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Cortisol is a hormone made by the adrenal cortex (the outer layer of the adrenal gland). It helps the body use glucose (a sugar), protein, and fats. Cortisol made in the laboratory is called hydrocortisone. It is used to treat many conditions, including inflammation, allergies, and some cancers. Cortisol is a type of glucocorticoid hormone.
New technique could help produce enhanced imaging results with ordinary microscopes

New technique could help produce enhanced imaging results with ordinary microscopes

Research completed through a collaboration with University of Missouri engineers, biologists, and chemists could transform how scientists study molecules and cells at sub-microscopic (nanoscale) levels. [More]
Study shows workplace conditions may contribute to gender-based job stress

Study shows workplace conditions may contribute to gender-based job stress

Social scientists have long known that women working in numerically male-dominated occupations like physics and firefighting report experiencing workplace stress, but men who work in numerically female-dominated occupations like nursing and child care do not. [More]
New ESE guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for handling adrenal incidentalomas

New ESE guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for handling adrenal incidentalomas

The appropriate clinical response to adrenal incidentaloma should depend on the likelihood of malignancy, according to new guidelines published today by the European Society of Endocrinology, in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumours and first presented at ESE's annual European Congress of Endocrinology in May 2016. [More]
Study finds link between cortisol levels and obesity in patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent depressions

Study finds link between cortisol levels and obesity in patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent depressions

Low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are linked to obesity, high levels of fat in the blood and metabolic syndrome among patients with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder. This according to a study at Umea University in Sweden published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. [More]
Traumatic images induce stronger alcohol craving than stress in military veterans

Traumatic images induce stronger alcohol craving than stress in military veterans

Post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol dependence (AD) are two of the most common and debilitating disorders diagnosed among American military veterans. AD and PTSD often occur together, and this co-occurrence has a worse prognosis than either disorder alone. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Poisonous plants cause the most common allergic reactions to the skin, affecting as many as 50 million Americans each year, according to the American Skin Association. University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Walter Schrading, M.D., says it is important people are able to identify poisonous plants, prevent an allergic reaction and treat skin irritations after contact. [More]
Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Stress is actually a bit of a buzzword. The initial definition was “the reaction to changes”, which is why you get stressed also when good things happen, hence the distinction between good stress, eustress, and bad stress, distress. [More]
Classical music by Mozart and Strauss could lower blood pressure and heart rate

Classical music by Mozart and Strauss could lower blood pressure and heart rate

The music of Mozart and Strauss is able to lower blood lipid concentrations and the heart rate. [More]
Lessons on personality changes can help mitigate stress, improve academic performance in teenagers

Lessons on personality changes can help mitigate stress, improve academic performance in teenagers

Teaching teens that social and personality traits can change helps them cope with social challenges such as bullying, which in turn can help mitigate stress and improve academic performance, according to a study by psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
Creative art making can help reduce stress

Creative art making can help reduce stress

Whether you're Van Gogh or a stick-figure sketcher, a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body. [More]
Study finds link between stress hormone and stage of schizophrenia

Study finds link between stress hormone and stage of schizophrenia

JCU Associate Professor Zoltan Sarnyai said it was the first meta-analysis study to compare the level of cortisol in a waking patient's body with the stage of schizophrenia they are suffering. [More]
Alcohol exposure during early to mid-adolescence linked to chronic stress vulnerability

Alcohol exposure during early to mid-adolescence linked to chronic stress vulnerability

Drinking during early to mid-adolescence can lead to vulnerability to chronic stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. [More]
Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress and depression during pregnancy may activate certain protective mechanisms in babies. Psychologists from the University of Basel together with international colleagues report that certain epigenetic adaptations in newborns suggest this conclusion. [More]
Social networks may cause stress to children and adolescents

Social networks may cause stress to children and adolescents

Research has shown the significance of social relationships in influencing adult human behavior and health; however, little is known about how children's perception of their social networks correlates with stress and how it may influence development. Now, a University of Missouri research team has determined that children and adolescents physically react to their social networks and the stress those networks may cause. Scientists believe that the quality and size of the social relationships nurtured in childhood may have important physiological consequences for physical and mental health for youth. [More]
Young people with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide, depression

Young people with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide, depression

Children with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide as well as for depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions long after their disease has been successfully treated, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Women's stress hormone levels before pregnancy may predict lower-birthweight baby

Women's stress hormone levels before pregnancy may predict lower-birthweight baby

Before women even become pregnant, their biological profile may predict a lower-birthweight baby, a UCLA-led research team reports. [More]
Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Platelet-rich plasma therapy may help improve tissue healing

Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and A-Rod have all used it, but does platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) really work for the every-day active person? According to a University of Alberta Glen Sather Sports Medicine Clinic pilot study on patients with chronically sore shoulders published in PLOS ONE, preliminary findings say yes. [More]
Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

A potential correlation between pre-labor cesarean delivery (PLCD) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could offer new targets for cancer prevention research, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. [More]
Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

Strong link found between incarceration of family members during childhood and heart attacks in men

A parent's incarceration has immediate, devastating effects on a family. Now, Virginia Tech and University of Toronto researchers say there may be a longer term risk: Men who as children experienced a family member's incarceration are approximately twice as likely to have a heart attack in later adulthood in comparison with men who were not exposed to such a childhood trauma. [More]
Irregular sleep schedules linked to adverse metabolic health in midlife women

Irregular sleep schedules linked to adverse metabolic health in midlife women

A new study suggests that frequent shifts in sleep timing may be related to adverse metabolic health among non-shift working, midlife women. [More]
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