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Regular physical activity decreases risk for invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal women

Regular physical activity decreases risk for invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal women

Postmenopausal women who in the past four years had undertaken regular physical activity equivalent to at least four hours of walking per week had a lower risk for invasive breast cancer compared with women who exercised less during those four years, according to data published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Frequent marijuana use can have negative effect on brains of teenagers

Frequent marijuana use can have negative effect on brains of teenagers

Frequent marijuana use can have a significant negative effect on the brains of teenagers and young adults, including cognitive decline, poor attention and memory, and decreased IQ, according to psychologists discussing public health implications of marijuana legalization at the American Psychological Association's 122nd Annual Convention. [More]

Brushing advice given by dental associations is unacceptably inconsistent

Advice on how we should brush our teeth from dental associations and toothpaste companies is 'unacceptably inconsistent', finds new UCL (University College London) research. [More]
Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Workplace stress can have a range of adverse effects on health with an increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in the first line. [More]
Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. [More]
Weight loss improves physical health, but takes toll on mental health

Weight loss improves physical health, but takes toll on mental health

Weight loss significantly improves physical health but effects on mental health are less straightforward, finds new UCL research funded by Cancer Research UK. [More]
Mutations in CTR9 gene cause rare cases of Wilms tumour in children

Mutations in CTR9 gene cause rare cases of Wilms tumour in children

Mutations in a gene that helps regulate when genes are switched on and off in cells have been found to cause rare cases of Wilms tumour, the most common kidney cancer occurring in children. [More]
Gut microbiome analysis has potential to be a new tool for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening

Gut microbiome analysis has potential to be a new tool for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening

Analysis of the gut microbiome more successfully distinguished healthy individuals from those with precancerous adenomatous polyps and those with invasive colorectal cancer compared with assessment of clinical risk factors and fecal occult blood testing, according to data published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Wellness coaching improves quality of life, mood and perceived stress

Wellness coaching improves quality of life, mood and perceived stress

Wellness coaching has become an increasingly prevalent strategy to help individuals improve their health and well-being. Recently, wellness coaching was found to improve quality of life, mood and perceived stress, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy have declined nationally but still vary substantially across U.S. states, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. [More]
9.3% of U.S. cancer survivors are current smokers, shows study

9.3% of U.S. cancer survivors are current smokers, shows study

Nine years after diagnosis, 9.3 percent of U.S. cancer survivors were current smokers and 83 percent of these individuals were daily smokers who averaged 14.7 cigarettes per day, according to a report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). [More]
Experts explain pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes

Experts explain pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes

Enzyme supplements available without a prescription are becoming increasingly popular, but should everyone add them to their shopping list? Brent Bauer, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, is co-author of a new paper in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on the pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes. [More]
Hepatitis C could become a rare disease by 2036

Hepatitis C could become a rare disease by 2036

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The results of the simulation are reported in the August 5 edition of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Frontiers launches Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine journal

Frontiers launches Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine journal

Swiss open-access publisher Frontiers, part of the Nature Publishing Group family, is pleased to announce the launch of Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, a new open-access medical journal. [More]
Herpes zoster vaccine effective in protecting older adults against shingles, even after chemotherapy

Herpes zoster vaccine effective in protecting older adults against shingles, even after chemotherapy

The herpes zoster vaccine continues to be effective in protecting older adults against shingles, even after they undergo chemotherapy, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
New, promising approach combines metformin and SGLT2 inhibitors to treat diabetes

New, promising approach combines metformin and SGLT2 inhibitors to treat diabetes

Various active substances in oral antidiabetic agents are frequently combined in the treatment of diabetes in order to achieve an effective reduction in the blood sugar. A new, very promising approach combines the substances metformin and SGLT2 inhibitors, the latter were just approved in 2012. [More]
Study shows new potential mechanism to better understand AD in African Americans

Study shows new potential mechanism to better understand AD in African Americans

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that two rare variants in the AKAP9 gene significantly increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in African-Americans. [More]
Scientists shed new light on why teenagers are susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia

Scientists shed new light on why teenagers are susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia

University of York scientists have shed new light on why teenagers and young adults are particularly susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia. [More]
People with family incarcerations in their youth are more likely as adults to engage in smoking

People with family incarcerations in their youth are more likely as adults to engage in smoking

New research shows that people who grew up in a household where a member was incarcerated have a 16-percent greater risk of experiencing poor health quality than adults who did not have a family member sent to prison. [More]
Returning National Guardsmen more likely to turn to alcohol when faced with issues at home

Returning National Guardsmen more likely to turn to alcohol when faced with issues at home

Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems-all commonplace in military families. [More]