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Low-dose aspirin not significantly associated with pregnancy loss

Low-dose aspirin not significantly associated with pregnancy loss

The Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction (EAGeR) medical trial has found that, in general, low-dose aspirin is not beneficial for future pregnancy outcomes in women with prior pregnancy loss. [More]

Staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients

The probability of staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients who already have been disease-free for a period of time, and time elapsed since remission should be taken into account when making follow-up care decisions, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

Variations in woman's genome may contribute to her risk of developing ovarian cancer

Variations in a woman's genome may contribute to her risk of developing ovarian cancer. Researchers using data collected by the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium have discovered uncommon variants in new regions of the genome that influence ovarian cancer risk, and will present their findings on April 6, 2014 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA. [More]
Recommended daily sodium intake harmful for health, study finds

Recommended daily sodium intake harmful for health, study finds

A new study published in the American Journal of Hypertension finds evidence that the average daily sodium intake of most Americans is actually associated with better health outcomes than intake levels currently recommended by the CDC and major health departments, which are now being viewed by many in the scientific community as excessively and unrealistically low. [More]
Research shows that use of fertility drugs does not increase breast cancer risk

Research shows that use of fertility drugs does not increase breast cancer risk

Women who took clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins as a part of fertility treatment did not experience an increased risk for breast cancer over 30 years of follow-up, compared with women who were not treated with these medications, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Study: Good diet means healthy population with lower health costs

Study: Good diet means healthy population with lower health costs

The idea that a good diet means a healthy population with lower health costs only holds true when it comes to emergency care, a study shows. [More]
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of Adacel® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]
Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

​There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction - ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Study shows link between breast-feeding and risk of child developing obesity

Study shows link between breast-feeding and risk of child developing obesity

Many studies have focused on the influence of breast-feeding on child health. From analysis of data from the ELANCE cohort, Marie Fran-oise Rolland-Cachera, former researcher at Inserm and her co-workers in the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN) have shown that breast-feeding has a protective effect on the risk of obesity at 20 years of age. [More]

Research uncovers link between diet and blood cell markers of heart attack associated inflammation

New research further illuminates the heart-healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet, tying the eating plan to lower levels of platelets and white blood cells, two markers of inflammation. Inflammation has an association with greater risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]

Perioperative aspirin increases risk of serious bleeding after non-heart-related surgery

​Patients given aspirin to prevent heart problems after non-heart-related surgery had a higher risk of serious bleeding than the patients who did not receive aspirin. [More]

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with such cardiac risk factors as high blood pressure and elevated glucose levels have significantly worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a new study by dementia researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Carb breakdown gene linked to obesity, researchers find

Carb breakdown gene linked to obesity, researchers find

Researchers at King's College London and Imperial College London have discovered that people with fewer copies of a gene coding for a carb-digesting enzyme may be at higher risk of obesity. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, suggest that dietary advice may need to be more tailored to an individual's digestive system, based on whether they have the genetic predisposition and necessary enzymes to digest different foods. [More]
New high-risk cancer causing mutation identified for melanoma development

New high-risk cancer causing mutation identified for melanoma development

Researchers have discovered that mutations in a specific gene are responsible for a hereditary form of melanoma. [More]

Study explores effect of child obesity intervention programs on blood pressure

One of the serious health consequences of obesity is elevated blood pressure (BP), a particular problem in children because research has found that high BP in children usually follows them into adulthood, carrying with it a wide range of possible negative consequences. [More]

UCL partners with Novo Nordisk to fight urban diabetes

UCL is partnering with Novo Nordisk and the Steno Diabetes Center - a world leading institution in diabetes care and prevention - to launch the Cities Changing Diabetes initiative, an ambitious new partnership programme to fight urban diabetes. [More]
Research: Underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does

Research: Underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does

Being underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does, new research has found. The connection between being underweight and the higher risk of dying is true for both adults and fetuses. [More]

New biomarker test accurately estimates mortality risk in patients with septicemia

Septic shock is a severe systemic infection and major cause of death for the old and young alike. Unfortunately, researchers say testing new drug regimens to stop the infection is confounded because clinical trials include patients who are either too sick to be saved by experimental therapies or not sick enough to warrant the treatments. [More]
SAGE Therapeutics doses first patient in SAGE-547 Phase 1/2 trial for treatment of SRSE

SAGE Therapeutics doses first patient in SAGE-547 Phase 1/2 trial for treatment of SRSE

SAGE Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel medicines to treat life-threatening and rare central nervous system (CNS) disorders, today announced dose initiation of the first patient in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of SAGE-547, a neuroactive steroid, in super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE), a critical condition in which the brain is in a state of persistent seizure. [More]