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Prevalence of global diabetes has been vastly underestimated, say Monash researchers

Prevalence of global diabetes has been vastly underestimated, say Monash researchers

A landmark paper led by Monash University with partners in the UK and US suggests there may be more than 100 million people with diabetes globally than previously thought. [More]
High frequency of alleles could increase risk of lupus in non-Europeans

High frequency of alleles could increase risk of lupus in non-Europeans

Non-Europeans have a higher frequency of the gene variants that increase the risk of lupus as compared to the European population, a new study from researchers at the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' and King's College London, has confirmed. [More]
Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

Study finds link between AF and reduced frontal lobe brain volumes

According to a recent Framingham Heart Study, people who experience the heart arrhythmia atrial fibrillation (AF), may also suffer from a smaller brain, specifically reduced frontal lobe volume. [More]
Study estimates global trends in diabetes prevalence

Study estimates global trends in diabetes prevalence

A female researcher from UPM is involved in a study that estimates the global prevalence of diabetes and anticipates future trends. [More]
New study to investigate how genetic factors contribute to breast cancer disparities

New study to investigate how genetic factors contribute to breast cancer disparities

The largest study ever to investigate how genetic and biological factors contribute to breast cancer risk among black women launched today. [More]
Vigorous and moderate exercise have same effect on patients with NAFLD

Vigorous and moderate exercise have same effect on patients with NAFLD

A new study shows a brisk walk is just as good as a jog when it comes to reducing liver fatty content, important news for the more than 3 million people diagnosed each year in the U.S. with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
BU researcher receives grant to better understand breast cancer in African-American women

BU researcher receives grant to better understand breast cancer in African-American women

Why do African-American women die at a higher rate and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women? Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute to explore this question. [More]
Unhealthy food and beverage marketing ads influence dietary preference in children

Unhealthy food and beverage marketing ads influence dietary preference in children

Ads for unhealthy foods and beverages high in sugar or salt have an immediate and significant impact on children and lead to harmful diets, according to research from McMaster University. [More]
Replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats in diet can confer substantial health benefits

Replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats in diet can confer substantial health benefits

Consuming higher amounts of unsaturated fats was associated with lower mortality, according to a study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Study shows how pasta consumption is linked to reduced likelihood of general, abdominal obesity

Study shows how pasta consumption is linked to reduced likelihood of general, abdominal obesity

In recent years pasta gained a bad reputation: it will fatten you. This led lots of people to limit its consumption, often as part of some aggressive "do it yourself" diets. Now a study conducted by the Department of Epidemiology, I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed in Pozzilli, Italy, does justice to this fundamental element of the Mediterranean diet, showing how pasta consumption is actually associated with a reduced likelihood of both general and abdominal obesity. [More]
Environmental toxins affect children's brain development, experts agree

Environmental toxins affect children's brain development, experts agree

An unprecedented alliance of leading scientists, health professionals, and children's and environmental health advocates agree for the first time that today's scientific evidence supports a link between exposures to toxic chemicals in air, water, food and everyday products and children's risks for neurodevelopmental disorders. [More]
CHSN provides key data on health care needs and service utilization of American college students

CHSN provides key data on health care needs and service utilization of American college students

Approximately 1,500 health services exist on United States college campuses providing medical and behavioral services to students. The College Health Surveillance Network provides a unique database on the health status and health care utilization of college students. [More]
Advances in cancer detection and treatment create large numbers of older cancer survivors

Advances in cancer detection and treatment create large numbers of older cancer survivors

Improved cancer detection and treatment efforts, combined with demographic trends, are creating larger numbers of older cancer survivors who are likely to have other health conditions that impact care and well-being. [More]
Paracetamol use during pregnancy linked to hyperactivity, autism spectrum symptoms in children

Paracetamol use during pregnancy linked to hyperactivity, autism spectrum symptoms in children

A new study has found that paracetamol (acetaminophen), which is used extensively during pregnancy, has a strong association with autism spectrum symptoms in boys and for both genders in relation to attention-related and hyperactivity symptoms. [More]
Women with BRCA1 gene mutation at increased risk of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 gene mutation at increased risk of aggressive uterine cancer

Women who carry the BRCA1 gene mutation that dramatically increases their risk of breast and ovarian cancers are also at higher risk for a lethal form of uterine cancer, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. [More]
Excess or insufficient sleep may increase diabetes risk in men

Excess or insufficient sleep may increase diabetes risk in men

Men who sleep either fewer or more hours than average may face a greater risk of developing diabetes, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
New study demonstrates no risk of contracting dementia through blood transfusion

New study demonstrates no risk of contracting dementia through blood transfusion

Previous studies have shown that neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can be induced in healthy laboratory animals, causing concern that dementia diseases can be transmitted between individuals, possibly via blood transfusions. [More]
Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine experts and colleagues in the United States and Africa have received an $11 million, five-year NIH grant to understand why some people living with HIV in Africa avoid becoming infected with the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) despite exposure to high-TB-risk circumstances. [More]
Study shows women with CIN3 more likely to develop anogenital cancers

Study shows women with CIN3 more likely to develop anogenital cancers

Women with a history of severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precancerous condition of the cervix that arises from infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), had a long-term increased risk of developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer. [More]
Canadian study reveals who benefits most from cardiac rehab program

Canadian study reveals who benefits most from cardiac rehab program

Toronto Rehab researchers have discovered a new approach for determining which patient populations benefit most from cardiac rehabilitation. [More]
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