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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Study shows blood pressure medication is not linked to breast cancer

Study shows blood pressure medication is not linked to breast cancer

Women who take a common type of medication to control their blood pressure are not at increased risk of developing breast cancer due to the drug, according to new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah. [More]
New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

Celiac disease patients suffer from gluten intolerance and must adjust to a life without gluten from food sources like wheat, rye and barley. [More]
Special receptor signalling mediates astrocytic hyperactivity in  Alzheimer's disease mouse model

Special receptor signalling mediates astrocytic hyperactivity in Alzheimer's disease mouse model

It has long been known that astrocytes change their shapes as a consequence of Alzheimer's. Cells located near the "plaques", as the protein deposits typical for this disease are called, grow in size and form additional extensions. [More]
Findings offer insight on mechanism reputed for triggering cell death

Findings offer insight on mechanism reputed for triggering cell death

Synapse, the name for the signal-receiving site on a neuron, comes from the Greek word for contact. Neuroscientists used to maintain that neurons form one-to-one relationship to contact one another. Yet more researchers are finding evidence that shows how neurons function as part of a network. An incoming excitation does not always provoke an outgoing signal. [More]
Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

The landmark discovery of a tiny defect in a vital heart protein has for the first time enabled heart specialists to accurately pinpoint a therapeutic target for future efforts in developing a drug-based cure for cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Baylor College of Medicine and the Georgia Regents University, report for the first time that the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin inhibits the growth of human uterine fibroid tumors. [More]
Load bearing, biodegradable implants can reduce the number of second surgeries

Load bearing, biodegradable implants can reduce the number of second surgeries

No other joint in the human body is as highly mobile as is the shoulder. However, it is also very sensitive and prone to injury, with athletes being particularly affected. [More]
Novel method could improve treatment for infants, young children suffering from HIV/AIDS

Novel method could improve treatment for infants, young children suffering from HIV/AIDS

A novel method of altering a protein in milk to bind with an antiretroviral drug promises to greatly improve treatment for infants and young children suffering from HIV/AIDS, according to a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. [More]
School lunches have greater nutritional quality than packed lunches

School lunches have greater nutritional quality than packed lunches

Approximately 60% of the more than 50 million public elementary and secondary education students obtain a substantial portion of their daily calories from school lunches. The 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program (NSLP) nutritional standards govern what those students eat; for those who bring packed lunches, there are no nutritional standards, however. [More]
Osteoporosis drugs may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton

Osteoporosis drugs may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton

Australian researchers have shown why calcium-binding drugs commonly used to treat people with osteoporosis, or with late-stage cancers that have spread to bone, may also benefit patients with tumours outside the skeleton, including breast cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers capture images of protein complex that keeps hearts beating

Johns Hopkins researchers capture images of protein complex that keeps hearts beating

For years, a multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has tracked an elusive creature, a complex of proteins thought to be at fault in some cases of sudden cardiac death. As they report Nov. 5 in the online edition of Nature Communications, they have finally captured images of the complex. [More]
Hospira launches Paricalcitol Injection

Hospira launches Paricalcitol Injection

Hospira, Inc., the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, today announced the launch of Paricalcitol Injection, a generic version of AbbVie's Zemplar. Hospira obtained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of paricalcitol on Oct. 21 and launched the product Nov. 1. [More]
Dietary supplement KoACT is superior to calcium, vitamin D for bone health, study reveals

Dietary supplement KoACT is superior to calcium, vitamin D for bone health, study reveals

A new study by a Florida State University researcher reveals that a new dietary supplement is superior to calcium and vitamin D when it comes to bone health. [More]
Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors

Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) appear to have a lot in common. They share risk factors such as obesity and they often occur together. If they also share the same genetic underpinings, then doctors could devise a way to treat them together too. [More]
TriStar² S multi-label microplate reader now available with monochromator technology

TriStar² S multi-label microplate reader now available with monochromator technology

With the TriStarĀ² S Berthold Technologies introduces monochromator technology in its basic multi-label microplate reader. [More]
Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

You have to be at least 2 years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. For younger babies, no official U.S. guidance exists other than the general recommendation by national and international organizations that mothers exclusively breastfeed for at least the first six months. [More]
Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

The occurrence of 91 confirmed or probable hypocalcaemic seizures in children with vitamin D deficiency over a 2-year period in the UK highlights a failure to promote appropriate supplementation. [More]
Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Lowering 'bad' cholesterol may help prevent aortic valve disease, study finds

Lowering 'bad' cholesterol may help prevent aortic valve disease, study finds

An international research team led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and Lund University has provided new evidence that aortic valve disease may be preventable. [More]