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Music therapy reduces anxiety in women undergoing surgical breast biopsies

Music therapy reduces anxiety in women undergoing surgical breast biopsies

A first-of-its-kind study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology finds that music therapy lessened anxiety for women undergoing surgical breast biopsies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Calorie control is key to losing or maintaining weight

Calorie control is key to losing or maintaining weight

Physical activity has many health benefits, ranging from reducing the risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer to improving mental health and mood. [More]
Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Promoting breastfeeding could lead to a substantial reduction in common infections and even deaths that are more common in Indigenous infants than non-Indigenous infants, a new study suggests. [More]
PTSD not associated with increased risk for cancer, find BUSM researchers

PTSD not associated with increased risk for cancer, find BUSM researchers

In the largest study to date that examines Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as a risk factor for cancer, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, have shown no evidence of an association. [More]
New system accurately and reliably captures patient experience with cancer drug side effects

New system accurately and reliably captures patient experience with cancer drug side effects

In cancer clinical trials, symptom side effects patients experience, like nausea, are typically reported by doctors, and not directly by patients. Previous research has shown that doctors under-report these symptoms. [More]
National Cancer Institute's PRO-CTCAE accurate and reliable compared to other patient-reported measures

National Cancer Institute's PRO-CTCAE accurate and reliable compared to other patient-reported measures

A multicenter study involving Mayo Clinic researchers has found that the National Cancer Institute's Patient Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE), was accurate, reliable and responsive, compared to other, established patient-reported and clinical measures. The study is published today in the journal JAMA Oncology. [More]
Organ transplant recipients more likely to develop melanoma

Organ transplant recipients more likely to develop melanoma

Organ transplant recipients are twice as likely to develop melanoma as people who do not undergo a transplant, and three times more likely to die of the dangerous skin cancer, suggests new research led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health student. [More]
Chances of survival due to chemotherapy significantly lower for older breast cancer patients

Chances of survival due to chemotherapy significantly lower for older breast cancer patients

Chemotherapy prolongs life for older adults with most types of cancer, but for women over the age of 80 with breast cancer, the chances of survival due to chemotherapy are significantly lower, according to a study led by researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Adult IQ of children with very low birth weight can be predicted by age two

Adult IQ of children with very low birth weight can be predicted by age two

Research from the University of Warwick indicates that the IQ of adults born very premature or of very low birth weight can be predicted when they are just a toddler. [More]
Postmenopausal women more likely to use vaginal estrogen to achieve significantly higher sexual quality of life

Postmenopausal women more likely to use vaginal estrogen to achieve significantly higher sexual quality of life

Local vaginal estrogen (VE) appears to have escaped the shroud of doubt cast upon hormone therapy as a result of the Women's Health Initiative Study by providing numerous medical benefits without systemic effects. That's according to a new study reported online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
JAYAO article highlights benefits and risks of adolescent sibling stem cell donation

JAYAO article highlights benefits and risks of adolescent sibling stem cell donation

A sibling may often be the best match for a patient who needs a stem cell transplant, but especially for adolescent donors, who are at a vulnerable age, factors such as the responsibility to donate versus a perception of free choice and the potential for anxiety and guilt in the face of complications or poor outcomes demand careful consideration. [More]
Trans fats associated with greater risk of death, coronary heart disease

Trans fats associated with greater risk of death, coronary heart disease

A study led by researchers at McMaster University has found that that trans fats are associated with greater risk of death and coronary heart disease, but saturated fats are not associated with an increased risk of death, heart disease, stroke, or Type 2 diabetes. [More]
New Johns Hopkins study shows hepatitis C infection may spell heart trouble

New Johns Hopkins study shows hepatitis C infection may spell heart trouble

People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble. [More]
McMaster research shows benefits of corticosteroid therapy for patients with pneumonia

McMaster research shows benefits of corticosteroid therapy for patients with pneumonia

McMaster University research, published online today by the Annals of Internal Medicine, has demonstrated the benefits of corticosteroid therapy for one of the most common serious medical conditions. [More]
Major gaps found in existing evidence for best practices for cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent HAIs

Major gaps found in existing evidence for best practices for cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent HAIs

Tray tables, bed rails, light switches, and toilets: All are common vectors for swapping germs between patients and health care workers. While a new systematic overview in this week's Annals of Internal Medicine points to several promising cleaning tactics of these "high-touch surfaces," there's a lack of evidence as to which is the most effective at reducing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
BMC partners with RIH, CVS to support pharmacy-based naloxone rescue kits to help combat opioid addiction, overdose

BMC partners with RIH, CVS to support pharmacy-based naloxone rescue kits to help combat opioid addiction, overdose

Boston Medical Center has received a $1.3 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to support a demonstration project of pharmacy-based naloxone rescue kits to help reduce opioid addiction and overdose death in two New England States: Massachusetts and Rhode Island. [More]
Leading public health scholars argue that increasing national focus on precision medicine misguided

Leading public health scholars argue that increasing national focus on precision medicine misguided

The increasing national focus on personalized or 'precision' medicine is misguided, distracting from broader investments to reduce health inequities and address the social factors that affect population health, two leading public health scholars argue in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Investigational topical drug shows promise in patients with early stage cutaneous T cell lymphoma

Investigational topical drug shows promise in patients with early stage cutaneous T cell lymphoma

Results of a phase one trial show that an investigational topical drug, resiquimod gel, causes regression of both treated and untreated tumor lesions and may completely remove cancerous cells from both sites in patients with early stage cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) - a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects the skin. [More]
Metformin drug has impact on blood fat levels

Metformin drug has impact on blood fat levels

Besides affecting the blood sugar levels, the substance Metformin, also has an impact on blood fat levels. This was elucidated by an interdisciplinary team of the German Center for Diabetes Research headed by Dr. Rui Wang-Sattler of the Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen. Especially the harmful LDL cholesterol can be reduced. [More]

Potentially harmful bacteria can survive on endoscopes despite cleaning and disinfecting process

Potentially harmful bacteria can survive on endoscopes used to examine the interior of the digestive tract, despite a multi-step cleaning and disinfecting process, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
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