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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Professor Robert Hill presents first data on dental fillings for smart repair of tooth decay

Professor Robert Hill presents first data on dental fillings for smart repair of tooth decay

The first data on dental fillings that can actively repair tooth decay is presented by Professor Robert Hill. Professor Hill is Chair of Physical Sciences at the Institute of Dentistry at Queen Mary University of London and co-founder and director of research at BioMin Technologies. [More]
CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

Using high-resolution electron microscopy, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have uncovered new details of the structure and function of an intracellular channel that controls the contraction of skeletal muscle. [More]
Researchers discover how mineral ion leaked from dying tumour tissue stops work of immune cells

Researchers discover how mineral ion leaked from dying tumour tissue stops work of immune cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Babraham Institute, UK, have discovered how a mineral ion leaked from tumour tissue as it dies acts to stop the work of anti-tumour immune cells. [More]
Diet high in calcium, low in lactose may decrease risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women

Diet high in calcium, low in lactose may decrease risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and and other U.S. health and academic institutions shows a diet high in calcium and low in lactose may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women. [More]
Article provides insights into nutrient-rich foods that can help prevent glaucoma

Article provides insights into nutrient-rich foods that can help prevent glaucoma

In general, I recommend that my patients include nutrient-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy diet. [More]
Revolutionary new scanning technique creates 3D images of bones with unparalleled resolution

Revolutionary new scanning technique creates 3D images of bones with unparalleled resolution

Chemists from Trinity College Dublin in collaboration with RCSI have devised a revolutionary new scanning technique that produces extremely high-res 3D images of bones -- without exposing patients to X-ray radiation. [More]
BUAP researchers develop biomaterial that can be printed in 3D for regenerating bone tissue

BUAP researchers develop biomaterial that can be printed in 3D for regenerating bone tissue

Researchers at the Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP) developed a biomaterial with the ability to serve as a support for regenerating bone tissue, which is biodegradable and can be printed in 3D with controlled porosity. [More]
UCSB neuroscientist provides new understanding of how the brain uses perception to guide action

UCSB neuroscientist provides new understanding of how the brain uses perception to guide action

A UC Santa Barbara researcher studying how the brain uses perception of the environment to guide action has a new understanding of the neural circuits responsible for transforming sensation into movement. [More]
Stem cells may be responsible for vascular calcification in patients with kidney disease

Stem cells may be responsible for vascular calcification in patients with kidney disease

Scientists have implicated a type of stem cell in the calcification of blood vessels that is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. [More]
Discovery of signalling pathway could pave way for developing treatments targeting T-ALL leukaemia

Discovery of signalling pathway could pave way for developing treatments targeting T-ALL leukaemia

Cooperation between Finnish and Chinese research groups has opened up new opportunities for developing treatments targeting aggressive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). [More]
BetterYou’s oral vitamin D sprays win gold and bronze at Best Baby and Toddler Gear Awards by Mummii

BetterYou’s oral vitamin D sprays win gold and bronze at Best Baby and Toddler Gear Awards by Mummii

An innovative way of boosting the vitamin D levels of expectant mums and infants has been honoured by one of the parenting industries most prestigious award schemes. [More]
New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

In the August 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, new research from the University of Chicago shows how deficits in a specific pathway of genes can lead to the development of atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, which poses a significant health risk. [More]
Giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

Giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

New research from New Zealand's University of Otago has found that giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements may be a possible way to improve their babies' vitamin D status. [More]
Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV has announced the submission of a Type II variation application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), seeking to broaden the existing marketing authorisation for the immunotherapy DARZALEX® (daratumumab) to include treatment of adult patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The expanded indication is based on daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide (an immmunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone, or bortezomib (a PI) and dexamethasone. [More]
Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

For chemists like Sarah Reisman, professor of chemistry at Caltech, synthesizing molecules is like designing your own jigsaw puzzle. You know what the solved puzzle looks like--the molecule--and your job is to figure out the best pieces to use to put it together. [More]
PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

This week, PinnacleHealth became the first hospital in the country to implant the EDWARDS INTUITY Elite valve, a rapid deployment device for surgical aortic valve replacement, after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory

TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory

While calcium's importance for our bones and teeth is well known, its role in neurons—in particular, its effects on processes such as learning and memory—has been less well defined. [More]
Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes

Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes

As we age, our arteries gradually become less flexible, making it harder for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. [More]
New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

Using a new, lightning-fast camera paired with an electron microscope, Columbia University Medical Center scientists have captured images of one of the smallest proteins in our cells to be "seen" with a microscope. [More]
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