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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

The occurrence of 91 confirmed or probable hypocalcaemic seizures in children with vitamin D deficiency over a 2-year period in the UK highlights a failure to promote appropriate supplementation. [More]
Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. [More]
Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon explains how scoliosis affects Baby Boomers

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. [More]
Lowering 'bad' cholesterol may help prevent aortic valve disease, study finds

Lowering 'bad' cholesterol may help prevent aortic valve disease, study finds

An international research team led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and Lund University has provided new evidence that aortic valve disease may be preventable. [More]
Calchan, Galapagos partner to discover and develop novel target for osteoarthritic pain

Calchan, Galapagos partner to discover and develop novel target for osteoarthritic pain

Calchan Holdings Limited, a UK company focused on the development of novel medicines based on calcium ion channel modulators, and Galapagos NV, a clinical stage biotech company focused on developing novel mode of action medicines, today announce that they have entered into a research collaboration in the area of osteoarthritis pain. [More]
Research findings support causal association between LDL-C, aortic valve disease

Research findings support causal association between LDL-C, aortic valve disease

In an analysis that included approximately 35,000 participants, genetic predisposition to elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was associated with aortic valve calcium and narrowing of the aortic valve, findings that support a causal association between LDL-C and aortic valve disease, according to a study appearing in JAMA. [More]
Study sheds light on why we remember some things and not others

Study sheds light on why we remember some things and not others

Why do we remember some things and not others? In a unique imaging study, two Northwestern University researchers have discovered how neurons in the brain might allow some experiences to be remembered while others are forgotten. It turns out, if you want to remember something about your environment, you better involve your dendrites. [More]
Most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended levels of key nutrients

Most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended levels of key nutrients

A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average. [More]
Frozen meals have better diet quality than QSR meals, shows research

Frozen meals have better diet quality than QSR meals, shows research

New data presented today indicate that consumers of frozen meals had higher daily intakes of dietary fiber, potassium, calcium and protein, and lower daily intakes of calories and saturated fat than consumers of quick service restaurant (QSR) meals. [More]
Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos. [More]
Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center, a trusted NYC nursing home, urges senior citizens and their families to learn the basics of proper nutrition for senior citizens. The nursing facility's staff has created a short list of key tips for families and seniors looking to improve their mental and physical health through dietary changes. [More]
Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. This promising new treatment strategy could expand the current use of photodynamic therapies to access deep-set cancer tumors. [More]
Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density not linked to musculoskeletal pain

Bone mineral density does not contribute to musculoskeletal pain, researchers report in findings that shed light on the controversy over whether osteoporosis is a painless disease. [More]
Magnesium essential to the activity of vitamin D

Magnesium essential to the activity of vitamin D

Extensive research has shown that vitamin D deficiencies play a major role in the development of dozens of diseases, including breast, prostate and colon cancer, as well as diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, psoriasis and mental illness. [More]
Survey finds that 49% of post-menopausal women do not take bone health supplements

Survey finds that 49% of post-menopausal women do not take bone health supplements

Make no bones about it; post-menopausal women are well aware of the risks of brittle bones and fractures; however, a national survey of women taken for AIDP, Inc., the supplier of KoACT, a patented combination of collagen and calcium, found that almost half (49%) are not taking any bone health supplement to address this major health issue. [More]
Experiments show that 'unsung' cells are crucial to the process of bone loss caused by bone disorder

Experiments show that 'unsung' cells are crucial to the process of bone loss caused by bone disorder

Experiments in mice with a bone disorder similar to that in women after menopause show that a scientifically overlooked group of cells are likely crucial to the process of bone loss caused by the disorder, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
Researchers find potential new way to better control immune-mediated diseases

Researchers find potential new way to better control immune-mediated diseases

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that T-cells - a type of white blood cell that learns to recognize and attack microbial pathogens - are activated by a pain receptor. [More]
New study suggests that family meals may be protective against obesity

New study suggests that family meals may be protective against obesity

Increasing rates of adolescent obesity and the likelihood that obesity will carry forward into adulthood, have led to various preventive initiatives. It has been suggested that family meals, which tend to include fruits, vegetables, calcium, and whole grains, could be protective against obesity. [More]
Study uncovers new pathway for treating high blood pressure, heart failure

Study uncovers new pathway for treating high blood pressure, heart failure

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Ottawa Heart Institute has uncovered a new pathway by which the brain uses an unusual steroid to control blood pressure. [More]
Recommendations for nutritional rickets announced

Recommendations for nutritional rickets announced

New consensus recommendations for the management of nutritional rickets include universal vitamin D supplementation during the first year of life. [More]