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Cortisol is a hormone made by the adrenal cortex (the outer layer of the adrenal gland). It helps the body use glucose (a sugar), protein, and fats. Cortisol made in the laboratory is called hydrocortisone. It is used to treat many conditions, including inflammation, allergies, and some cancers. Cortisol is a type of glucocorticoid hormone.
Social networks may cause stress to children and adolescents

Social networks may cause stress to children and adolescents

Research has shown the significance of social relationships in influencing adult human behavior and health; however, little is known about how children's perception of their social networks correlates with stress and how it may influence development. Now, a University of Missouri research team has determined that children and adolescents physically react to their social networks and the stress those networks may cause. Scientists believe that the quality and size of the social relationships nurtured in childhood may have important physiological consequences for physical and mental health for youth. [More]
Young people with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide, depression

Young people with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide, depression

Children with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide as well as for depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions long after their disease has been successfully treated, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Women's stress hormone levels before pregnancy may predict lower-birthweight baby

Women's stress hormone levels before pregnancy may predict lower-birthweight baby

Before women even become pregnant, their biological profile may predict a lower-birthweight baby, a UCLA-led research team reports. [More]
Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and A-Rod have all used it, but does platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) really work for the every-day active person? According to a University of Alberta Glen Sather Sports Medicine Clinic pilot study on patients with chronically sore shoulders published in PLOS ONE, preliminary findings say yes. [More]
Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

A potential correlation between pre-labor cesarean delivery (PLCD) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could offer new targets for cancer prevention research, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
Irregular sleep schedules linked to adverse metabolic health in midlife women

Irregular sleep schedules linked to adverse metabolic health in midlife women

A new study suggests that frequent shifts in sleep timing may be related to adverse metabolic health among non-shift working, midlife women. [More]
Psychological techniques help reduce body dissatisfaction in women with bulimia nervosa

Psychological techniques help reduce body dissatisfaction in women with bulimia nervosa

Researchers from the University of Granada have proven that there are two psychological techniques that help reducing body dissatisfaction and its associated symptoms in women with bulimia nervosa, both of them based in the exposure of their bodies in a mirror. [More]
Mood disorder experts question effectiveness of metyrapone drug

Mood disorder experts question effectiveness of metyrapone drug

Pioneering research by mood disorder experts at Newcastle University has questioned the effectiveness of metyrapone, a drug suggested to treat depression. [More]
Low levels of cortisol in bipolar patients associated with depression, obesity and metabolic syndrome

Low levels of cortisol in bipolar patients associated with depression, obesity and metabolic syndrome

New observations show that older bipolar patients often have decreased activity in the hormone system responsible for the secretion of the stress hormone cortisol. Low levels of cortisol in bipolar patients were also associated with depression, low quality of life, obesity, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. [More]
USC-led study finds link between anxiety and dementia

USC-led study finds link between anxiety and dementia

People who experienced high anxiety any time in their lives had a 48 percent higher risk of developing dementia compared to those who had not, according to a new study led by USC researchers. [More]
Feeling sad can alter levels of inflammatory proteins linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases

Feeling sad can alter levels of inflammatory proteins linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases

Feeling sad can alter levels of stress-related opioids in the brain and increase levels of inflammatory proteins in the blood that are linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases including heart disease, stroke and metabolic syndrome, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Major clinical trial launched to test ways to slow or halt mental decline in seniors

Major clinical trial launched to test ways to slow or halt mental decline in seniors

Some decline in memory and cognitive function is a normal part of aging, but what if it could be prevented? Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis have launched a major clinical trial to investigate whether mental decline in seniors can be slowed or halted through exercise and other health-related interventions. [More]
Facebook can have both positive and negative effects on teens' stress hormone levels

Facebook can have both positive and negative effects on teens' stress hormone levels

Facebook can have positive and negative effects on teens levels of a stress hormone, say researchers at the University of Montreal and the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal. Led by Professor Sonia Lupien, the team found that having more than 300 Facebook friends increased teens' levels of cortisol. [More]
Hypersexual disorder can be linked to hyperactive stress systems

Hypersexual disorder can be linked to hyperactive stress systems

New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that hypersexual disorder - known popularly as sex addiction - can be linked to hyperactive stress systems. In a stress regulation test using the cortisone drug dexamethasone, men with hypersexual disorder showed higher levels of stress hormones than controls, a finding that the researchers hope will contribute to improved therapy for this patient group. [More]
Pre-clinical study demonstrates positive effects of advanced prebiotic on neuro-inflammation, anxiety

Pre-clinical study demonstrates positive effects of advanced prebiotic on neuro-inflammation, anxiety

Clasado Biosciences Limited, the producers and suppliers of the second generation prebiotic Bimuno(R) (B-GOS), a unique trans-galactooligosaccharide, and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, today announce the results of their latest pre-clinical study demonstrating a major role of the unique carbohydrate complex Bimuno against neuro-inflammation and anxiety. [More]
Scientists reveal link between depression and paraventricular thalamus

Scientists reveal link between depression and paraventricular thalamus

Scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute have shown that a mouse strain with a mutation that leads to dysfunction of mitochondria--the "powerhouses" that provide energy to cells--spontaneously undergo periodic episodes of depression-like behavior that resemble those in human. Through this research, published in Molecular Psychiatry, the scientists uncovered a link between depression and the paraventricular thalamus, a region of the brain not previously tied to depression. [More]
High levels of satiety hormone leptin contribute to cardiovascular disease in obese individuals

High levels of satiety hormone leptin contribute to cardiovascular disease in obese individuals

While high levels of the satiety hormone leptin don't help obese individuals lose weight, they do appear to directly contribute to their cardiovascular disease, researchers report. [More]
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor discusses causes, consequences of weight stigma

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor discusses causes, consequences of weight stigma

There's a dark side to obesity that's only recently getting attention; millions of people from all walks of life are often stigmatized and even shamed based on their weight -and it's one of the most pervasive and acceptable forms of bias and discrimination. In advance of Weight Stigma Awareness Week (September 21-25), Stacey Cahn, PhD, associate professor of clinical psychology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, discusses the causes and consequences of weight stigma. [More]
Researchers discover new gene that could be a potential therapeutic target for muscle wasting

Researchers discover new gene that could be a potential therapeutic target for muscle wasting

It is estimated that half of all cancer patients suffer from a muscle wasting syndrome called cachexia. Cancer cachexia impairs quality of life and response to therapy, which increases morbidity and mortality of cancer patients. Currently, there is no approved treatment for muscle wasting but a new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and University of Alberta could be a game changer for patients, improving both quality of life and longevity. [More]
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