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People with high-risk tumors containing BRAF or NRAS gene mutations have lower survival rates

People with high-risk tumors containing BRAF or NRAS gene mutations have lower survival rates

Researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed hundreds of melanoma samples to find out if two genetic mutations more commonly found in melanoma tumors were associated with lower survival rates in patients. [More]
Pediatric melanoma incidence rates decrease from 2004-2010

Pediatric melanoma incidence rates decrease from 2004-2010

Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer that has been increasing in incidence in adults over the past 40 years. Although pediatric melanoma is rare (5-6 children per million), most studies indicate that incidence has been increasing. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that the incidence of pediatric melanoma in the United States actually has decreased from 2004-2010. [More]
Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the western world. A new study published in the Journal of Hepatology shows that exercise, regardless of frequency or intensity, benefits obese and overweight adults with NAFLD. [More]
Study estimates prevalence of treatment-related chronic diseases among childhood cancer survivors

Study estimates prevalence of treatment-related chronic diseases among childhood cancer survivors

The number of childhood cancer survivors in the U.S. has increased, but the majority of those who have survived five or more years after diagnosis face chronic health problems related to their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. [More]
Many women diagnosed with breast cancer concerned about genetic risk of developing other cancers

Many women diagnosed with breast cancer concerned about genetic risk of developing other cancers

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds that many women diagnosed with breast cancer are concerned about the genetic risk of developing other cancers themselves or of a loved one developing cancer. [More]
Researchers identify 22 genetic variations associated with increased risk of prostate cancer

Researchers identify 22 genetic variations associated with increased risk of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer affects one out of every 6 men during their lifetime and is the second most common cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States, resulting in an estimated 27,500 deaths in 2015. Identifying those men who have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer may reduce mortality. [More]
New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data on the harm caused by foodborne illnesses underscore the global threats posed by unsafe foods, and the need for coordinated, cross-border action across the entire food supply chain, according to WHO, which next week is dedicating its annual World Health Day to the issue of food safety. [More]
Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

As the global population pushes past 7 billion and more people reach old age, the number of deaths from cardiovascular diseases is on the rise. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of premature death in the world, include heart attacks, strokes, and other circulatory diseases. [More]
Study: Placenta can be used to measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women, fetuses

Study: Placenta can be used to measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women, fetuses

The placenta can be used to reliably measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women and how much of the toxic metal is transferred to their fetuses, a Dartmouth College study shows. [More]
Increasing Social Security retirement age could bridge income gap

Increasing Social Security retirement age could bridge income gap

The age to receive full Social Security benefits should be closer to 70, according to a report published in the journal Daedalus. [More]
Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

After discovering a unique group of people resistant to tuberculosis (TB) infection, Case Western Reserve researchers are leading an international team dedicated to understanding exactly how they fight off a disease that claims 1.5 million lives each year. [More]
Hospitals, health systems preparing to treat patients with Ebola face unexpected challenges

Hospitals, health systems preparing to treat patients with Ebola face unexpected challenges

Hospitals and health systems preparing for and treating patients with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the fall of 2015 faced unexpected challenges for ensuring safety of staff, patients and the community. The experiences are detailed in two studies published online in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Researchers reveal obstacles that prevent Ugandans with RHD from getting life-saving penicillin

Researchers reveal obstacles that prevent Ugandans with RHD from getting life-saving penicillin

Penicillin has nearly eradicated rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the United States. But 15 million people still suffer with the disease worldwide, and 1.4 million die each year, according to World Heart Federation. [More]
GEBN makes meaningful contributions to improve public health

GEBN makes meaningful contributions to improve public health

As the scientific community gathers at Experimental Biology 2015, the Global Energy Balance Network is poised to make meaningful contributions to the broader community's efforts to improve public health. GEBN is a network of scientists from North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania who have banded together to further the understanding of the regulation of energy utilization by the body (energy balance) and apply this understanding to develop novel approaches to health and wellness. [More]
High levels of pesticide residues in fruits, vegetables can affect semen quality

High levels of pesticide residues in fruits, vegetables can affect semen quality

Men who ate fruits and vegetables with higher levels of pesticide residues—such as strawberries, spinach, and peppers—had lower sperm count and a lower percentage of normal sperm than those who ate produce with lower residue levels, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Study examines efficacy of continuous UV-C robots versus pulsed xenon in preventing infection

Study examines efficacy of continuous UV-C robots versus pulsed xenon in preventing infection

The efficacy of continuous UV-C disinfection robots versus pulsed xenon (PU-UX) was highlighted in a recently published study of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection systems by an influential infection prevention research team, including Curtis Donskey, M.D. [More]
Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

The adverse health effects caused by fine particles have been known for some time. In addition, ultrafine particles appear to play a significant role in cardiac function - even if an individual is exposed to these for only a few minutes, as scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München have now been able to show. [More]
Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have identified a unique pattern of immune molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that provides insights into the basis for cognitive dysfunction--frequently described by patients as "brain fog"--as well as new hope for improvements in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

An outbreak of a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain resistant to antibiotics has been linked to contaminated endoscopes in a Washington state hospital. The study indicates that industry standard cleaning guidelines, which were exceeded by hospital staff, may not be sufficient for sterilizing endoscopes adequately. [More]
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