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UMMS, UMMSM researchers identify key genetic pathway underlying bipolar disorder

UMMS, UMMSM researchers identify key genetic pathway underlying bipolar disorder

A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have identified what is likely a key genetic pathway underlying bipolar (manic depressive) disorder, a breakthrough that could lead to better drugs for treating bipolar affective disorder, as well as depression and other related mood disorders. [More]
Childhood obesity rates still high in Ireland and may begin to fall, say researchers

Childhood obesity rates still high in Ireland and may begin to fall, say researchers

Childhood overweight and obesity rates have plateaued in primary school aged children in the Republic of Ireland, reveals research published today in the open access journal BMC Public Health. The study found that although obesity rates remain high, there is evidence that they have stabilised and may be beginning to fall. [More]
Social networking strategies encourage more at risk people to get tested for HIV

Social networking strategies encourage more at risk people to get tested for HIV

Old-school face-to-face social networking is a more effective way to identify people with HIV than the traditional referral method, suggests research being presented at IDWeek 2014. [More]
Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Some cancers, like breast and prostate cancer, are driven by hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, but to date, there are none that are driven by the lack of a hormone. New evidence suggests that human colon cells may become cancerous when they lose the ability to produce a hormone that helps the cells maintain normal biology. If verified by further studies, it suggests that treating patients at high risk for colon cancer by replacing the hormone guanylin could prevent the development of cancer. [More]
Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

The pneumococcal vaccine recommended for young children not only prevents illness and death, but also has dramatically reduced severe antibiotic-resistant infections, suggests nationwide research being presented at IDWeek 2014. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
Vancomycin drug still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections

Vancomycin drug still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections

A University of Nebraska Medical Center research team has determined that a longtime antibiotic, vancomycin, is still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections and that physicians should continue to use the drug even though several newer antibiotics are now available in the marketplace. [More]
Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity

Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity

Known cancer-driving genomic aberrations in localized lung cancer appear to be so consistently present across tumors that a single biopsy of one region of the tumor is likely to identify most of them, according to a paper published today in Science. [More]
Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014-. [More]
Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Hospitalized children go home sooner and are less likely to be readmitted when the hospital has an antibiotic stewardship program that's dedicated to controlling antibiotic prescriptions and treatment, according to a study being presented at IDWeek 2014-. The study is the first to show the benefits of such programs on children's health. [More]
RBX2660 drug candidate highly effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

RBX2660 drug candidate highly effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

Rebiotix Inc. announced today that results of the Phase 2 PUNCH CD Study found that the overall efficacy of RBX2660 in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection was 87.1%. The study also found that administration of RBX2660 was well-tolerated and demonstrated satisfactory safety in the 60-day interim analysis. [More]
Conventional laparoscopy less complicated than robot-assisted surgery for benign gynecologic conditions

Conventional laparoscopy less complicated than robot-assisted surgery for benign gynecologic conditions

For benign gynecologic conditions, robot-assisted surgery involves more complications during surgery and may be significantly more expensive than conventional laparoscopic surgery, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Hospital patients may be at significant risk of infection due to poor hand hygiene

Hospital patients may be at significant risk of infection due to poor hand hygiene

Health technology company Infonaut, a MaRS client, has released a study showing that hospital patients may be at significant risk of infection due to their own poor hand hygiene. [More]
Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Nursing home infection rates are on the rise, a study from Columbia University School of Nursing found, suggesting that more must be done to protect residents of these facilities from preventable complications. The study, which examined infections in U.S. nursing homes over a five-year period, found increased infection rates for pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs), viral hepatitis, septicemia, wound infections, and multiple drug-resistant organisms (MDROs). [More]
Isavuconazole demonstrates successful outcomes in treatment of mucormycosis

Isavuconazole demonstrates successful outcomes in treatment of mucormycosis

Astellas reported today that isavuconazole demonstrated successful outcomes in the treatment of mucormycosis according to data from the phase 3 isavuconazole VITAL study being presented at IDWeek on October 10, 2014, in Philadelphia, Pa. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, clearly defined the epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which occur primarily in the lining of the stomach and small intestine. [More]
Study finds that hospitalized patients wash their hands infrequently

Study finds that hospitalized patients wash their hands infrequently

Hospital visitors and staff are greeted with hand sanitizer dispensers in the lobby, by the elevators and outside rooms as reminders to wash their hands to stop infections, but just how clean are patients' hands? [More]
Nurse-led intervention program fails to improve 30-day hospital readmission rates

Nurse-led intervention program fails to improve 30-day hospital readmission rates

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that a nurse-led intervention program designed to reduce readmissions among ethnically and linguistically diverse older patients did not improve 30-day hospital readmission rates. Their findings suggest hospitals evaluate such programs before implementing or continuing. [More]
TRU-D SmartUVC’s Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot to be showcased at IDWeek 2014

TRU-D SmartUVC’s Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot to be showcased at IDWeek 2014

TRU-D SmartUVC LLC will feature its Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot at IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia this week from October 8 to 12 at booth 826. [More]