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Financial incentive programs help smokers kick the habit, finds Penn study

Financial incentive programs help smokers kick the habit, finds Penn study

Four different financial incentive programs, each worth roughly $800 over six months, all help more smokers kick the habit than providing free access to behavioral counseling and nicotine replacement therapy. Further, the way in which equally-sized payouts are structured influences their effectiveness. [More]
Loyola study examines survival outcomes in patients with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

Loyola study examines survival outcomes in patients with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

Among the deadliest cancers is a rare malignancy called mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, which begins in cartilage around bones and typically strikes young adults. [More]
Researchers present new model for evaluating malaria treatment programs across multiple countries

Researchers present new model for evaluating malaria treatment programs across multiple countries

In a study published this month in Malaria Journal, researchers from Uppsala University and other institutions present a new model for systematically evaluating new malaria treatment programs in routine conditions across multiple countries. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors - especially those whose treatment included brain irradiation or chemotherapy with glucocorticoids - are 14 percent more likely to be obese than their healthy peers. [More]
Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome signs commercialization agreement with AOP for ESMOCARD products

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that the company has entered a commercialization agreement with AOP Orphan Pharma to sell AOP's cardiovascular products, ESMOCARD and ESMOCARD LYO (esmolol hydrochloride) in Italy, France, Spain and Belgium. [More]
New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

Physicians treating hospitalized patients for conditions unrelated to the kidneys should pay close attention to common blood and urine tests for kidney function in order to prevent incidental injury to the organs that help cleanse the body of toxins, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

A new study links a father's age at birth to the risk that his child will develop blood and immune system cancers as an adult, particularly for only children. The study, which appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found no association between having an older mother and these cancers. [More]
Myopia on the rise across Europe, new study finds

Myopia on the rise across Europe, new study finds

Myopia or short-sightedness is becoming more common across Europe, according to a new study led by King's College London. The meta-analysis of findings from 15 studies by the European Eye Epidemiology Consortium found that around a quarter of the European population is short-sighted but it is nearly twice as common in younger people, with almost half (47 per cent) of the group aged between 25 and 29 years affected. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Natural substance could help people avoid cavities, gum disease

Natural substance could help people avoid cavities, gum disease

Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers at the University of Michigan and Newcastle University have discovered. [More]
Accelerated brain aging related to cognitive complications observed in people with type 1 diabetes

Accelerated brain aging related to cognitive complications observed in people with type 1 diabetes

The brains of people with type 1 diabetes show signs of accelerated aging that correlate with slower information processing, according to research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers present landmark studies at AATS meeting

Mount Sinai researchers present landmark studies at AATS meeting

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers presented several landmark studies at the 2015 American Association for Thoracic Surgery meeting in Seattle. [More]
UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston are helping to make precision medicine a reality by sequencing entire exomes of people to assess chronic disease risk and drug efficacy. The results of a study on this topic were published in Nature Genetics on Monday. [More]
1 in 5 nursing home residents with dementia harbor strains of drug-resistant bacteria

1 in 5 nursing home residents with dementia harbor strains of drug-resistant bacteria

A new study found one in five nursing home residents with advanced dementia harbor strains of drug-resistant bacteria and more than 10 percent of the drug-resistant bacteria are resistant to four or more antibiotic classes. The research was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Post-surgical hospital readmission after discharge and repeat emergency room (ER) visits are not unusual for patients who have undergone major thoracic surgery. Recognizing this problem, clinicians at McMaster University have implemented an innovative, active post-discharge intervention for thoracic surgery patients that is based on the principle of a "one team-one approach" that is initiated while the patient is still hospitalized. [More]
Researchers say that lack of safety at school, poverty associated with childhood obesity

Researchers say that lack of safety at school, poverty associated with childhood obesity

A lack of safety at school is one of the correlates of childhood obesity, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Research Centre at CHU Sainte Justine children's hospital. [More]
Men undergoing circumcision may be at increased risk of infecting female partners with HIV

Men undergoing circumcision may be at increased risk of infecting female partners with HIV

In the midst of an international campaign to slow the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization recommends male circumcision (the surgical removal of foreskin from the penis) which reduces HIV acquisition by 50-60%. [More]
New genetic mutation appears to protect people from Type 2 diabetes

New genetic mutation appears to protect people from Type 2 diabetes

An international team of scientists led by a Cedars-Sinai researcher has identified a new genetic mutation that appears to protect people from developing Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Consortium of researchers awarded NIH grant to establish District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research

Consortium of researchers awarded NIH grant to establish District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research

An interdisciplinary, city-wide consortium of researchers, led by Alan E. Greenberg, MD, MPH, professor and chair, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) at the George Washington University, has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health for an expected $7.5 million over five years to fund the newly established District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research. [More]
New analysis finds that rates of health insurance coverage vary by demographics, cancer type

New analysis finds that rates of health insurance coverage vary by demographics, cancer type

A new analysis has found that, among patients with cancer, rates of health insurance coverage vary by patient demographics and by cancer type. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that the expansion of coverage through the Affordable Care Act may disproportionally benefit certain patient populations. [More]
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