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Combination of ginger and chili peppers could help reduce cancer risk

Combination of ginger and chili peppers could help reduce cancer risk

For many people, there's nothing more satisfying than a hot, spicy meal. But some research has suggested that capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick, might cause cancer. [More]
New study may help develop effective medication for severe pain

New study may help develop effective medication for severe pain

The nerve cells that transmit pain signals in the body are called nociceptors. When activated they release pro-inflammatory neuropeptides. In order to recognise harmful external influences, nociceptors are equipped with a wide range of receptors. [More]
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat knee and hip joint pain

Ways to prevent, treat knee and hip joint pain

In the past four weeks, more than one-third of people over the age of 55 in the United States have complained about hip or knee pain to their physician. In a lifetime, our hips and knees get a lot of use. There are various ways individuals can reduce the strain placed on their joints to maintain the health of their hips and knees. [More]
Neurons in hypothalamus help maintain blood glucose levels, study finds

Neurons in hypothalamus help maintain blood glucose levels, study finds

To learn what different cells do, scientists switch them on and off and observe what the effects are. There are many methods that do this, but they all have problems: too invasive, or too slow, or not precise enough. Now, a new method to control the activity of neurons in mice, devised by scientists at Rockefeller University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, avoids these downfalls by using magnetic forces to remotely control the flow of ions into specifically targeted cells. [More]
Noninvasive FMRI may help evaluate effectiveness of new pain medications

Noninvasive FMRI may help evaluate effectiveness of new pain medications

New research may allow new, more effective and safer pain medications to reach patients who suffer from chronic pain sooner. According to a recent study published in Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI), to measure the brain's neural response to pain, may be a viable tool for evaluating the effectiveness of new pain medications during the early stages of human drug development - providing the needed objective evidence to prevent the premature discarding of potentially beneficial therapies. [More]
New breakthrough advances our understanding of how brain detects, prevents dehydration

New breakthrough advances our understanding of how brain detects, prevents dehydration

Scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and Duke University have made a breakthrough that advances our understanding of how the brain detects and prevents dehydration. [More]
Compound responsible for chilis' heat may help kill prostate cancer cells

Compound responsible for chilis' heat may help kill prostate cancer cells

Capsaicin, the compound responsible for chilis' heat, is used in creams sold to relieve pain, and recent research shows that in high doses, it kills prostate cancer cells. Now researchers are finding clues that help explain how the substance works. Their conclusions suggest that one day it could come in a new, therapeutic form. [More]
Hot chilli may be the key to lose weight, say Adelaide University researchers

Hot chilli may be the key to lose weight, say Adelaide University researchers

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a high-fat diet may impair important receptors located in the stomach that signal fullness. [More]
Eating spicy food regularly may help us live longer

Eating spicy food regularly may help us live longer

People who consume spicy foods regularly throughout the week have a 14% lower risk of death than people who eat them less than once a week, suggests a study of Chinese individuals. [More]
UC Davis research paves way for designing more effective drugs to relieve pain

UC Davis research paves way for designing more effective drugs to relieve pain

UC Davis researchers have identified the molecular interactions that allow capsaicin to activate the body's primary receptor for sensing heat and pain, paving the way for the design of more selective and effective drugs to relieve pain. Their study appeared online June 8 in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. [More]
Cough reflex sensitivity diminishes in participants exposed to e-cigarette, shows study

Cough reflex sensitivity diminishes in participants exposed to e-cigarette, shows study

With just one exposure to electronic-cigarette (e-cigarette) vapor, participants in a study of 30 healthy subjects demonstrated a diminishment of cough reflex sensitivity. [More]
Capsaicin has beneficial effects on liver damage, study reveals

Capsaicin has beneficial effects on liver damage, study reveals

Results revealed today at the International Liver Congress 2015 show that the daily consumption of capsaicin, the active compound of chilli peppers, was found to have beneficial effects on liver damage. [More]
Chili peppers show promise as diet-based supplement

Chili peppers show promise as diet-based supplement

Don't go chomping on a handful of chili peppers just yet, but there may be help for hopeful dieters in those fiery little Native American fruits. [More]
Unmet medication need in neuropathic pain

Unmet medication need in neuropathic pain

A systematic review and meta-analysis reveals that current treatments for neuropathic pain achieve only a moderate response in patients. [More]
TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children. [More]
Study shows diphenhydramine suppresses cough reflex sensitivity with Dr. Cocoa formulation

Study shows diphenhydramine suppresses cough reflex sensitivity with Dr. Cocoa formulation

Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients seek medical attention. Leading cough researcher Peter V. Dicpinigaitis, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine at New York's Albert Einstein College of Medicine, recently conducted a new cough challenge study among adults, whose results were first presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in September 2014. [More]
Researchers find potential new way to better control immune-mediated diseases

Researchers find potential new way to better control immune-mediated diseases

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that T-cells - a type of white blood cell that learns to recognize and attack microbial pathogens - are activated by a pain receptor. [More]
Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. [More]
Scientists explore chili pepper's effect to develop new drug candidate for pain

Scientists explore chili pepper's effect to develop new drug candidate for pain

Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. [More]
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