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Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

A minor hiccup in the sequence of a human gene can have devastating impacts on health. Such flaws cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease affecting the lungs and other vital organs, often leading to death by the age of 30. [More]
Liquid biopsies may be effective option for detecting mutations in advanced lung cancer patients

Liquid biopsies may be effective option for detecting mutations in advanced lung cancer patients

For patients with advanced lung cancer, a non-invasive liquid biopsy may be a more effective and suitable alternative to the gold standard tissue biopsy to detect clinically relevant mutations and help guide their course of treatment, suggests a new study published this week in the journal Clinical Cancer Research from researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Manchester experts develop world’s first Fungal Microscopy online course

Manchester experts develop world’s first Fungal Microscopy online course

Scientists estimate that of the 5 million fungus species on Earth around 600 cause disease in humans. It is a challenge to diagnose a serious fungal infection in real time and this course is aimed at teaching a rapid method of diagnosis. [More]

Separation Technology shifts manufacturing and operations facility from Sanford to Boerne, Texas

EKF Diagnostics, the global in-vitro diagnostics company, announces that Separation Technology, Inc., a subsidiary of EKF, has moved its manufacturing and operations from Sanford, Florida to Boerne, Texas. [More]
Novel Trojan Horse antibody strategy may target Ebola's Achilles' heel

Novel Trojan Horse antibody strategy may target Ebola's Achilles' heel

In research published online today in Science, a team of scientists describe a new therapeutic strategy to target a hidden Achilles' heel shared by all known types of Ebola virus. [More]
New computer program can predict underlying genomics of ER+ breast cancer

New computer program can predict underlying genomics of ER+ breast cancer

The number of tubules in tumors may predict which women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer will benefit from hormone therapy alone and which require chemotherapy, researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found. [More]
Researchers develop novel label-free method for detecting real-time DNA amplification

Researchers develop novel label-free method for detecting real-time DNA amplification

Research team led by Nagoya University develop a label-free method for detecting DNA amplification in real time based on refractive index changes in diffracted light. [More]
New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

Most people have never heard of mastocytosis. It's a rare, sometimes deadly, immune disorder. Now new research may help those with advanced mastocytosis and possibly many more people, too. [More]
Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Sepsis, according to the new clinical definition of sepsis, is organ dysfunction caused by the body’s dysregulated response to an infection. Sepsis is common, with about 20 million patients/year in the developed world. It can escalate to septic shock, which is a life-threatening condition with a mortality rate of about 40%. In fact, about every second someone in the world dies of sepsis. [More]
Edinburgh Research & Innovation announces new AIMday programme to tackle challenges of infectious diseases

Edinburgh Research & Innovation announces new AIMday programme to tackle challenges of infectious diseases

With viruses such as Ebola, MERS-CoV and Zika making global headlines, and the progressive development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) worldwide, Edinburgh Research & Innovation (ERI), the commercialisation arm of the University of Edinburgh, has announced a new AIMday (Academic Industry Meeting day) for companies looking to find expertise and innovative solutions to dealing with the challenges of microbial infection. [More]
Low levels of diastolic blood pressure linked to heart damage risk

Low levels of diastolic blood pressure linked to heart damage risk

By analyzing medical records gathered over three decades on more than 11,000 Americans participating in a federally funded study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have more evidence that driving diastolic blood pressure too low is associated with damage to heart tissue. [More]
Sign language may be highly effective in treating children with apraxia of speech

Sign language may be highly effective in treating children with apraxia of speech

Using sign language with intensive speech therapy may be an effective treatment for children with a rare speech disorder called apraxia of speech, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Scientists find way to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to diagnose and inactivate cancer mutations

Scientists find way to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to diagnose and inactivate cancer mutations

As for many other biomedical and biotechnology disciplines, the genome scissor "CRISPR/Cas9" also opens up completely new possibilities for cancer research. [More]
Nutrition could be cost-effective treatment to improve health in malnourished older adults

Nutrition could be cost-effective treatment to improve health in malnourished older adults

As a majority of older adults have two or more chronic conditions, finding new ways to improve their health and decrease the cost of care is vital to helping them live healthier, longer lives. [More]
Platelet function testing in elderly patients after heart attack shows no improved outcomes

Platelet function testing in elderly patients after heart attack shows no improved outcomes

Monitoring platelet function in order to individualize antiplatelet therapy did not improve outcomes for elderly patients after a heart attack compared to a standard, unmonitored approach, results of the ANTARCTIC trial show. [More]
NEJM publishes MINDACT trial results

NEJM publishes MINDACT trial results

Agendia, Inc., a world leader in personalized medicine and molecular cancer diagnostics, announces the peer-reviewed publication of the primary outcome results of the Microarray In Node-negative and 1 to 3 positive lymph node Disease may Avoid ChemoTherapy (MINDACT) clinical trial in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). (i, iii, iv) The publication demonstrates that 46% of breast cancer patients considered for chemotherapy, whose tumors are classified MammaPrint Low Risk, have excellent survival without chemotherapy, and can thus be candidates to avoid this toxic therapy. [More]
Scientists isolate new multicomponent virus from mosquitoes

Scientists isolate new multicomponent virus from mosquitoes

Scientists have identified a new "multicomponent" virus -- one containing different segments of genetic material in separate particles -- that can infect animals, according to research published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
Curbing immune system infighting could make treatment more effective for pancreatic cancer

Curbing immune system infighting could make treatment more effective for pancreatic cancer

Internal conflict between cell types explains why the immune system struggles to recognize and attack pancreatic cancer. [More]
Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
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