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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Study finds that gene therapy can clip out genetic material associated with heart failure

Study finds that gene therapy can clip out genetic material associated with heart failure

Gene therapy can clip out genetic material linked to heart failure and replace it with the normal gene in human cardiac cells, according to a study led by researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Cardiff scientists identify potential root cause of asthma and highlight new treatment option

Cardiff scientists identify potential root cause of asthma and highlight new treatment option

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Researchers describe natural mechanism that helps repair lesions in teeth

Researchers describe natural mechanism that helps repair lesions in teeth

Researchers at Inserm and Paris Descartes University have just taken an important step in research on stem cells and dental repair. They have managed to isolate dental stem cell lines and to describe the natural mechanism by which they repair lesions in the teeth. This fundamental discovery will make it possible to initiate unprecedented therapeutic strategies to mobilise the resident dental stem cells and magnify their natural capacity for repair. [More]
Spanish scientists find apatite bioceramics from shark teeth for implants

Spanish scientists find apatite bioceramics from shark teeth for implants

Researchers from the BIOCAPS Area of 'Biomaterials, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine' have managed to obtain bioceramics from shark teeth, which have already tested applications in the regeneration of bone tissue, particularly in the fields of traumatology and odontology. [More]
New study shows regular consumption of yogurt not linked to health-related quality of life

New study shows regular consumption of yogurt not linked to health-related quality of life

Dietary recommendations support the consumption of dairy products as part of a healthy diet. However, after a Spanish study involving more than 4,000 people analysed the relationship between the regular intake of yogurt and health-related quality of life, it declared that there was no link with the improvement of the physical and mental parameters analysed. [More]
Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

TGen scientists discover the likely cause of rare type of muscle weakness in six children

Scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), using state-of-the-art genetic technology, have discovered the likely cause of a child's rare type of severe muscle weakness. [More]
CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

A cellular defect that can impair the body's ability to handle high glucose levels and could point the way to a potential new treatment for diabetes has been identified by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Eating high-fat dairy products reduces type 2 diabetes risk

Eating high-fat dairy products reduces type 2 diabetes risk

Consumption of high-fat yoghurt and cheese are linked to a reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes by as much as a fifth, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden. High meat consumption, on the other hand, is linked to a higher risk. [More]
Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire plc today announced that Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection is now available in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Natpara as an adjunct to calcium and vitamin D to control hypocalcemia in patients with hypoparathyroidism on January 23, 2015. [More]
Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Got milk? If you are overweight and have osteoarthritis, you may want to bone up on your dairy products that have vitamin D. [More]
Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Cholesterol-lowering statins have transformed the treatment of heart disease. But while the decision to use the drugs in patients with a history of heart attacks and strokes is mostly clear-cut, that choice can be a far trickier proposition for the tens of millions of Americans with high cholesterol but no overt disease. [More]
Study demonstrates abnormal vitamin D levels in more than one-third of elite NCAA Division I athletes

Study demonstrates abnormal vitamin D levels in more than one-third of elite NCAA Division I athletes

A new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found that more than one-third of elite, Division I college athletes may have low levels of vitamin D, which is critical in helping the body to absorb calcium needed to maintain bone mass, and to minimize musculoskeletal pain and injury risk. [More]
Skipping lunch is a common practice among children, adolescents, shows study

Skipping lunch is a common practice among children, adolescents, shows study

According to new analysis of data from the 2009-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) that evaluated eating patterns of 3,647 children ages 4-13 years, skipping lunch is a common practice among children and adolescents, with 13% of younger children and 17% of 9-13 year olds skipping lunch on a given day. [More]
IMDC prognostic model valid in second-line RCC therapy

IMDC prognostic model valid in second-line RCC therapy

The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium prognostic model can be applied to metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients receiving second-line targeted treatment, according to research published in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
Jr. NBA and FrieslandCampina partnership promotes active lifestyle in South-East Asian children

Jr. NBA and FrieslandCampina partnership promotes active lifestyle in South-East Asian children

FrieslandCampina and Jr. NBA today celebrate the first anniversary of their successful partnership designed to encourage an active lifestyle amongst children in South-East Asia. [More]
Mexican researcher close to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease

Mexican researcher close to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease, which took world fame after being diagnosed in various personalities such as actor Michael J. Fox, the heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali and the painter Salvador DalĂ­, could be very close to a cure, thanks to a Mexican researcher which managed to eliminate its neurological effects with an immunosuppressant. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
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