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Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Every night while you sleep, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain, tracing a pattern that, were it on the surface of your head, might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia. [More]
Excessive consumption of fatty foods could negatively affect cognitive functions in children

Excessive consumption of fatty foods could negatively affect cognitive functions in children

Chances are that children who eat excessive amounts of fatty foods will not only become obese, but will develop cognitive and psychiatric problems when they are older. [More]
Maternal depression may affect child's brain development at critical stages in life

Maternal depression may affect child's brain development at critical stages in life

Depressive symptoms in women during and after pregnancy are associated with reduced thickness of the cortex-the outer layer of the brain responsible for complex thought and behavior-in preschool-age kids, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
Research shows FOXP2 protein affects vocal production of all mammals, not just humans

Research shows FOXP2 protein affects vocal production of all mammals, not just humans

Our current understanding is that mice have either no -- or extremely limited -- neural circuitry and genes similar to those that regulate human speech. According to a recent study published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, this understanding may be incorrect. [More]
TSRI scientists uncover clues to abnormal brain connections in autism

TSRI scientists uncover clues to abnormal brain connections in autism

Autism is an agonizing puzzle, a complex mixture of genetic and environmental factors. One piece of this puzzle that has emerged in recent years is a biochemical cascade called the mTOR pathway that regulates growth in the developing brain. [More]
Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A non-invasive protocol testing the ability to recognize, remember and distinguish between odors was able to identify older individuals who - according to genetic, imaging and more detailed memory tests - were at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

There are many grades of spinal cord injuries, in terms of range of movement, from small disabilities to becoming wheelchair bound for the rest of your life, the range is very broad. [More]
Brain-machine interface training may be promising approach for treating phantom limb pain

Brain-machine interface training may be promising approach for treating phantom limb pain

Phantom limb pain is the pain experienced following loss of a limb, either from injury or amputation. [More]
Research shows corticotrophs in the brain can influence avoidance behavior after onset of stress

Research shows corticotrophs in the brain can influence avoidance behavior after onset of stress

German Resilience Center presents new findings on the resistance to stress. A person exposed to stress can usually rapidly adapt the own behavior to the specific situation. [More]
TSRI scientists discover sub-region in the brain that works to form contextual fear memory

TSRI scientists discover sub-region in the brain that works to form contextual fear memory

While the romantic poets' idea of memories being akin to spirits may have poetic merit, the scientists' perspective is that memories are concrete, physical entities that can be visualized within various regions of the brain. [More]
Researchers compare how neuronal activity differs in conscious and anesthetized mice

Researchers compare how neuronal activity differs in conscious and anesthetized mice

Establishing how the brain produces consciousness is one of the most challenging research questions in the field of neuroscience. [More]
Researchers to explore movement signatures for detecting learning disability in children with autism

Researchers to explore movement signatures for detecting learning disability in children with autism

An Indiana University physicist and neuroscientist who studies how physical movement can be used to detect autism in children and adults has received support from the National Science Foundation. [More]
New research shows how synthetic DNA vaccine approach protects against Zika virus infection

New research shows how synthetic DNA vaccine approach protects against Zika virus infection

As the global spread of the Zika virus continues, efforts are underway to halt the disease's transmission. [More]
Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Brain imaging scans may one day provide useful information on the response to psychotherapy in patients with depression or anxiety, according to a review of current research in the November/December issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Wireless brain–spine interface enables primates with spinal cord injury to walk again

Wireless brain–spine interface enables primates with spinal cord injury to walk again

Scientists have developed a wireless brain implant that restores movement in the legs of paralyzed macaques, enabling the animals to walk again. [More]
Bone gene in mammals may take additional role to promote cognition in humans

Bone gene in mammals may take additional role to promote cognition in humans

A gene that regulates bone growth and muscle metabolism in mammals may take on an additional role as a promoter of brain maturation, cognition and learning in human and nonhuman prim ates, according to a new study led by neurobiologists at Harvard Medical School. [More]
Stanford researchers discover new biological markers to measure progression of Huntington's disease

Stanford researchers discover new biological markers to measure progression of Huntington's disease

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have identified several new biological markers to measure the progression of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). [More]
Scanning people's brains with fMRI more effective at spotting lies than traditional polygraph test

Scanning people's brains with fMRI more effective at spotting lies than traditional polygraph test

When it comes to lying, our brains are much more likely to give us away than sweaty palms or spikes in heart rate, new evidence from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggests. [More]
Brain inflammation may have direct involvement in development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

Brain inflammation may have direct involvement in development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

For the first time, researchers have shown that inflammation in the brain may have direct involvement in the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In addition, they found that the number of years one plays contact sports may predict the occurrence of CTE and that this association is partly due to increased inflammation in the brain. [More]
Research findings offer detailed insight into mechanics of learning

Research findings offer detailed insight into mechanics of learning

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin can now map what happens neurologically when new information influences a person to change his or her mind, a finding that offers more insight into the mechanics of learning. [More]
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