Cortisol News and Research RSS Feed - Cortisol News and Research

Cortisol is a hormone made by the adrenal cortex (the outer layer of the adrenal gland). It helps the body use glucose (a sugar), protein, and fats. Cortisol made in the laboratory is called hydrocortisone. It is used to treat many conditions, including inflammation, allergies, and some cancers. Cortisol is a type of glucocorticoid hormone.
QUT neuroscientist shows how brainpower could be key to mange stress and lose weight

QUT neuroscientist shows how brainpower could be key to mange stress and lose weight

A QUT neuroscientist internationally acclaimed for her research on alcohol and sugar addiction claims brainpower rather than willpower is the key to living healthily. [More]
New biomarker in cell-free blood plasma linked to overactive stress system in suicidal individuals

New biomarker in cell-free blood plasma linked to overactive stress system in suicidal individuals

Researchers at Lund and Malmö universities in Sweden have measured a biomarker in cell-free blood plasma which can be linked to an overactive stress system in suicidal individuals. This biomarker can hopefully be used in future psychiatric studies. [More]
NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

Cortisol is a life sustaining adrenal hormone essential to maintaining the natural balance of the body. [More]
Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Too little sleep takes a toll on your heart, according to a new study to be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
UMass researchers receive federal grant to improve health of low-income African-American men

UMass researchers receive federal grant to improve health of low-income African-American men

Researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have been awarded a five-year, $2.3 million federal grant to study and build upon the success of an innovative program in Springfield, MA to improve the health of low-income African-American men. [More]
How toxic is your stress?

How toxic is your stress?

The term “stress” originates not in our minds or bodies, but from physics. It is the internal forces generated in an object in response to an external load. In the 1950s, Hans Selye adopted the term to characterize how living organisms change... [More]
Research shows corticotrophs in the brain can influence avoidance behavior after onset of stress

Research shows corticotrophs in the brain can influence avoidance behavior after onset of stress

German Resilience Center presents new findings on the resistance to stress. A person exposed to stress can usually rapidly adapt the own behavior to the specific situation. [More]
Researchers elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying negative effects of early-life stress

Researchers elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying negative effects of early-life stress

Scientists have long known that chronic exposure to psychosocial stress early in life can lead to an increased vulnerability later in life to diseases linked to immune dysfunction and chronic inflammation, including arthritis, asthma, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and even mental illness. [More]
Moderate exercise like running may improve ability to memorize facts for school

Moderate exercise like running may improve ability to memorize facts for school

Ever worried that all the information you've crammed in during a study session might not stay in your memory? The answer might be going for a run, according to a new study published in Cognitive Systems Research. [More]
Hormone levels in hair can predict chances of pregnancy in women undergoing IVF treatment

Hormone levels in hair can predict chances of pregnancy in women undergoing IVF treatment

Levels of a hormone when measured in hair can significantly predict the likelihood of pregnancy in women undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment, scientists at The University of Nottingham have revealed. [More]
Wayne State receives NIH grant to study use of opioid addiction drug to fight relapse in recovering addicts

Wayne State receives NIH grant to study use of opioid addiction drug to fight relapse in recovering addicts

A team led by Wayne State University School of Medicine researcher Mark Greenwald, Ph.D., will use a four-year, $2,279,723 competitively renewed grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to explore whether the opioid addiction treatment medication buprenorphine can decrease the magnitude and/or duration of responses to stressors faced by recovering addicts. [More]
Researchers design novel biosensor that can detect and quantify glucose in sweat

Researchers design novel biosensor that can detect and quantify glucose in sweat

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas are sweating the small stuff in their efforts to develop a wearable device that can monitor an individual's glucose level via perspiration on the skin. [More]
Endocrine Society issues new guidelines on hypopituitarism

Endocrine Society issues new guidelines on hypopituitarism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline that recommends treating insufficient hormone levels in individuals with hypopituitarism by replacing hormones at levels as close to the body's natural patterns as possible. [More]
UManage Center to help people with chronic illness manage fatigue and impaired sleep

UManage Center to help people with chronic illness manage fatigue and impaired sleep

The College of Nursing at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently was awarded a five-year, $1.23 million grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research to create a new center where scientists will develop technologies to help people with chronic illness manage fatigue and impaired sleep. [More]
Juvenile offenders with PTSD at greater risk of entering substance abuse treatment, study finds

Juvenile offenders with PTSD at greater risk of entering substance abuse treatment, study finds

Juvenile offenders who have a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder are at 67 percent greater risk of entering substance abuse treatment within seven years, a new study found. [More]
High cortisol levels during morning sessions provide more benefits to psychotherapy patients

High cortisol levels during morning sessions provide more benefits to psychotherapy patients

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. [More]
Research findings provide new clues to treat metabolic diseases

Research findings provide new clues to treat metabolic diseases

When people are deprived of food, a number of biological mechanisms are set in motion to adapt the body's metabolism to the conditions of scarcity. [More]
Training during first two weeks of menstrual cycle can have more effect on muscular strength

Training during first two weeks of menstrual cycle can have more effect on muscular strength

Research at Umeå University provides new insights into when during the menstrual cycle it is advantageous to periodise your strength training. [More]
UAB researchers find microRNA as potential therapeutic target for MDD

UAB researchers find microRNA as potential therapeutic target for MDD

A tiny RNA appears to play a role in producing major depression, the mental disorder that affects as many as 250 million people a year worldwide. [More]
Targeting specific neurons in the brain may provide effective treatment for anxiety

Targeting specific neurons in the brain may provide effective treatment for anxiety

Clinical anxiety affects up to 30 percent of Americans who are in great need of better treatments with fewer side effects. [More]
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