Clostridium Difficile News and Research RSS Feed - Clostridium Difficile News and Research

Clostridium difficile is a type of bacterium found in human and animal waste. Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea that occurs in hospitals. It can also cause diarrhea or other intestinal disorders in patients treated with antibiotics.
Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible for smuggling the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens into the cell. [More]
Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical, manufacturer and provider of innovative medical products, is pleased to announce its rollout of SKY 6Xi, disinfection technology for mobile devices. SKY 6Xi uses high intensity (254 nanometer wavelength) ultraviolet light in the "C" spectrum (UVC) at close proximity to thoroughly disinfect a mobile device. The unique power of SKY reduces the risk that Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are transmitted to patients while improving safety for healthcare workers. [More]
Expert guidance highlights strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Expert guidance highlights strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections

New expert guidance highlights strategies for implementing and prioritizing efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) in hospitals. [More]
Hospital infection rates down, but patients still dying of preventable causes

Hospital infection rates down, but patients still dying of preventable causes

Hospitals and nursing homes have been trying to cut the facility-acquired infection rates, which has worked better for some conditions than others. [More]
PCORI to award $7 million contract to Chicago coalition to establish clinical data research network

PCORI to award $7 million contract to Chicago coalition to establish clinical data research network

On December 17, 2013, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) announced its intention to award an 18-month, $7 million contract to a Chicago area coalition of 20 health and hospital organizations including Loyola University Health System. [More]
Study: Severe C. difficile infections occur among children who prescribed antibiotics in doctor's offices

Study: Severe C. difficile infections occur among children who prescribed antibiotics in doctor's offices

The majority of pediatric Clostridium difficile infections, which are bacterial infections that cause severe diarrhea and are potentially life-threatening, occur among children in the general community who recently took antibiotics prescribed in doctor's offices for other conditions, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published this week in Pediatrics. [More]
Viewpoints: Obama's budget punts on entitlements; Medicaid debate rankles states

Viewpoints: Obama's budget punts on entitlements; Medicaid debate rankles states

There is a lesson in this unexpected juxtaposition nevertheless: No nation can safely base its tax and spending plans on inflexible commitments. Political life, both domestic and international, is too unpredictable. Yet U.S. government spending is mostly on autopilot. The government is scheduled to lay out $3.8 trillion this fiscal year -; 70 percent of which will go to mandatory-spending programs, chiefly Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and interest on the federal debt. Mr. Obama's plan for fiscal 2015 does not change this; it would increase overall spending slightly, paying for it with selected tax increases, while shifting money among priorities here and there. But these tweaks would take place within the same 30 percent of discretionary spending that the current budget contains (3/4). [More]
Onset Dermatologics launches 75mg strength of MINOCIN pellet-filled capsules to treat bacterial infections

Onset Dermatologics launches 75mg strength of MINOCIN pellet-filled capsules to treat bacterial infections

Onset Dermatologics, a leader in developing and commercializing prescription products for improving skin health, today announced the launch of a 75mg strength of MINOCIN (minocycline hydrochloride) Pellet-Filled Capsules. [More]

Researchers identify components of C. diff bacteria that can be used to develop better treatment

Rhode Island Hospital researchers have identified components in Clostridium difficile (C. diff) that may lead to new diagnostic tools, and ultimately more timely and effective treatment for this often fatal infection. C. diff is a spore-forming bacterium that causes severe diarrhea and is responsible for 14,000 deaths annually in the U.S. The study is published online in advance of print in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. [More]

Llama-derived antibodies open door to development of new treatments for C. difficile infections

Researchers from the Alberta Glycomics Centre at the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta, in collaboration with researchers at the National Research Council of Canada in Ottawa, have revealed the first molecular views showing how highly specific antibodies derived from llamas may provide a new method for controlling deadly infections from the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). [More]

HHS develops national plan to prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections

Independent evaluators have found that measurable progress in reducing the rates of some targeted HAIs has been achieved under the umbrella of a national plan to prevent HAIs that was developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). [More]
Erosive GERD treatments: an interview with Professor Joaquim Moraes-Filho, University of São Paulo Medical School

Erosive GERD treatments: an interview with Professor Joaquim Moraes-Filho, University of São Paulo Medical School

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. [More]

IBM and OhioHealth collaborate to aid in prevention of infections in hospitals

OhioHealth and IBM today announced a collaboration to aid in the prevention of infections using a first-of-a-kind network of wireless sensors and real-time Big Data analytics that measure hand-washing practices. [More]
Healthcare workers' hands contaminated with C. difficile after routine care, study shows

Healthcare workers' hands contaminated with C. difficile after routine care, study shows

A new study finds nearly one in four healthcare workers' hands were contaminated with Clostridium difficile spores after routine care of patients infected with the bacteria. The study was published in the January issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]

Illinois healthcare coalition receives $7M grant to establish research network to battle chronic illnesses

Governor Quinn today announced that a coalition of 20 health and hospital organizations from Illinois has been awarded an 18-month, $7million federal award to establish a clinical data research network. [More]
Celgene subsidiary presents REVLIMID study results on lymphoma at ASH annual meeting

Celgene subsidiary presents REVLIMID study results on lymphoma at ASH annual meeting

Celgene International Sàrl, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG) today announced that results from two studies of REVLIMID (lenalidomide) combinations in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) were presented at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting in New Orleans, La. [More]
MassBiologics gets FDA orphan drug designation for MBL-HCV1 antibody

MassBiologics gets FDA orphan drug designation for MBL-HCV1 antibody

MassBiologics of the University of Massachusetts Medical School has received an orphan drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for MBL-HCV1, a monoclonal antibody developed to prevent hepatitis C virus recurrence in patients receiving a liver transplant. [More]
C. difficile doesn’t harm infants, but serves as a reservoir to affect adults

C. difficile doesn’t harm infants, but serves as a reservoir to affect adults

Infants and toddlers frequently carry toxigenic Clostridium difficile, usually with no harm to themselves, but can serve as a reservoir and spread the bacteria to adults in whom it can cause severe disease, according to a study by a team of Swedish researchers published ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. [More]

PrimeraDx gets FDA clearance for ICEPlex C. difficile Assay Kit and ICEPlex System

PrimeraDx, a molecular diagnostics company, announced today that the ICEPlex C. difficile Assay Kit and the ICEPlex System have received 510(k) clearance from the United States Food and Drug Administration. [More]

Restoring helpful bacteria of the gut and intestines may treat patients with RCDI, find scientists

Scientists at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and physicians at Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, MD, have found that restoring the normal, helpful bacteria of the gut and intestines may treat patients suffering from recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. Transplanting fecal matter of healthy donors into patients with recurrent C. difficile infection appears to restore normal bacterial composition and resolve infection. [More]