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Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Researchers from the University of Georgia have determined that various freshwater sources in Georgia, such as rivers and lakes, could feature levels of salmonella that pose a risk to humans. [More]
Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Recent years have seen an unprecedented growth in number and availability of new synthetic psychoactive drugs in the US and worldwide. In 2014, 101 new psychoactive drugs were identified, worldwide. Such drugs are often sold as "legal" highs or "research chemicals" over the internet or in head shops. Among these new drugs, "bath salts" appear to be one of the more commonly used in the US. [More]
Researchers identify gene that underlies thinking skills

Researchers identify gene that underlies thinking skills

An international team of researchers, including investigators from the University of Mississippi Medical Center, has identified a gene that underlies healthy information processing -- a first step on a complicated road to understand cognitive aging and age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Three Wishes Project brings peace to critically ill patients and their families

Three Wishes Project brings peace to critically ill patients and their families

Asking for and honouring last wishes helps to create meaning, memories and closure at death, and personalizes the dying process for patients and their families, says a new study led by a McMaster University professor. [More]
Study: Breast cancer survivors experience post-treatment weight gain compared with cancer-free peers

Study: Breast cancer survivors experience post-treatment weight gain compared with cancer-free peers

Among women with a family history of breast cancer, those diagnosed with breast cancer gained weight at a greater rate compared with cancer-free women of the same age and menopausal status. [More]
NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

A plan to ensure that evidence-based psychosocial interventions are routinely used in clinical practice and made a part of clinical training for mental health professionals was released today by the National Academy of Medicine. [More]
People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in later childhood experience weaker brain connectivity in midlife

People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in later childhood experience weaker brain connectivity in midlife

People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in later childhood have weaker brain connectivity in midlife compared to those who were diagnosed at earlier ages according to a University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences study. [More]
BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

Childhood high blood pressure (HBP) is a serious public health challenge worldwide due to associated increases in risk of end organ damages and correlation with HBP in adulthood. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) has been reported to increase significantly among United States children and adolescents from 1988-1994 to 1999-2008, but little is known about recent trends in BP values and elevated BP. [More]
UTHealth scientist receives $1.9 million from NIH to develop non-antibiotic treatment for C. diff infections

UTHealth scientist receives $1.9 million from NIH to develop non-antibiotic treatment for C. diff infections

Charles Darkoh, Ph.D., a researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, was recently awarded a five-year, $1.9 million R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to develop a non-antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections. [More]
Traumatic spinal cord injuries on the rise among older people

Traumatic spinal cord injuries on the rise among older people

Traumatic spinal cord injuries are increasing with the population, and incidence is higher in older individuals, according to a Vanderbilt study that was published in the June 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]
Fixing up abandoned buildings in inner city can reduce crime, violence

Fixing up abandoned buildings in inner city can reduce crime, violence

Fixing up abandoned buildings in the inner city doesn't just eliminate eyesores, it can also significantly reduce crime and violence, including gun assaults, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Penn's Perelman School of Medicine report in the first study to demonstrate the direct impact of building remediation efforts on crime. T [More]
Researchers find way to measure the aging process in young adults

Researchers find way to measure the aging process in young adults

An international research team from the US, UK, Israel and New Zealand has found a way to measure the aging process in young adults -- a younger population than is usually tested in aging studies. [More]
Mayo Clinic awarded $11 million NCI grant to study survivorship in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Mayo Clinic awarded $11 million NCI grant to study survivorship in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Mayo Clinic announced today that it has received a five-year, $11 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study survivorship in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The Lymphoma Epidemiology of Outcomes Cohort Study will enroll 12,000 patients with NHL. The study will follow these patients for long-term prognosis and survivorship. [More]
Guidelines on children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields confusing for parents

Guidelines on children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields confusing for parents

New research suggests guidelines on children's exposure to radio frequency waves from technology are confusing for parents. [More]
Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

A researcher from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is an integral member of a collaborative group that is the first to explain the mechanisms that the Dengue virus has developed to optimize its ability to cause outbreaks as it travels across the globe to new places and revisits old ones. [More]
Penn biologists reveal recent migratory history of blacklegged ticks in Northeastern United States

Penn biologists reveal recent migratory history of blacklegged ticks in Northeastern United States

Lyme disease cases are on the rise, with diagnoses occurring in areas that were historically Lyme-free. Scientists attribute the spread to the fact that populations of blacklegged ticks, which carry the bacteria that causes the disease, now flourish in areas once thought to be devoid of ticks. [More]
Researchers awarded grant from British Council to reduce burden of infectious disease in Malaysia

Researchers awarded grant from British Council to reduce burden of infectious disease in Malaysia

A group of collaborators led by the University of Southampton have been awarded a British Council Newton Fund Institutional Links Grant to support ground-breaking research towards reducing the burden of infectious disease in Malaysia. [More]
Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much remains unknown about how the benefits arise, and what to expect in different people who exercise to improve their health. To gain a more precise understanding of how exercise improves health and whom it helps most, researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. [More]
Scientists to discuss the possibility of predicting evolution at scientific conference in Portugal

Scientists to discuss the possibility of predicting evolution at scientific conference in Portugal

Is it possible to predict the evolution of the influenza virus? Or how rapidly bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics? Or even how cancer cells spread inside a human being? These are some of the main topics of discussion that bring together renowned scientists from all over the world at the scientific conference "Forecasting evolution?" held at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (FCG; Portugal) from 8th to 11th July. [More]
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