, immune reactions, nerve function, light sensing and many such processes. [More]
RBFOX2 dysregulation may cause heart damage in diabetic patients

RBFOX2 dysregulation may cause heart damage in diabetic patients

Cardiac complications are the number one cause of death among diabetics. Now a team of scientists has uncovered a molecular mechanism involved in a common form of heart damage found in people with diabetes. [More]
Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response - a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases. [More]
Tips for improving cardiovascular health

Tips for improving cardiovascular health

New research by UT Southwestern heart specialists shows that sedentary behavior such as sitting for long periods of time at a desk or on the couch is associated with increased amounts of calcium in the arteries, which in turn can lead to higher risk of heart attack. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement