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Glia cells may play role in regulating sugar intake into the brain, experts report

Glia cells may play role in regulating sugar intake into the brain, experts report

Researchers at Technical University of Munich discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process. [More]
Greater screening can help improve colorectal cancer rates among Hispanic men in California

Greater screening can help improve colorectal cancer rates among Hispanic men in California

Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates in California have decreased markedly for men and women in all major racial-ethnic groups since 1990, except for Hispanic men. [More]
New research shows high and low levels of HDL cholesterol may increase risk of early death

New research shows high and low levels of HDL cholesterol may increase risk of early death

Commonly touted as "good cholesterol" for helping to reduce risk of stroke and heart attack, both high and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol may increase a person's risk of premature death, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. [More]
Mayo Clinic launches new blood test that measures plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart disease

Mayo Clinic launches new blood test that measures plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart disease

Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). [More]
Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV, and providing therapy for both illnesses simultaneously saves lives - according to new guidelines on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB developed jointly by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Infectious Diseases Society of America. [More]
Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. [More]
New study shows previous estimates significantly underreported maternal mortality rates in the U.S.

New study shows previous estimates significantly underreported maternal mortality rates in the U.S.

Despite the United Nations Millennium Development Goal of a 75 percent reduction in maternal deaths by 2015, the estimated maternal mortality rate for 48 U.S. states and the District of Columbia actually increased by 26.6 percent from 2000 to 2014, according to a new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Warmer climate may reduce incidence of dengue

Warmer climate may reduce incidence of dengue

Health researchers predict that the transmission of dengue could decrease in a future warmer climate, countering previous projections that climate change would cause the potentially lethal virus to spread more easily. [More]
Study finds positive link between planned home births and breast feeding

Study finds positive link between planned home births and breast feeding

A new study by academics in Trinity College Dublin has found that there is a strong positive relationship between planned birth at home and breast feeding: breastfeeding was twice as likely after planned home births compared to hospital births. [More]
Study finds high rates of increasing obesity in patients with history of cancer

Study finds high rates of increasing obesity in patients with history of cancer

A study at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health showed that obesity was more prevalent in patients with a history of cancer than in the general population, and survivors of colorectal and breast cancers were particularly affected. [More]
Study recommends LISA ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease in preterm infants

Study recommends LISA ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease in preterm infants

Researchers from McMaster University have evaluated and determined the best ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease, one of the most significant complications in preterm infants. [More]
DASH-style diet could help lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease

DASH-style diet could help lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease

People who ate a diet high in nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables and low in red and processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium were at a significantly lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease over the course of more than two decades, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Geographers use GIS mapping technique to identify socially, medically vulnerable older adults

Geographers use GIS mapping technique to identify socially, medically vulnerable older adults

With a growing aging population in South Florida, a University of Miami geographer who specializes in public health teamed up with geriatricians and other geographers to conduct the first age-adjusted analysis of socially and medically vulnerable older adults in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. [More]
Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

The images are heartbreaking: thousands of infants born with small, misshapen heads, the result of a rare neurological disorder, called microcephaly, which can cause a myriad of intellectual and developmental disabilities. The culprit? Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that has swept through many parts of South America and more recently surfaced in Florida. [More]
Studies show insurance status may impact patients' health outcomes following cancer diagnosis

Studies show insurance status may impact patients' health outcomes following cancer diagnosis

Two new studies indicate that health insurance status may impact patients' health outcomes following a diagnosis of cancer. [More]
Wiley's Zika page offers free access to published content to coincide with events in Brazil

Wiley's Zika page offers free access to published content to coincide with events in Brazil

Wiley has made available all of its published Zika content on one site http://www.wiley.com/go/zika to coincide with events in Brazil, a territory that has seen increased cases of Zika Virus recently. [More]
Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

A new Brown University study projects that increasing the number of Rhode Islanders treated every year for hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) to about 2,000 by 2020 would reduce cases by 90 percent and prevent more than 70 percent of expected liver-related deaths in the state by 2030. [More]
Young children appear to be at great risk of chemical ocular burns

Young children appear to be at great risk of chemical ocular burns

One- and two-year-old children are at the highest risk of burning their eyes with chemicals, despite the long held belief that working-age adults were the most at risk from this type of severe eye injury, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Higher socioeconomic status linked to lower ovarian cancer risk in African American women

Higher socioeconomic status linked to lower ovarian cancer risk in African American women

Higher socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with lower ovarian cancer risk in African American women, according to the results of a study by investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and elsewhere reported online August 3 by the American Journal of Epidemiology. [More]
New Zika cases may help better predict transmission of virus in the U.S, says expert

New Zika cases may help better predict transmission of virus in the U.S, says expert

Following the news that health officials in Florida have confirmed 14 people north of Miami infected with the Zika virus likely contracted it from local mosquitoes, Virginia Tech's Bryan Lewis said the new infections were not altogether surprising. [More]
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