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Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Nursing home infection rates are on the rise, a study from Columbia University School of Nursing found, suggesting that more must be done to protect residents of these facilities from preventable complications. The study, which examined infections in U.S. nursing homes over a five-year period, found increased infection rates for pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs), viral hepatitis, septicemia, wound infections, and multiple drug-resistant organisms (MDROs). [More]
Isavuconazole demonstrates successful outcomes in treatment of mucormycosis

Isavuconazole demonstrates successful outcomes in treatment of mucormycosis

Astellas reported today that isavuconazole demonstrated successful outcomes in the treatment of mucormycosis according to data from the phase 3 isavuconazole VITAL study being presented at IDWeek on October 10, 2014, in Philadelphia, Pa. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, clearly defined the epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which occur primarily in the lining of the stomach and small intestine. [More]
Study finds that hospitalized patients wash their hands infrequently

Study finds that hospitalized patients wash their hands infrequently

Hospital visitors and staff are greeted with hand sanitizer dispensers in the lobby, by the elevators and outside rooms as reminders to wash their hands to stop infections, but just how clean are patients' hands? [More]
Nurse-led intervention program fails to improve 30-day hospital readmission rates

Nurse-led intervention program fails to improve 30-day hospital readmission rates

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that a nurse-led intervention program designed to reduce readmissions among ethnically and linguistically diverse older patients did not improve 30-day hospital readmission rates. Their findings suggest hospitals evaluate such programs before implementing or continuing. [More]
TRU-D SmartUVC’s Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot to be showcased at IDWeek 2014

TRU-D SmartUVC’s Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot to be showcased at IDWeek 2014

TRU-D SmartUVC LLC will feature its Ebola-killing UVC automated disinfection robot at IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia this week from October 8 to 12 at booth 826. [More]
Penn Medicine to explore therapeutic strategies for HIV positive women at risk of cervical cancer

Penn Medicine to explore therapeutic strategies for HIV positive women at risk of cervical cancer

The introduction of antiretroviral drugs in Botswana over the last two decades has increased the life expectancies of people living with HIV—many of whom are women co-infected with the human papillomavirus virus (HPV)—considerably: from 39 years to the low 60s. As a result, this co-infected group of women is at a much higher risk of developing HPV-associated cervical cancer. [More]
Reducing community transmission is key to containing Ebola outbreaks

Reducing community transmission is key to containing Ebola outbreaks

Reducing community transmission and changing behaviour in communities is key to containing Ebola outbreaks, according to new research into the first known outbreak of the virus in 1976 by researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Doctors prescribe more analgaesia to women than to men, study finds

Regardless of the pain type, age and social class, women are more likely to be prescribed analgaesia than men. This is confirmed by a study conducted by several members of the Research Group on Public Health at the University of Alicante and funded by the Women's Institute, which recently received the XXIV Award of the Spanish Society of Epidemiology for the best original article published in the journal Gaceta Sanitaria in 2013. [More]
Genetic history of HIV finally unravelled

Genetic history of HIV finally unravelled

Research, published today, shows that the HIV pandemic almost certainly began its global spread in the 1920s in Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo. [More]
Researchers analyze incidence of childhood brain tumors

Researchers analyze incidence of childhood brain tumors

Older parents, birth defects, maternal nutrition and childhood exposure to CT scans and pesticides are increasingly being associated with brain tumors in children, according to new research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
Researchers identify biomarker that can predict GS7 prostate cancer patients

Researchers identify biomarker that can predict GS7 prostate cancer patients

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a biomarker living next door to the KLK3 gene that can predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer. [More]
Recommendations for nutritional rickets announced

Recommendations for nutritional rickets announced

New consensus recommendations for the management of nutritional rickets include universal vitamin D supplementation during the first year of life. [More]
Metamark expands prostate cancer test services to include PROGENSAPCA3 assay

Metamark expands prostate cancer test services to include PROGENSAPCA3 assay

Metamark announced today the expansion of its prostate cancer test services to now include the PROGENSA® PCA3 assay, a urine-based test that can help confirm negative prostate biopsies, and ERG, a companion test to the company's existing PTEN assay. [More]
Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero becomes the first winner of Roux Prize

Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero becomes the first winner of Roux Prize

Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero, a Harvard-trained epidemiologist and mayor of Cali, Colombia, is the first winner of the Roux Prize, a new US$100,000 award for turning evidence into health impact and the largest prize of its kind. [More]
Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Public health and safety are threatened by the increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, which now afflicts at least 25 million adults in the U.S., according to the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. Several new studies highlight the destructive nature of obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic disease that increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and depression. [More]
Montefiore-Einstein selected to conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials

Montefiore-Einstein selected to conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been awarded a $3.4 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and research focused on reducing healthcare disparities in cancer care. [More]
LSTM experts use integrated model to assess effects of new diagnostic algorithms for TB

LSTM experts use integrated model to assess effects of new diagnostic algorithms for TB

Experts at LSTM have used a novel modelling approach to project the effects of new diagnostic methods and algorithms for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) recently endorsed by the World Health Organization, looking at the patient, health system and population perspective in Tanzania. [More]
UTHealth researchers awarded $1.3 million grant to study asthma risk in Texas health care workers

UTHealth researchers awarded $1.3 million grant to study asthma risk in Texas health care workers

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health have been awarded a four-year, $1.3 million grant by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to study how the risk of asthma has changed for health care workers in Texas over the last 10 years. [More]