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People injured by police officers more likely to have mental illness

People injured by police officers more likely to have mental illness

People hospitalized due to an encounter with a law enforcement officer are more likely to have a mental illness, have longer hospitalizations, more injuries to the back and spine, and greater need for extended care than those hospitalized due to altercations with other civilians. [More]
Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

African American and Hispanic adolescents and young adults fare far worse than their white counterparts when faced with a mostly curable type of cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, a study by a UC Davis epidemiologist has found. [More]
UI researchers remind US doctors to watch for two diseases that could be passed from mother to child

UI researchers remind US doctors to watch for two diseases that could be passed from mother to child

While world health leaders race to contain the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in the Americas, researchers at the University of Iowa are reminding doctors in the United States to be on the lookout for two other vector-borne and potentially life-threatening diseases that can be passed from mother to child through the placenta. [More]
Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

When countries, rich or poor, support breastfeeding through meaningful investments and programs, it has an impact on their bottom line and the health of women and children. The Lancet Breastfeeding Series, released today, finds that globally, the costs of lower cognitive ability associated with not breastfeeding amount to more than $300 billion each year, a figure comparable to the entire global pharmaceutical market. [More]
Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women who come to Canada have greater risk of giving birth prematurely than non-refugee immigrants, a study by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher has found. Those risks are fueled by the fact that the preterm birth rate was 7.1 per cent among secondary refugees - those who spent more than six months in a transit country before arriving in Canada -compared to five per cent among secondary, non-refugee immigrants. [More]
Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

More than 1 in 20 (nearly 3.3 million) children between the ages of 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to an analysis of the first large-scale, nationally representative survey of these problems in U.S. children. [More]
Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Leaders of several cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute have united to support human papillomavirus vaccination. Among them is Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Vital Strategies launched to improve global health

Vital Strategies launched to improve global health

A new name in global health - Vital Strategies was launched today, with a mission of reducing disease and premature death and helping to deliver a world where every person has the protection of a strong public health system. [More]
Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Contrary to current clinical belief, regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats, which, while common, can lead in rare cases to heart- or stroke-related morbidity and mortality, according to UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Genes that influence people's health also have impact on some cognitive functions

Genes that influence people's health also have impact on some cognitive functions

Genes that influence people's health also shape how effectively they think, a study shows. Scientists found that genes associated with diseases including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and autism also have an impact on some cognitive functions. [More]

Better universal healthcare needed to reduce CHE for low-income TB patients in China

Improved universal healthcare is urgently needed to lower catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) for low-income tuberculosis (TB) patients in China, according to a study published in the open access journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. [More]
Colorectal cancer in younger patients associated with more advanced disease but better survival

Colorectal cancer in younger patients associated with more advanced disease but better survival

Nearly 15 percent of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were younger than 50, the age at which screening recommendations begin. [More]
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

Enterobacteriaceae refer to the family of bacteria such as E. coli and Klebsiella that are bacterial pathogens most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infections [More]
African-American pediatric lymphoma patients have inferior outcomes compared to white and Hispanic peers

African-American pediatric lymphoma patients have inferior outcomes compared to white and Hispanic peers

Researchers from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine today published a study showing that African-American pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma patients have inferior overall survival to their white and Hispanic peers. [More]
Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that when human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is detected in peoples' mouths, they are 22 times more likely than those without HPV-16 to develop a type of head and neck cancer. [More]
Facts associated with Zika virus

Facts associated with Zika virus

As the Zika virus captures headlines across the United States, with its possible link to birth defects and the first cases reported in the U.S. (all traced back to overseas travel), it's an opportune time to review the facts associated with this disease. [More]
Metabolic profile derived from routine newborn screenings could determine infant's gestational age

Metabolic profile derived from routine newborn screenings could determine infant's gestational age

Knowing if an infant was born on time or prematurely can make all the difference in deciding what medical care the baby needs. [More]
OSU researchers find no evidence that water births pose increased harm to newborns

OSU researchers find no evidence that water births pose increased harm to newborns

There is no evidence that water births, where a baby is intentionally born under water in a tub or pool, poses any increased harm to the child, Oregon State University researchers have found. [More]
Parental support programmes could promote healthy eating behaviours in obese children

Parental support programmes could promote healthy eating behaviours in obese children

Parental support programmes in areas with the greatest needs can have a positive effect on the consumption of unhealthy food and drink and on weight increases in obese children. This according to a randomised study conducted by Karolinska Institutet and the Stockholm County Council, Sweden, published in the International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity. [More]
Pre-pregnancy obesity strongly linked to infant mortality

Pre-pregnancy obesity strongly linked to infant mortality

Pre-pregnancy obesity is strongly associated with infant mortality, and compliance with weight-gain guidelines during pregnancy has a limited impact on that mortality risk, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers shows. [More]
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