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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Meta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

Meta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six biological pathways that may be involved in the genetic predisposition to develop bipolar disorder. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]
CT angiography provides accurate assessment of arterial plaque in diabetic patients

CT angiography provides accurate assessment of arterial plaque in diabetic patients

Imaging of the coronary arteries with computed tomography (CT) angiography provides an accurate assessment of arterial plaque and could have a dramatic impact on the management of diabetic patients who face a high risk of heart attacks and other cardiovascular events, according to a new multicenter study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. [More]
Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

The "brush border" - a densely packed array of finger-like projections called microvilli - covers the surfaces of the cells that line our intestines. [More]
Researchers develop novel tools to learn how astrocytes listen in on neuronal communication

Researchers develop novel tools to learn how astrocytes listen in on neuronal communication

‚ÄčEverything we do - all of our movements, thoughts and feelings - are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. [More]
WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

With growing evidence that a measurement of the buildup of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) researchers found that the process of "calcium scoring" was also accurate in predicting the chances of dying of heart disease among adults with little or no known risk of heart disease. [More]
Protein expression predicts postop NSCLC recurrence, survival

Protein expression predicts postop NSCLC recurrence, survival

US-based researchers have identified a panel of 12 proteins that may help predict overall survival and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer. [More]

Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

A class of drugs widely used to treat osteoporosis appears to impede a cell's ability to repair a protective outer membrane that helps determine what enters and exits, researchers report. [More]

Tau Therapeutics presents data of T-type calcium channel inhibitors in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Tau Therapeutics LLC announced today that its academic collaborator, University of Virginia Professor Todd Bauer, MD, presented data at the 105th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the premier cancer research event held in San Diego, California from April 5-9. [More]

Global clinical trial management system market expected to grow at 14% CAGR by 2019

According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Clinical Trial Management System Market- Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2014 - 2019," the global clinical trial management system market was valued at USD 844.0 million in 2013 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 14% from 2014 to 2019, to reach an estimated value of USD 1,848.5 million in 2019. [More]
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]

FAST Upset Stomach offers one shot dose of Liquid Relief for people suffering from heartburn

First Aid Shot Therapy, makers of First Aid Shot Therapy Pain Relief, today announced the launch of its newest offering, First Aid Shot Therapy Upset Stomach. Upset Stomach is the second variant to be launched in the F.A.S.T. range of products and it is formulated to relive upset stomach symptoms. [More]
Novartis Institute researcher receives second annual Andrew Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences

Novartis Institute researcher receives second annual Andrew Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences

Carnegie Mellon University will award the second annual Andrew Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences to Ricardo Dolmetsch, global head of neuroscience at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research. [More]

Meta-analysis shows calcium supplementation does not raise coronary heart disease in elderly women

The results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases do not support the hypothesis that calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D, increases coronary heart disease or all-cause mortality risk in elderly women. [More]

Study investigates link between bone microstructure in postmenopausal women and prevalent ankle fracture

A study by researchers at the University of Geneva concludes that prevalent ankle fractures should be considered as osteoporotic fractures and taken into account in fracture-risk assessment. [More]

Many women and children in Vietnam have vitamin D and calcium deficiency

Many women and children in Vietnam have a vitamin D or calcium insufficiency or deficiency. Unknown until know, this is a public health issue whose magnitude has just been discovered by researchers at the IRD and the National Nutrition Institute of Hanoi. [More]
New research suggests why vitamin D deficiency screening tests have gained more importance

New research suggests why vitamin D deficiency screening tests have gained more importance

New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests that physicians are ordering vitamin D deficiency screening tests for preventive care purposes rather than after patients develop conditions caused by decreased bone density. [More]
Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Tanya Simuni, M.D., medical director of Northwestern University's Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct a $16 million phase III study of the safety and efficacy of the drug isradipine as a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease. [More]