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Benign brain tumors less likely to emerge in people with high blood sugar

Benign brain tumors less likely to emerge in people with high blood sugar

In a surprising twist, benign brain tumors that have previously been tied to obesity and diabetes are less likely to emerge in those with high blood sugar, new research has found. [More]
Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Patients who were asked where they wanted to die upon entering hospice had lower rates of hospitalization at the end of life, as did those in hospices that monitored symptoms more frequently, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
WHO convenes Emergency Committee's 3rd meeting to discuss on Zika virus and associated complications

WHO convenes Emergency Committee's 3rd meeting to discuss on Zika virus and associated complications

On 14 June 2016, the World Health Organization will convene the 3rd meeting of the Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) on Zika and observed increase in neurological disorders and neonatal malformations. [More]
Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

The cancer agency of the World Health Organization says drinking very hot beverages is probably associated with esophageal cancer. [More]
Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Two new studies involving high school football and hockey players indicate wearing a specifically designed compression collar around the neck may prevent or reduce the devastating effects of head collisions in sports. [More]
Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Today leading experts on infectious disease and urinary tract infections (UTIs) will gather in London to discuss the alarming state of antibiotic resistance, and present findings from a landmark study that conclusively shows that cranberries can be a nutritional approach to reducing symptomatic UTIs, and as a result, may be a useful strategy to decrease worldwide use of antibiotics. [More]
Infection prevention bundles effective for reducing CLABSIs in critical care newborns

Infection prevention bundles effective for reducing CLABSIs in critical care newborns

Infection prevention bundles, a package of evidence-based guidelines implemented in unison, are effective for reducing central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI) in critical care newborn infants, according to a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Lack of affordable, accessible adaptive clothing creates barriers for people with disabilities

Lack of affordable, accessible adaptive clothing creates barriers for people with disabilities

The U.S. clothing industry is a multi-billion dollar industry, but for the millions of Americans with disabilities and their families, a lack of options in the apparel industry presents daily challenges. [More]
Screening PSA levels in younger men could accurately predict future risk of prostate cancer

Screening PSA levels in younger men could accurately predict future risk of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been shown to reduce death and the spread of prostate cancer to other parts of the body, but the PSA test remains highly controversial as it frequently leads to over diagnosis and over treatment of men who may not be at risk. [More]
Southern Europe may be at risk of Zika outbreaks during this summer

Southern Europe may be at risk of Zika outbreaks during this summer

Established Aedes-mosquito population could spread the Zika virus in Europe this summer if infected travelers introduce the virus. An analysis of temperatures, vectorial capacity, basic reproductive number (R0), and air traveler flows suggests parts of Southern Europe may be at risk for Zika outbreaks between June and August. [More]
ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

People with type 2 diabetes who intensively controlled their blood sugar level during the landmark Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial Eye Study were found to have cut their risk of diabetic retinopathy in half in a follow-up analysis conducted four years after stopping intensive therapy. [More]
Study shows rheumatologists underestimate disease severity in OA patients

Study shows rheumatologists underestimate disease severity in OA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are more likely to have the impact of their condition underestimated by rheumatologists than patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Lifestyle intervention program can increase physical activity levels of adults at risk for type 2 diabetes

Lifestyle intervention program can increase physical activity levels of adults at risk for type 2 diabetes

Adults at risk for type 2 diabetes or heart disease or both can substantially increase their physical activity levels through participating in a lifestyle intervention program developed at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health for use in community-settings, such as senior centers or worksites. [More]
Study may help identify genetic basis of why some people's brains age better than others

Study may help identify genetic basis of why some people's brains age better than others

More than one thousand people have had their entire genetic make-up decoded as part of a long-term study to gain insight into why some people's brains age better than others. [More]
Researchers find increased cancer incidence among patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Researchers find increased cancer incidence among patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Primary immunodeficiency disorders are a group of more than 300 single gene defects that affect the role of the immune system and prevent it from functioning properly. When Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers evaluated the overall and site-specific incidence of cancer among patients registered in the United States Immune Deficiency Network, they found increased cancer incidence rates among patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases — and, in particular, a significant increase in lymphoma cases. [More]
Higher blood levels of methotrexate impair executive functioning in long-term pediatric ALL survivors

Higher blood levels of methotrexate impair executive functioning in long-term pediatric ALL survivors

Research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital suggests that pediatric leukemia patients exposed to higher concentrations of the chemotherapy drug methotrexate are more likely to struggle with mental flexibility, organization and related skills as long-term survivors. [More]
Delivering genetic test results over the phone may help ease cost, burden for at-risk cancer patients

Delivering genetic test results over the phone may help ease cost, burden for at-risk cancer patients

Delivering genetic test results to patients at risk for cancer-causing genetic mutations over the phone helps to ease cost and transportation burdens and, compared to receiving results in person, does not cause patients additional stress, according to a new study from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania which will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. [More]
Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black cancer patients between ages 15 and 29 may be more likely than same-aged white patients to die of their disease, according to a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
New research reveals advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments

New research reveals advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments

Advances that could change gynecologic cancer standard-of-care treatments are the centerpiece of key studies being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. [More]
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