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Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

In a first-of-its-kind analysis of worldwide dietary patterns, a team including researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge found overall diet quality worsened across the world even as consumption of healthier foods increased in many countries. [More]
Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found a possible clue to why older mothers face a higher risk for having babies born with conditions such as Down syndrome that are characterized by abnormal chromosome numbers. [More]
NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis (TB) research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network. [More]
Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has identified the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene as increasing the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Training modules for emergency department staff to treat infectious disease patients available on CDC's website

Training modules for emergency department staff to treat infectious disease patients available on CDC's website

Four Web-based training modules developed by Johns Hopkins Medicine for emergency department personnel who treat patients with infectious diseases are now available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. [More]
Survey finds high levels of abuse, serious harm associated with human trafficking

Survey finds high levels of abuse, serious harm associated with human trafficking

The largest survey to date of the health of trafficking survivors has found high levels of abuse and serious harm associated with human trafficking. For the first time, the findings reveal severe mental and physical health problems experienced by men, women and children trafficked for forced labour and sexual exploitation in Southeast Asia. [More]
Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

A primary care nurse-delivered intervention can lead to sustained increases in physical activity (PA) among older adults, according to an article published by Tess Harris of St George's University of London, and colleagues in this week's PLOS Medicine. The trial was funded by the National Institute for Health Research. [More]
Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. [More]
Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from numerous centers from around the world are gathering at the Cardiology 2015: the 18th Annual Update on Pediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease conference, sponsored by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Phoenix Children's Hospital on Feb. 11 to Feb. 15 in Scottsdale, Ariz. [More]
Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

In a paper just published in the peer reviewed journal Infection, Ecology & Epidemiology, researchers report discovering the first evidence of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) in the wild rat population in the Netherlands. The discovery comes on the heels of similar ones in France, Belgium and the United Kingdom in recent years, and has some researchers concerned about the potential spread of the virus to humans. [More]
Study evaluates recent sleep trends for U.S. adolescents

Study evaluates recent sleep trends for U.S. adolescents

Sufficient sleep is critical for adolescent health, yet the number of hours slept per night has decreased among teenagers in the United States over the last 20 years. A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that female students, racial/ethnic minorities, and students of lower socioeconomic status are particularly affected, with teens in these categories less likely to report regularly getting seven or more hours of sleep each night compared with their male counterparts, non-Hispanic white teenagers, and students of higher socioeconomic status, respectively. [More]
Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts, such as West Nile virus and Ebola, is a predictable result of climate change, says a noted zoologist affiliated with the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. [More]
New electronic model holds promise of revolutionizing shared decision-making in doctor's office

New electronic model holds promise of revolutionizing shared decision-making in doctor's office

Traditional decision aids to help patient-doctor discussions have drawbacks, but a new electronic model developed by McMaster University researchers holds promise of revolutionizing shared decision-making in the doctor's office with the touch of an electronic tablet. [More]
Risk of ovarian cancer increased with even short-term HRT use

Risk of ovarian cancer increased with even short-term HRT use

There has been much uncertainty regarding the risk of cancer associated with taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the menopause. An analysis of all available evidence published in The Lancet today shows that HRT, even when taken for only a few years, significantly increases the risk of developing the two most common types of ovarian cancer. [More]
Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have developed an image-analysis technique that is designed to improve breast cancer detection and diagnosis. [More]
SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics designated as FAO Reference Centre for bioinformatics

SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics designated as FAO Reference Centre for bioinformatics

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has appointed SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics as the FAO Reference Centre for bioinformatics. [More]
Rare and classic EGFR mutations have different impacts on NSCLC outcome

Rare and classic EGFR mutations have different impacts on NSCLC outcome

Certain rare epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are associated with tobacco smoking, worse prognosis and poor response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy compared to the more common "classical" EGFR mutations. [More]
Children exposed to air pollution are at increased risk for brain inflammation, neurodegenerative changes

Children exposed to air pollution are at increased risk for brain inflammation, neurodegenerative changes

City smog lowers children's IQ. This is among findings from a recent University of Montana study that found children living in cities with significant air pollution are at an increased risk for detrimental impacts to the brain, including short-term memory loss and lower IQ. [More]
Experts gather at Cardiology 2015 conference to discuss challenges in treating congenital heart disease

Experts gather at Cardiology 2015 conference to discuss challenges in treating congenital heart disease

Many aspects of pediatric cardiology are relatively new to the discipline. Only recently have physicians been able to accurately diagnose and characterize the myriad congenital cardiovascular conditions that occur and begin to apply successful strategies for care. This week, an international group of more than 800 medical experts gather at the nation's largest pediatric cardiology conference to discuss challenges in treating congenital heart disease in the fetus, neonates, children and young adults. [More]
Cannabis Science highlights more attendees at the CFA African Healthcare Infrastructure Forum and Brainstorm

Cannabis Science highlights more attendees at the CFA African Healthcare Infrastructure Forum and Brainstorm

Cannabis Science, Inc., a U.S. Company specializing in cannabis formulation-based drug development and related consulting, highlights additional attendees at the CFA African Healthcare Infrastructure Forum and Brainstorm held at the African Union, in Washington DC, on February 6, 2015. [More]