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Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese, it has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. [More]
New research explores why active surveillance underused in patients with prostate cancer

New research explores why active surveillance underused in patients with prostate cancer

New research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is shedding light on the important role a diagnosing urologist plays in whether older men with low-risk prostate cancer receive treatment for their disease, and if so, the type of treatment they receive as a result. [More]
Study: Obese firefighters don’t get weight management advice from health care providers

Study: Obese firefighters don’t get weight management advice from health care providers

Obese and overweight firefighters are not receiving weight management advice from their health care providers, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Rates of testicular cancer rise in recent years among young Hispanic American men

Rates of testicular cancer rise in recent years among young Hispanic American men

A new analysis has found that rates of testicular cancer have been rising dramatically in recent years among young Hispanic American men, but not among their non-Hispanic counterparts. [More]
People who grow up farm with livestock better protected against inflammatory bowel diseases

People who grow up farm with livestock better protected against inflammatory bowel diseases

New research conducted at Aarhus University has revealed that people who have grown up on a farm with livestock are only half as likely as their urban counterparts to develop the most common inflammatory bowel diseases: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. [More]
Students looking to bump up their GPA need to join gym

Students looking to bump up their GPA need to join gym

For those students looking to bump up their grade point averages during college, the answer may not be spending more time in a library or study hall, but in a gym. [More]
National Gay Blood Drive to take place on July 11, 2014

National Gay Blood Drive to take place on July 11, 2014

On Friday, July 11, the second annual nationwide National Gay Blood Drive (NGBD) will take place to raise public awareness and increase pressure on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to change its policy on the long-standing ban on blood donation by men who have had sex with other men (MSM) – a restriction that has been in place since 1983. [More]
Vasectomy associated with small increased risk of prostate cancer

Vasectomy associated with small increased risk of prostate cancer

Vasectomy was associated with a small increased risk of prostate cancer, and a stronger risk for advanced or lethal prostate cancer according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
Over 650 000 children develop tuberculosis every year in the 22 HBCs according to new estimates

Over 650 000 children develop tuberculosis every year in the 22 HBCs according to new estimates

New estimates indicate that over 650 000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs)*—almost 25% higher than the total number of new cases worldwide estimated by WHO in 2012 (530 000)**. The research, published in The Lancet Global Health, also suggests that about 15 million children are exposed to TB every year, and roughly 53 million are living with latent TB infection, which can progress to infectious active TB at any time. [More]
Maternal inflammation in maternal blood linked with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring

Maternal inflammation in maternal blood linked with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring

Maternal inflammation as indicated by the presence in maternal blood of early gestational C-reactive protein-an established inflammatory biomarker-appears to be associated with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. [More]
Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at young age

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at young age

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three countries. [More]
Study: Behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes

Study: Behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes. [More]
CWRU receives $12.6 million from NIA to identify rare genetic variants that contribute to Alzheimer's

CWRU receives $12.6 million from NIA to identify rare genetic variants that contribute to Alzheimer's

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine are part of a five-university collaboration receiving a $12.6 million, four-year grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to identify rare genetic variants that may either protect against, or contribute to Alzheimer's disease risk. [More]
Study: Infant toenails reliable way to estimate arsenic exposure before birth

Study: Infant toenails reliable way to estimate arsenic exposure before birth

Infant toenails are a reliable way to estimate arsenic exposure before birth, a Dartmouth College study shows. The findings appear in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology. A PDF of the study is available on request. [More]
Excessive belly fat: A risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Excessive belly fat: A risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Obesity, especially excessive belly fat, is a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Simple and hygienic measures can prevent campylobacter infections

Simple and hygienic measures can prevent campylobacter infections

In Switzerland, between 7000 and 8000 persons fall ill with a campylobacter infection annually. This makes it the most frequent bacterial disease transmitted through food. [More]
New meta-analysis highlights significant gaps in hepatitis C care

New meta-analysis highlights significant gaps in hepatitis C care

A new meta-analysis published online in PLOS ONE by infectious disease and epidemiology specialists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania highlights significant gaps in hepatitis C care that will prove useful as the U.S. health care system continues to see an influx of patients with the disease because of improved screening efforts and new, promising drugs. [More]
Testosterone therapy does not increase men's risk for heart attack, shows UTMB study

Testosterone therapy does not increase men's risk for heart attack, shows UTMB study

Testosterone prescriptions for older men in the United States have increased more than three-fold over the past decade. Recent studies linking testosterone use with increased risk of heart attack and stroke have caused widespread concern among patients and their families. [More]
NMR spectroscopy for in-vitro diagnostic research: an interview with Dr. Manfred Spraul, Director of NMR Applications, Bruker BioSpin

NMR spectroscopy for in-vitro diagnostic research: an interview with Dr. Manfred Spraul, Director of NMR Applications, Bruker BioSpin

Our aim is to open new fields to NMR where we haven’t been before. Because of the extreme stability of our instruments, we can now really think about new applications: going to hospitals, going to food companies and just placing an instrument there that works completely under automation. [More]
Use of catheter ablation lowers risk for atrial fibrillation

Use of catheter ablation lowers risk for atrial fibrillation

Use of catheter ablation is not only beneficial for treating atrial flutter but also can significantly reduce hospital visits - both inpatient and emergency - and lower the risk for atrial fibrillation, according to research by UC San Francisco. [More]