Diagnostics News and Research RSS Feed - Diagnostics News and Research

Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today announced results from a new study that demonstrated the ability of the myRisk Hereditary Cancer test to detect 105 percent more mutations in cancer causing genes than conventional BRCA testing alone. The Company also presented two key studies in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that show the myChoice HRD test accurately predicted response to platinum-based therapy in patients with early-stage TNBC and that the BRACAnalysis molecular diagnostic test significantly predicted response to platinum-based drugs in patients with metastatic TNBC. [More]
E-cigarettes not as addictive as tobacco cigarettes

E-cigarettes not as addictive as tobacco cigarettes

E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes in former smokers and this could help improve understanding of how various nicotine delivery devices lead to dependence, according to researchers. [More]
Focus Diagnostics' Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV Direct Kit receive FDA clearance

Focus Diagnostics' Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV Direct Kit receive FDA clearance

As the 2014-2015 flu season begins, Focus Diagnostics, the products business of Quest Diagnostics, today announced that its Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV Direct Kit has received FDA clearance for eight additional influenza strains. These strains may pose significant potential health risks and may be circulating this winter. [More]
Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test receives CLIA Waiver from FDA

Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test receives CLIA Waiver from FDA

Alere Inc., a global leader in rapid diagnostic tests, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments) Waiver for the Alere Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test. [More]
Researchers test new nanopore DNA sequencing technology to detect cause of antibiotic resistance

Researchers test new nanopore DNA sequencing technology to detect cause of antibiotic resistance

New nanopore DNA sequencing technology on a device the size of a USB stick could be used to diagnose infection - according to new research from the University of East Anglia and Public Health England. [More]
Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Nine groups of scientists will receive funding totaling $5.9 million in 2014 to work together on increasing the understanding of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the leading cause of death from epilepsy. The consortium becomes the second Center Without Walls, an initiative to speed the pace of research on difficult problems in epilepsy by promoting collaborative research. [More]
Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve selected to lead $27.3 million international effort to identify causes of SUDEP

Case Western Reserve is one of two universities in the country selected to lead a $27.3 million international effort to identify the causes of a mysterious and deadly phenomenon that strikes people with epilepsy without warning. [More]
Screening system spots cancerous changes invisible to sequencing

Screening system spots cancerous changes invisible to sequencing

A technique that can identify causes of cancer invisible to genetic sequencing has uncovered large sets of previously unknown pancreatic cancer genes. It is hoped that this study will boost research into a disease that is still poorly understood and for which five-year survival rates have stood at around 5 per cent for the past four decades. [More]
New advancement in biomedical research could help tackle diseases associated with ageing

New advancement in biomedical research could help tackle diseases associated with ageing

A new advance in biomedical research at the University of Leicester could have potential in the future to assist with tackling diseases and conditions associated with ageing - as well as in treating cancer. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals CEO honored with SCRIP Lifetime Achievement Award

Isis Pharmaceuticals CEO honored with SCRIP Lifetime Achievement Award

Stanley T. Crooke, Ph.D., M.D., founder, CEO and chairman of the board of directors of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., has been awarded the 2014 SCRIP Lifetime Achievement Award, one of the most prestigious of its kind in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries worldwide. [More]
Two medical imaging techniques could predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Two medical imaging techniques could predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Two medical imaging techniques, called positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT), could be used in combination as a biomarker to predict the effectiveness of antibiotic drug regimens being tested to treat tuberculosis (TB) patients, according to researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Landmark CoMMpass Study data now available through MMRF Researcher Gateway

Landmark CoMMpass Study data now available through MMRF Researcher Gateway

The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation announced today that new data from the landmark CoMMpass Study is now available to researchers via the MMRF's Researcher Gateway, an online, open-access portal designed to make key genomic and clinical data publically available for additional study. [More]
Phase IIb trial shows platinum-resistant ovarian patients treated with PM1183 live longer

Phase IIb trial shows platinum-resistant ovarian patients treated with PM1183 live longer

Zeltia announces today that its pharmaceutical division PharmaMar has data from a group of 33 randomized patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer demonstrating that PM1183 shows a significantly superior median overall survival compared to topotecan. [More]
Disease-associated malnutrition imposes economic burden on society

Disease-associated malnutrition imposes economic burden on society

Even in food-abundant industrialized countries like the U.S., an alarming number of people, particularly seniors, are in a state of diseased-associated malnutrition. Because of the impact on patient health, disease-associated malnutrition imposes a significant economic burden on society of $157 billion per year, according to new research published in a supplemental issue of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and supported by Abbott. [More]
New light-triggered strategy can provide accurate control over aptamer-based therapeutics

New light-triggered strategy can provide accurate control over aptamer-based therapeutics

While aptamers—single-stranded nucleic acids—offer promise as drug-delivery tools for cancer treatment, it has proven difficult to get them to tumor cells at therapeutic levels. [More]
Leica Biosystems completes acquisition of Devicor Medical Products

Leica Biosystems completes acquisition of Devicor Medical Products

Leica Biosystems, a global leader in anatomic pathology laboratory solutions and instruments, announced today that it has successfully completed its previously announced acquisition of Devicor Medical Products, Inc. [More]
Protein that regulates the body's sleep cycle may offer cancer protection

Protein that regulates the body's sleep cycle may offer cancer protection

People who work around the clock could actually be setting themselves back, according to Virginia Tech biologists. [More]
New NHLBI grant to support development of prevention strategies for deadly heart condition

New NHLBI grant to support development of prevention strategies for deadly heart condition

One of medicine's most prominent experts in sudden cardiac arrest has received a new $2.36 million grant to study how to better predict the deadly heart condition that kills an estimated 300,000 Americans each year. [More]
Scientists develop system for printing protein patterns onto film

Scientists develop system for printing protein patterns onto film

Protein-coated Petri dishes are increasingly being used to support cell growth during cell cultivation. Scientists have developed a system for printing protein patterns onto film using a roll-to-roll process, which allows high volumes to be manufactured efficiently and cost-effectively. [More]
Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical LLC today announced it will receive an issued patent from the US Patent and Trademark Office for its groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope, the most significant advancement to the stethoscope in half a century. [More]