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MGB Biopharma provides update on business performance for 2014

MGB Biopharma provides update on business performance for 2014

MGB Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing a truly novel class of anti-infectives, provides an update on its business performance for 2014. MGB Biopharma is developing a pipeline of novel antimicrobials that puts it at the forefront of addressing the major global problem of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Family history could help physicians identify prostate cancer risk

Family history could help physicians identify prostate cancer risk

A discovery by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute shows that looking at whether a man's uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer. A more complete family history would give physicians a new tool to decide whether or not a PSA test was appropriate. [More]
New UCLA study sheds light on why some people develop PTSD

New UCLA study sheds light on why some people develop PTSD

Why do some people develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) while others who suffered the same ordeal do not? A new UCLA discovery may shed light on the answer. [More]
Certain patients with type 2 diabetes, renal impairment discouraged from taking metformin

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes, renal impairment discouraged from taking metformin

Many patients with type 2 diabetes in the United States may be discouraged from taking metformin—a proven, oral diabetes medicine—because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration inappropriately labels the drug unsafe for some patients also suffering from kidney problems, researchers from Penn Medicine and Weill Cornel Medical College report this week in a research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Personal traits may help protect police officers from PTSD symptoms

Personal traits may help protect police officers from PTSD symptoms

Personal traits such as resilience, satisfaction with life and a grateful disposition may help shield police officers from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of a natural disaster. [More]
Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves older men with prostate cancer

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves older men with prostate cancer

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology this week from Penn Medicine researchers. [More]
LEO Pharma submits NDA for aerosol foam formulation to treat patients with plaque psoriasis

LEO Pharma submits NDA for aerosol foam formulation to treat patients with plaque psoriasis

LEO Pharma announces it has submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) for calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam, 0.005%/0.064%, to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. [More]
Cardiac arrest associated with high mortality even in the world of Star Trek

Cardiac arrest associated with high mortality even in the world of Star Trek

The Star Trek universe is one of the most popular pieces of science fiction entertainment. Lots of the technologies seen in the TV and cinema episodes featuring Captain Kirk, Mr Spock or Captain Picard were once regarded as futuristic, but have now become reality - with examples including wireless communication or portable computers. In a recent study by the University Department of Emergency Medicine at the MedUni Vienna, the make-believe future of the human race depicted in this series has been used to investigate the frequency and mortality of cardiac arrests in the 24th century. [More]
Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Where you live affects the type of bacteria that cause bloodstream infections, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and an international team of investigators. The closer you live to the equator, the greater the likelihood of a bloodstream infection caused by a group of bacteria called Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in warm and moist environments, compared to another group of bacteria referred to as Gram-positive bacteria. [More]
Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Self-reported moderate to vigorous exercise was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels in a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

While the overall death rate from firearm violence has remained unchanged for more than a decade, the patterns for suicide and homicide have changed dramatically, a UC Davis study on the epidemiology of gun violence from 2003 to 2012 has found. [More]
Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

A prospective nationwide survey on perceptions of lung cancer in the general population of France highlights a need for increased public education on the benefits of lung cancer screening, the good survival rates of early-stage disease and the improved outcomes with new therapeutic strategies, including targeted-therapies. [More]
UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

A new study from UVA Cancer Center found that adding a measurement of breast density better predicts women's risk for breast cancer. Including breast density as part of risk models for breast cancer could support the development of a personalized risk model to recommend how often a woman should have a mammogram based on her unique risk factors. [More]

Study shows numeracy linked to bowel cancer screening

PEOPLE who have problems with numbers may be more likely to feel negative about bowel cancer screening, including fearing an abnormal result, while some think the test is disgusting or embarrassing, according to a Cancer Research UK supported study published today (Monday) in the Journal of Health Psychology. [More]
Sensitive toxicity test aims to detect dangerous side effects in pharmaceutical development

Sensitive toxicity test aims to detect dangerous side effects in pharmaceutical development

Because of undetected toxicity problems, about a third of prescription drugs approved in the U.S. are withdrawn from the market or require added warning labels limiting their use. An exceptionally sensitive toxicity test invented at the University of Utah could make it possible to uncover more of these dangerous side effects early in pharmaceutical development so that fewer patients are given unsafe drugs. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Signifor long-acting release (LAR) (pasireotide) for injectable suspension, for intramuscular use, for the treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to surgery and/or for whom surgery is not an option. [More]
Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Despite emerging evidence otherwise, many college students consider hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes, reports a University of South Florida College of Public Health study published this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Key steps to improve care for pregnant mothers and babies affected by CDH

Key steps to improve care for pregnant mothers and babies affected by CDH

A new study has revealed key steps for hospitals to improve care for pregnant mums and babies affected by a life-threatening condition. [More]

New report explores pros and cons of working with real world medical data

A new report by researchers at RTI Health Solutions and parent company RTI International, found that although healthcare databases have allowed for greater access to real world medical data, using databases to evaluate the safety of medical products is complex and requires careful research consideration. [More]