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NIH Collaboratory provides guide to success for pragmatic clinical trials

NIH Collaboratory provides guide to success for pragmatic clinical trials

Pragmatic clinical trials--real-life tests done in real-world settings--are increasingly important for answering pressing questions about how best to deliver health care. But these pragmatic trials require close collaboration between two professional groups who often have contrasting styles. One group is researchers, who follow structure like classical musicians. The other is and health care providers and administrators, who may need to improvise like jazz musicians. [More]
Genetics may play major role in Lou Gehrig's disease, study reveals

Genetics may play major role in Lou Gehrig's disease, study reveals

Genetics may play a larger role in causing Lou Gehrig's disease than previously believed, potentially accounting for more than one-third of all cases, according to one of the most comprehensive genetic studies to date of patients who suffer from the condition also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease starts in pregnancy

Risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease starts in pregnancy

The risk of developing type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease is affected by exposures in the uterus. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden are now calling for updated guidelines in light of research evidence from the past decades. [More]
Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Individuals conceived in the severe Dutch Famine, also called the Hunger Winter, may have adjusted to this horrendous period of World War II by making adaptations to how active their DNA is. Genes involved in growth and development were differentially regulated, according to researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center, Harvard University, and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]

Thomson Reuters, Linguamatics launch Cortellis Informatics Clinical Text Analytics for I2E

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters, the world leader in intelligent information for businesses and professionals, today announced a collaboration with Linguamatics to advance pharmaceutical clinical trial research and development (R&D) with the launch of Cortellis Informatics Clinical Text Analytics for I2E. [More]
Study: Common prostate cancer therapy exposes low-risk patients to more adverse side effects

Study: Common prostate cancer therapy exposes low-risk patients to more adverse side effects

A common prostate cancer therapy should not be used in men whose cancer has not spread beyond the prostate, according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. [More]
‘Landmark’ study confirms aetiology effect on epilepsy mortality risk

‘Landmark’ study confirms aetiology effect on epilepsy mortality risk

A “landmark” meta-analysis confirms the increased mortality risk in patients who have symptomatic or cryptogenic epilepsy. [More]
Research findings have major implications for public dental health resources, costs for patients

Research findings have major implications for public dental health resources, costs for patients

The latest research from the University of Adelaide challenges current thinking on whether many people with tooth loss really need dentures. [More]
Young adults who skip college are at higher risk for nonmedical prescription opioid use

Young adults who skip college are at higher risk for nonmedical prescription opioid use

A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health compared the use of prescription opioids and stimulants among high school graduates, non-graduates, and their college-attending peers, and found that young adults who do not attend college are at particularly high risk for nonmedical prescription opioid use and disorder. [More]
People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Prostate cancer patients with life expectancies of less than 10 years receive aggressive treatment

Prostate cancer patients with life expectancies of less than 10 years receive aggressive treatment

National guidelines recommend that men with low- and intermediate -risk prostate cancer and life expectancies of less than 10 years should not be treated with radiation or surgery, since they are unlikely to live long enough to benefit from treatment. Yet it is unknown whether such men are unnecessarily receiving these aggressive local treatments, putting them at risk for potentially debilitating side effects. [More]
Researchers identify infection control gaps as major culprit in spread of MERS-CoV

Researchers identify infection control gaps as major culprit in spread of MERS-CoV

Little is known about the often fatal virus known as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), but researchers have identified gaps in infection control as a major culprit in all eleven published cases involving healthcare-associated transmission of the virus. [More]
Greater income inequality associated with more deaths among African Americans

Greater income inequality associated with more deaths among African Americans

Greater income inequality is linked to more deaths among African Americans, but the effect is reversed among white Americans, who experienced fewer deaths, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Researchers dismiss causal link between antibiotics treatment and childhood asthma

Researchers dismiss causal link between antibiotics treatment and childhood asthma

In a new register study in the scientific journal BMJ, researchers at Karolinska Institutet are able to dismiss previous claims that there is a link between the increased use of antibiotics in society and a coinciding rise in childhood asthma. The study includes half a million children and shows that exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy or early in life does not appear to increase the risk of asthma. [More]
Leading experts to discuss specific strategies to combat Ebola

Leading experts to discuss specific strategies to combat Ebola

Where do we stand in the fight against Ebola -- and what should be done now? [More]
Rate of toy-related injuries in children increases nearly 40% from 1990 through 2011

Rate of toy-related injuries in children increases nearly 40% from 1990 through 2011

'Tis the season for toys. Children are writing lists full of them, and parents are standing in lines (or tapping on computers) trying to find them. Playing with toys this season or any other is an important way for children to develop, learn, and explore. But anyone planning to buy new toys, or anyone with toys already at home, should know that many toys pose an injury risk to children. [More]
Study finds striking gap in cancer survival between countries and regions

Study finds striking gap in cancer survival between countries and regions

The CONCORD-2 study, published in The Lancet, reports 5-year survival estimates for 25·7 million cancer patients diagnosed with one of 10 common cancers and 75 000 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia between 1995 and 2009, using individual patient data from 279 cancer registries in 67 countries. [More]
Better evidence needed for relationship between exercise and COPD

Better evidence needed for relationship between exercise and COPD

Researchers call for high-quality studies investigating the relationship between physical activity and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after their systematic review found the level of evidence to be poor. [More]
Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Removing ovaries at hysterectomy does not increase a woman's risk of pelvic organ prolapse after menopause. In fact, removing ovaries lowers the risk of prolapse. This surprising finding from a Women's Health Initiative study was published online this week in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Barriers to sharing of public health data hinder decision-making efforts

Barriers to sharing of public health data hinder decision-making efforts

Barriers to the sharing of public health data hamper decision-making efforts on local, national and global levels, and stymie attempts to contain emerging global health threats, an international team led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health announced today. [More]