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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

Low magnesium levels are leading to a worrying level of undissolved calcium and increased heavy metal toxicity which can severely impact on our health and wellbeing, say mineral analysis experts. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Oral vitamin spray or topical magnesium spray can help beat the blues, says TV chef Tonia Buxton

Oral vitamin spray or topical magnesium spray can help beat the blues, says TV chef Tonia Buxton

Boost your mood and energy levels this Blue Monday (16 January) by spraying your way to good health, says TV chef Tonia Buxton. [More]
Biomarker could help identify heart failure patients suitable for cardiac recovery therapies

Biomarker could help identify heart failure patients suitable for cardiac recovery therapies

Investigators at the University of Utah have identified distinct differences in the hearts of advanced heart failure patients who have defied the odds and showed signs of recovery from the disease. Published online in the journal Circulation, the new findings could help clinicians identify the best candidates for cardiac recovery therapies. [More]
Real-time study of medaka fish aboard ISS sheds light on bone metabolism under microgravity

Real-time study of medaka fish aboard ISS sheds light on bone metabolism under microgravity

Tokyo Institute of Technology research: Gravitational biology: Real time imaging and transcriptome analysis of medaka aboard space station [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]
Cell powerhouses may be good therapeutic target for brain injury

Cell powerhouses may be good therapeutic target for brain injury

Cell powerhouses are typically long and lean, but with brain injury such as stroke or trauma, they can quickly become bloated and dysfunctional, say scientists who documented the phenomena in real time for the first time in a living brain. [More]
Researchers discover new natural tooth repair method using Alzheimer's drug

Researchers discover new natural tooth repair method using Alzheimer's drug

A new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp using an Alzheimer's drug has been discovered by a team of researchers at King's College London. [More]
Study shows new role of zinc in optic nerve injury

Study shows new role of zinc in optic nerve injury

For more than two decades, researchers have tried to regenerate the injured optic nerve using different growth factors and/or agents that overcome natural growth inhibition. [More]
"More aggressive" nutrition improves growth and development of tiny premature babies

"More aggressive" nutrition improves growth and development of tiny premature babies

On New Year's Day this coming Sunday, we will once again be waiting to see whereabouts in Austria the first baby is born safe and sound to be our "New Year's Baby 2017". [More]
New study reveals IRBIT's role in facilitating apoptosis

New study reveals IRBIT's role in facilitating apoptosis

Billions of cells in our bodies die every day in an important process called apoptosis. Now, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute have mapped out a sequence of events that are necessary for apoptosis to occur properly. [More]
Scientists develop better material to regenerate bone tissue cells in shorter time

Scientists develop better material to regenerate bone tissue cells in shorter time

A new study has revealed a technology how to cover biodegradable implants with a human skeleton similar mineral. [More]
Calcium channel blockers may be effective drugs against cancer metastasis

Calcium channel blockers may be effective drugs against cancer metastasis

Researchers at the University of Turku, Finland have identified a new way of blocking the spread of cancer. Calcium channel blockers, which are used to lower blood pressure, block breast and pancreatic cancer invasion by inhibiting cellular structures. [More]
Common bacterium that causes gum infections may trigger rheumatoid arthritis

Common bacterium that causes gum infections may trigger rheumatoid arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory "autoimmune" response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Lactate component responsible for anti-tumor effects of plasma medicine, research shows

Lactate component responsible for anti-tumor effects of plasma medicine, research shows

Physical plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter, together with solid, liquid, and gas, and can be completely or partially ionized (thermal/hot or non-thermal/cold plasma, respectively). [More]
Novel plasma medicine with anti-tumor effect discovered

Novel plasma medicine with anti-tumor effect discovered

Nagoya University researchers develop cold plasma-activated Ringer's solution for chemotherapy. The solution has anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo that derive from the lactate component. [More]
Brazilian researchers propose new way for treating thalassemia major

Brazilian researchers propose new way for treating thalassemia major

Iron accumulation in myocardial cells, potentially resulting in heart failure or fatal arrhythmia, is one of the complications most feared by patients with thalassemia major, a hereditary disease also known as Mediterranean anemia. [More]
Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Microscopy's got a long history. It was developed about 350 years ago for scientists to visualize things they could discern, but not describe. The two pioneers of microscopy were Antoine van Leeuwenhoek, who developed the first microscope and soon after the renowned scientist, Robert Hooke. [More]
Tiny, glowing crystals could be powerful new tool to detect and clean contaminated water sources

Tiny, glowing crystals could be powerful new tool to detect and clean contaminated water sources

Tiny, glowing crystals designed to detect and capture heavy-metal toxins such as lead and mercury could prove to be a powerful new tool in locating and cleaning up contaminated water sources. [More]
Study shows cost-effective email messages can help improve calcium intake in Canadians

Study shows cost-effective email messages can help improve calcium intake in Canadians

UBC researchers have demonstrated that simple, cost-effective email messages can help improve the health habits of Canadians. [More]
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