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Study shows how psychedelic drug alters brain activity to produce unusual psychological effects

Study shows how psychedelic drug alters brain activity to produce unusual psychological effects

New research shows that our brain displays a similar pattern of activity during dreams as it does during a mind-expanding drug trip. [More]
SkyeTek releases latest Ultra High Frequency module, the SkyeModule Nova

SkyeTek releases latest Ultra High Frequency module, the SkyeModule Nova

SkyeTek, Inc., the leader in RFID Solutions and HF and UHF Reader Technology, today announced the release of their latest Ultra High Frequency module, the SkyeModule Nova. [More]
Brain activation differences hint at developing course of bipolar disorder

Brain activation differences hint at developing course of bipolar disorder

Results of an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis highlight the differences and similarities in brain activation between youths and adults with bipolar disorder. [More]
Paralyzed man can move fingers and hand with his own thoughts

Paralyzed man can move fingers and hand with his own thoughts

For the first time ever, a paralyzed man can move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to an innovative partnership between The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Battelle. [More]
UT Arlington researchers use portable device to map brain activity responses during cognitive activities

UT Arlington researchers use portable device to map brain activity responses during cognitive activities

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks. [More]
Researchers develop new model of neural network

Researchers develop new model of neural network

A newly-developed, highly accurate representation of the way in which neurons behave when performing movements such as reaching could not only enhance understanding of the complex dynamics at work in the brain, but aid in the development of robotic limbs which are capable of more complex and natural movements. [More]
Children may benefit from targeted treatments specific to pediatric brain activity

Children may benefit from targeted treatments specific to pediatric brain activity

A new study from Bradley Hospital has found that bipolar children have greater activation in the right amygdala - a brain region very important for emotional reaction - than bipolar adults when viewing emotional faces. [More]

Study reveals possible biological link between musical training and improved brain executive functioning

A controlled study using functional MRI brain imaging reveals a possible biological link between early musical training and improved executive functioning in both children and adults, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. [More]
Stress may accelerate cognitive decline later in life

Stress may accelerate cognitive decline later in life

A new study published in the June 18 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience adds to a body of evidence suggesting stress may accelerate cognitive decline later in life. [More]
Excessive abuse of alcohol causes structural damage at molecular level to the brain

Excessive abuse of alcohol causes structural damage at molecular level to the brain

Joint research between the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and the University of Nottingham has identified, for the first time, the structural damage caused at a molecular level to the brain by the chronic excessive abuse of alcohol. [More]

Human mind can rapidly absorb new information by synchronization of brain waves

The human mind can rapidly absorb and analyze new information as it flits from thought to thought. These quickly changing brain states may be encoded by synchronization of brain waves across different brain regions, according to a new study from MIT neuroscientists. [More]
Researchers create three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in a dish

Researchers create three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in a dish

Using a type of human stem cell, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have created a three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in the laboratory, which notably includes functioning photoreceptor cells capable of responding to light, the first step in the process of converting it into visual images. [More]
MRI shows signs of brain injury in moderate and late preterm babies

MRI shows signs of brain injury in moderate and late preterm babies

Babies born 32 to 36 weeks into gestation may have smaller brains and other brain abnormalities that could lead to long-term developmental problems, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Late-life depression could become major risk factor for developing Alzheimer's

Late-life depression could become major risk factor for developing Alzheimer's

Many people develop depression in the latest stages of life, but until now doctors had no idea that it could point to a build up of a naturally occurring protein in the brain called beta-amyloid, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
National Institutes of Health awards $3.4M grant for Alzheimer's disease research

National Institutes of Health awards $3.4M grant for Alzheimer's disease research

As part of its ongoing research to better understand the complexities of the human brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science is embarking on the first effort to map connectivity patterns across the whole brain in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, through its recent award of a $3.4 million grant over five years from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Sleep helps consolidate, strengthen new memories

Sleep helps consolidate, strengthen new memories

In study published today in Science, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show for the first time that sleep after learning encourages the growth of dendritic spines, the tiny protrusions from brain cells that connect to other brain cells and facilitate the passage of information across synapses, the junctions at which brain cells meet. [More]
Brain circuitry rescues tongue while chewing

Brain circuitry rescues tongue while chewing

Eating, like breathing and sleeping, seems to be a rather basic biological task. Yet chewing requires a complex interplay between the tongue and jaw, with the tongue positioning food between the teeth and then moving out of the way every time the jaw clamps down to grind it up. If the act weren't coordinated precisely, the unlucky chewer would end up biting more tongue than burrito. [More]
Duke researchers identify first piece of new brain-repair circuit

Duke researchers identify first piece of new brain-repair circuit

Duke researchers have found a new type of neuron in the adult brain that is capable of telling stem cells to make more new neurons. Though the experiments are in their early stages, the finding opens the tantalizing possibility that the brain may be able to repair itself from within. [More]
Newron Pharmaceuticals submits safinamide NDA to FDA

Newron Pharmaceuticals submits safinamide NDA to FDA

Newron Pharmaceuticals S.p.A. ("Newron"), a research and development company focused on novel CNS and pain therapies, and its partner Zambon S.p.A., an international pharmaceutical company strongly committed to the CNS therapeutic area with a long experience in respiratory disease therapies, woman care and primary care, announce that the New Drug Application (NDA) for safinamide was submitted today to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). [More]
People affected by disorders of compulsivity share common pattern of decision making and brain structure

People affected by disorders of compulsivity share common pattern of decision making and brain structure

People affected by binge eating, substance abuse and obsessive compulsive disorder all share a common pattern of decision making and similarities in brain structure, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. [More]