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Cortisol is a hormone made by the adrenal cortex (the outer layer of the adrenal gland). It helps the body use glucose (a sugar), protein, and fats. Cortisol made in the laboratory is called hydrocortisone. It is used to treat many conditions, including inflammation, allergies, and some cancers. Cortisol is a type of glucocorticoid hormone.
Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on strategies for treating Cushing's syndrome, a condition caused by overexposure to the hormone cortisol. [More]
Hormones play dual role in unethical behavior

Hormones play dual role in unethical behavior

Hormones play a two-part role in encouraging and reinforcing cheating and other unethical behavior, according to research from Harvard University and The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Study demonstrates that stress hormone cortisol can reduce heroin cravings

Every addiction is characterized by a strong desire for a certain addictive substance, be it nicotine, alcohol or other drug. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland recently conducted a study on heroin addiction and demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol can reduce addictive cravings. [More]
Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

The hormones testosterone and cortisol may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks, according to a study. Researchers simulated the trading floor in the lab by having volunteers buy and sell assets among themselves. They measured the volunteers' natural hormone levels in one experiment and artificially raised them in another. [More]
Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

The stress hormone cortisol strengthens memories of scary experiences. However, it is effective not only while the memory is being formed for the first time, but also later when people look back at an experience while the memory reconsolidates. This has been published by cognition psychologists from the Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum in the journal "Neuropsychopharmacology". [More]
Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

When you're having trouble sleeping, light is the last thing you assume you need. But according to a pilot study attempting to solve insomnia among lung cancer patients led by University at Buffalo sleep researcher Grace Dean, light may just be the answer. [More]
Lower-functioning children with ASD exhibit higher levels of cortisol

Lower-functioning children with ASD exhibit higher levels of cortisol

Researchers at the Institute for Autism Research at Canisius College have found that functional level appears to play a critical role in the stress levels of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specifically, lower-functioning children with ASD (LFASD) exhibited significantly higher levels of cortisol, the primary stress hormone in humans, than both high-functioning children with ASD (HFASD) and typical children. [More]
Traffic noise could increase risk of mid-riff bulge

Traffic noise could increase risk of mid-riff bulge

Road traffic noise is linked to a heightened risk of developing a mid-riff bulge, indicates research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine. [More]
Mifepristone-eribulin combination clinically active in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Mifepristone-eribulin combination clinically active in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Corcept Therapeutics Incorporated, a pharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of drugs that treat severe metabolic, oncologic and psychiatric disorders by modulating the effects of cortisol, today announced results of a multi-center Phase 1/2 dose-escalation study of mifepristone and chemotherapy drug eribulin (Halaven) that show it is well tolerated and clinically active in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced its financial results for the quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the first quarter of 2015, the Company reported a net loss of $1.2 million, or $0.01 loss per share, compared to a net loss of $11.8 million, or $0.17 loss per share, for the same period in 2014. [More]
New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research from Sweden published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that serious life events (SLEs) in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce/separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family, can triple the risk of subsequently developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
Prenatal antidepressant exposure increases anxiety symptoms

Prenatal antidepressant exposure increases anxiety symptoms

Three-year-old siblings exposed to antidepressants in pregnancy show increased anxiety symptoms compared to their unexposed siblings. [More]
High status gestures assumed to stimulate psychological, physiological processes

High status gestures assumed to stimulate psychological, physiological processes

Hands pressed to the hips or perhaps leaning back with arms crossed behind the head are typical poses of power. Referred to power poses or high status gestures in technical jargon, they are assumed to stimulate both psychological and physiological processes. [More]
Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Greening vacant lots may be associated with biologic reductions in stress, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents who walked near newly greened vacant lots had significantly lower heart rates compared to walking near a blighted, or neglected, vacant lot. [More]
Visual cues associated with overweight can influence one's sense of smell

Visual cues associated with overweight can influence one's sense of smell

Could our reaction to an image of an overweight or obese person affect how we perceive odor? A trio of researchers, including two from UCLA, says yes. [More]
Blunted cortisol response common in non-classic CAH

Blunted cortisol response common in non-classic CAH

Nearly two-thirds of children with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia have an inadequate cortisol response, report researchers. [More]
Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood, accompanied by temporary pre-diabetic conditions in healthy young men, according to new research published online February 19, 2015, in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. [More]
Researchers develop artificial adrenal system in animal model

Researchers develop artificial adrenal system in animal model

If the function of the adrenal gland is disturbed it does not produce enough stress-adjusting messengers. The results are serious and cause life-threatening diseases. Under the direction of Prof. Dr. Stefan R. Bornstein of the university hospital Carl Gustav Carus researchers developed an artificial adrenal system together with the medicine Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Dr. Andrew Schally in an animal model. [More]
Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Cushing Disease, not to be confused with Cushing's Syndrome, is caused by a tumour in the pituitary gland in the brain. The tumour secrets increased amounts of the stress hormone adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) followed by cortisol release from the adrenal glands leading to rapid weight gain, elevated blood pressure and muscular weakness. [More]
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