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Researchers identify mechanisms that guide interneurons to the striatum

Researchers identify mechanisms that guide interneurons to the striatum

Researchers from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology at King´s College London, led by Prof. Oscar Marín, have identified the mechanisms guiding interneurons to the striatum, a major brain centre involved in the coordination of body movement and motivation. [More]
INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) announced winners today of its inaugural best abstract competition at the 12th World Congress in Montreal. [More]
New study sheds light on brain mechanisms that support people's voting decisions

New study sheds light on brain mechanisms that support people's voting decisions

A new joint study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, both at McGill University, has cast some light on the brain mechanisms that support people's voting decisions. [More]
Weekly sessions of non-invasive brain stimulation improve outcomes in patients with post-stroke pain

Weekly sessions of non-invasive brain stimulation improve outcomes in patients with post-stroke pain

Weekly sessions of non-invasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation provided sufficient long-term pain relief in 61 percent of patients with central post-stroke pain, and delivered long-term relief for patients who continued for one year, according to a study presented at the International Neuromodulation Society 12th World Congress by Masahito Kobayashi, MD, PhD, of the Department of Neurosurgery, Saitama Medical University - Department of Neurology, Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Mihara Memorial Hospital in Saitama, Japan. [More]
Brain protein key to binge drinking? An interview with Dr. Candice Contet

Brain protein key to binge drinking? An interview with Dr. Candice Contet

Alcohol binge drinking is mostly driven by positive reinforcement, a process in which a rewarding experience (e.g., the euphoria one feels when intoxicated) strengthens the behaviour leading to this experience (e.g., going to a bar). [More]
Young children who receive surgical anesthesia have diminished brain function

Young children who receive surgical anesthesia have diminished brain function

Children who received general anesthesia for surgery before age 4 had diminished language comprehension, lower IQ and decreased gray matter density in posterior regions of their brain, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Resting-state connectivity changes underpinning ICDs identified

Resting-state connectivity changes underpinning ICDs identified

The presence of impulse control disorders is associated with reduced resting-state connectivity between part of the associative striatum and both associative and limbic cortical regions in patients with Parkinson’s disease, a study suggests. [More]
Delay of gratification linked to white matter connectivity in the dorsal prefrontal cortex

Delay of gratification linked to white matter connectivity in the dorsal prefrontal cortex

The ability to delay gratification in chimpanzees is linked to how specific structures of the brain are connected and communicate with each other, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Kennesaw State University. [More]
People with high moral reasoning skills show increased gray matter in brain

People with high moral reasoning skills show increased gray matter in brain

Individuals with a higher level of moral reasoning skills showed increased gray matter in the areas of the brain implicated in complex social behavior, decision making, and conflict processing as compared to subjects at a lower level of moral reasoning, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with a researcher from Charité Universitätsmediz in Berlin, Germany. [More]
Newly discovered nerve cells trigger locomotion, supply the brain with speed-related information

Newly discovered nerve cells trigger locomotion, supply the brain with speed-related information

Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the University of Bonn led by Prof. Stefan Remy report on this in the journal "Neuron". Their investigations give new insights into the workings of spatial memory. Furthermore, they could also help improve our understanding of movement related symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease. [More]

Research findings challenge the model of memory forming in hippocampus

The hippocampus plays a crucial role in memory formation. However, it is not yet fully understood in what way that brain structure's individual regions are involved in the formation of memories. Neuroscientists at the Collaborative Research Center 874 at RUB have recreated this process with the aid of computer simulations. [More]

Northeastern University researcher reports finding epicenter of brain's prediction

In recent years, sci­en­tists have dis­cov­ered the human brain works on pre­dic­tions, con­trary to the pre­vi­ously accepted theory that it reacts to the sen­sa­tions it picks up from the out­side world. Experts say humans' reac­tions are in fact the body adjusting to pre­dic­tions the brain is making based on the state of our body the last time it was in a sim­ilar situation. [More]
New study sheds light on the disruption of astrocytes in depression

New study sheds light on the disruption of astrocytes in depression

A new study published by the team of Naguib Mechawar, Ph.D., a researcher with the McGill Group for Suicide Studies of the Douglas Institute (CIUSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'Ile de Montreal) and associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University, sheds new light on the disruption of astrocytes in depression. [More]
Even during quiet moments, our brains are preparing us to be socially connected to other people

Even during quiet moments, our brains are preparing us to be socially connected to other people

A new study by UCLA neuroscientists sheds light on why Facebook is such a popular diversion for people who feel like taking a break. [More]
Scientists develop human cortical spheroids

Scientists develop human cortical spheroids

A patient tormented by suicidal thoughts gives his psychiatrist a few strands of his hair. She derives stem cells from them to grow budding brain tissue harboring the secrets of his unique illness in a petri dish. She uses the information to genetically engineer a personalized treatment to correct his brain circuit functioning. Just Sci-fi? Yes, but... [More]
Differences in brain expression of RORA protein levels may lead to sex bias in autism

Differences in brain expression of RORA protein levels may lead to sex bias in autism

George Washington University researcher Valerie Hu, Ph.D., has found an important sex-dependent difference in the level of RORA protein in brain tissues of males and females. Specifically, females without autism have a slightly higher level of RORA in the frontal cortex of the brain than males without autism, while the levels of the protein are comparably lower in the brain of both males and females with autism. [More]
MIT researchers find neural circuit that appears to cause decision-making in approach-avoidance conflict

MIT researchers find neural circuit that appears to cause decision-making in approach-avoidance conflict

Some decisions arouse far more anxiety than others. Among the most anxiety-provoking are those that involve options with both positive and negative elements, such choosing to take a higher-paying job in a city far from family and friends, versus choosing to stay put with less pay. [More]
Surprising link found between creative problem-solving and increased activity in the cerebellum

Surprising link found between creative problem-solving and increased activity in the cerebellum

Investigators at Stanford University have found a surprising link between creative problem-solving and heightened activity in the cerebellum, a structure located in the back of the brain and more typically thought of as the body's movement-coordination center. [More]
UB researchers identify mechanisms behind some autistic behaviors, suggest potential targets

UB researchers identify mechanisms behind some autistic behaviors, suggest potential targets

Scientists at the University at Buffalo have identified the mechanisms behind a genetic mutation that produces certain autistic behaviors in mice, as well as therapeutic strategies to restore normal behaviors. [More]
Electric brain stimulation may improve short-term memory in individuals with schizophrenia

Electric brain stimulation may improve short-term memory in individuals with schizophrenia

Lightly stimulating the brain with electricity may improve short-term memory in people with schizophrenia, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. [More]
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