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Cetuximab is an investigational IgG1 monoclonal antibody designed to target and block the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), which is expressed on the surface of certain cancer cells in multiple tumor types. Cetuximab is designed to bind to EGFR and prevent natural ligands called growth factors from binding to the receptor and inducing phosphorylation, i.e., activation of signaling to the tumor. The most common drug-related adverse events reported in clinical trials of cetuximab have been an acne-like rash and asthenia. Severe allergic reactions may occur in a small percentage of patients.
Phase 3 study shows Vectibix meets primary endpoint in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS mCRC

Phase 3 study shows Vectibix meets primary endpoint in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that a Phase 3 study evaluating Vectibix (panitumumab) and best supportive care (BSC) met its primary endpoint, demonstrating a statistically significant improvement in overall survival (OS) in patients with chemorefractory wild-type KRAS (exon 2) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) compared to those patients treated with BSC alone. [More]
Stony Brook University, CadheRx Therapeutics sign licensing agreement for anti-cancer technology

Stony Brook University, CadheRx Therapeutics sign licensing agreement for anti-cancer technology

Stony Brook University has entered into a licensing agreement with a startup company, CadheRx Therapeutics, to develop and market an anti-cancer technology discovered by Sabine Brouxhon, MD, Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. [More]
SQUIRE phase III study shows necitumumab improves median overall survival in squamous NSCLC patients

SQUIRE phase III study shows necitumumab improves median overall survival in squamous NSCLC patients

This week, Lancet Oncology reports results of a 1,093-person phase III clinical trial of the drug necitumumab (IMC-11F8) combined with chemotherapies gemcitabine and cisplatin against stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer. With addition of necitumumab, median overall survival was 11.5 months compared with median survival of 9.9 months with the two chemotherapies alone. [More]
Pembrolizumab (Keytruda) effective in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer

Pembrolizumab (Keytruda) effective in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer

Immunotherapy with the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab (Keytruda) was effective in one out of four patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer, according to results presented at the 2015 meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. [More]
Study quantifies different mutational profiles of tumour cell clusters in patients with bowel cancer

Study quantifies different mutational profiles of tumour cell clusters in patients with bowel cancer

Bowel cancer is often driven by mutations in one of several different genes, and a patient can have a cancer with a different genetic make-up to another patient's cancer. Identifying the molecular alterations involved in each patient's cancer enables doctors to choose drugs that best target specific alterations. [More]
Mixture of two anti-EGFR antibodies clinically active in treatment-resistant colorectal cancer

Mixture of two anti-EGFR antibodies clinically active in treatment-resistant colorectal cancer

Patients with advanced colorectal tumors without mutations in the RAS genes derive substantial benefit from anti-EGFR therapies; however, the disease eventually progresses, leaving these patients with few alternative therapeutic options. [More]
Roche announces FDA approval of cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use

Roche announces FDA approval of cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use

Roche today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use. The real-time PCR test is designed to identify KRAS mutations in tumor samples from metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and aid clinicians in determining a therapeutic path for them. [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch for protein that causes HER2-positive breast cancer

Researchers identify molecular switch for protein that causes HER2-positive breast cancer

Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance. [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Novel cancer immunotherapy for dogs could benefit humans as well

Novel cancer immunotherapy for dogs could benefit humans as well

As in humans, cancers in dogs have complex causes. The interaction of the environment, food, and genetic disposition are the most well known factors. Today nearly all methods of human medicine are basically available for dogs with cancer, but this was not true of cancer immunotherapy so far. [More]
Phase III TAS-102 study for metastatic colorectal cancer shows improved survival

Phase III TAS-102 study for metastatic colorectal cancer shows improved survival

The new combination agent TAS-102 is able to improve overall survival compared to placebo in patients whose metastatic colorectal cancer is refractory to standard therapies, researchers said at the ESMO 16th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona. [More]
patients with KRAS wild-type MCRC can benefit from Cetuximab Or Bevacizumab With Combi Chemo Equivalent For patients with KRAS wild-type MCRC

patients with KRAS wild-type MCRC can benefit from Cetuximab Or Bevacizumab With Combi Chemo Equivalent For patients with KRAS wild-type MCRC

For patients with KRAS wild-type untreated colorectal cancer, adding cetuximab or bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy offers equivalent survival, researchers said at the ESMO 16th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona. [More]
Synthetic peptide carrier delivers drugs through blood-brain barrier for cancer treatment

Synthetic peptide carrier delivers drugs through blood-brain barrier for cancer treatment

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have demonstrated in a mouse model that their recently developed synthetic peptide carrier is a potential delivery vehicle for brain cancer chemotherapy drugs and other neurological medications. The findings appear in PLOS ONE. [More]
Avastin and cetuximab extend life of patients with KRAS wild-type advanced bowel cancer

Avastin and cetuximab extend life of patients with KRAS wild-type advanced bowel cancer

CALGB 80405, a large, independent, phase III study, designed to assess the superiority in overall survival (OS) of cetuximab over Avastin (bevacizumab) when combined with either FOLFOX or FOLFIRI chemotherapy in people with previously untreated, KRAS wild-type advanced (metastatic) bowel cancer has failed to meet this primary endpoint. [More]
Patients with advanced colorectal cancer respond well to new combination therapy

Patients with advanced colorectal cancer respond well to new combination therapy

In an aggressive disease known for poor response rates, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found patients with advanced colorectal cancer responded well to a combination therapy of the drugs vermurafenib, cetuximab and irinotecan. [More]
ASCO: Biothera to present phase 2 study data on predictive serum biomarker for NSCLC

ASCO: Biothera to present phase 2 study data on predictive serum biomarker for NSCLC

Biothera will present research at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting linking a potential predictive serum biomarker to the clinical response to Imprime PGG immunotherapy in a recent phase 2 study in non-small cell lung cancer patients. The meeting begins today and runs through June 3 in Chicago. [More]
Amgen presents extended analysis of PEAK study data at ASCO

Amgen presents extended analysis of PEAK study data at ASCO

Amgen today announced results from the Phase 2 PEAK study that reinforce the improved overall survival (OS) benefit of panitumumab (Vectibix®) when used in combination with FOLFOX, an oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy regimen, compared to bevacizumab (Avastin) plus FOLFOX as first-line treatment in patients with wild-type RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
ArQule to present tivantinib clinical trial data at ASCO 2014

ArQule to present tivantinib clinical trial data at ASCO 2014

ArQule, Inc. today announced that tivantinib will be included in seven presentations during the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) to be held from May 30, 2014 to June 3, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. [More]
Study: Cetuximab drug used in combination with chemotherapy to treat advanced colorectal cancer is not effective

Study: Cetuximab drug used in combination with chemotherapy to treat advanced colorectal cancer is not effective

Research from the University of Southampton has shown a drug, used in combination with chemotherapy to treat advanced colorectal cancer, is not effective in some settings, and indeed may result in more rapid cancer progression. [More]
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