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Women diagnosed with DCIS or atypia should seek second opinions, says study

Women diagnosed with DCIS or atypia should seek second opinions, says study

While doctors almost always agree on a pathological diagnosis of invasive breast cancer, there is room for improvement when diagnosing atypia (or atypical ductal hyperplasia-ADH) and DCIS (ductal carcinoma in-situ), Anna Tosteson, ScD and Tracy Onega, PhD from Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have found. [More]
Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria. [More]
New diet may significantly lower risk of Alzheimer's disease

New diet may significantly lower risk of Alzheimer's disease

A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. [More]
Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Greening vacant lots may be associated with biologic reductions in stress, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents who walked near newly greened vacant lots had significantly lower heart rates compared to walking near a blighted, or neglected, vacant lot. [More]
New scoring system may help predict memory and thinking problems in elderly people

New scoring system may help predict memory and thinking problems in elderly people

Researchers have developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the March 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New method of testing deadly pathogen could help combat cystic fibrosis

New method of testing deadly pathogen could help combat cystic fibrosis

A new method of testing the most common cause of life-threatening infection in people with cystic fibrosis could improve efforts to study and combat the illness. [More]
Genetic markers may help decide who benefits from aspirin, NSAIDs in lowering risk of colorectal cancer

Genetic markers may help decide who benefits from aspirin, NSAIDs in lowering risk of colorectal cancer

An Indiana University cancer researcher and her colleagues have identified genetic markers that may help determine who benefits from regular use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for lowering one's risk of developing colorectal cancer. [More]
Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Simultaneous use of hormones and statins can protect women from heart disease after menopause

Hormones may not protect women from heart disease or stroke after menopause, but when combined with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, they may help protect women from these killers, shows a population study from Sweden to be published in the April issue of Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

Results of pacritinib Phase 2 study in myelofibrosis patients published in journal 'Blood'

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced that results of a Phase 2 study of pacritinib, in patients with myelofibrosis were published in the journal Blood. Pacritinib is a next-generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor currently in Phase 3 development in the PERSIST program. [More]
Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that major disruptions in the health care systems in West Africa caused by the Ebola crisis have led to significant decreases in vaccinations for childhood diseases, increasing susceptibility to measles and other vaccine-preventable illnesses. [More]
Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing the minimum age of legal access (MLA) to tobacco products will prevent or delay initiation of tobacco use by adolescents and young adults, particularly those ages 15 to 17, and improve the health of Americans across the lifespan, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. [More]
Scientists explore the potential genetic basis for loneliness

Scientists explore the potential genetic basis for loneliness

Loneliness may be a fundamental part of the human condition, but scientists have only recently begun exploring its causes, consequences, and potential interventions. [More]
Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Until now there have been few molecular epidemiological studies regarding the effects of weight changes on metabolism in the general population. In a recent study conducted and funded within the framework of the Competence Network Obesity, researchers at the Institute of Epidemiology II at Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen evaluated molecular data of the KORA study. [More]
BU study explores birth outcomes for women who receive fertility treatment

BU study explores birth outcomes for women who receive fertility treatment

Birth outcomes for babies whose mothers used assisted reproductive technology (ART) are better in some cases, and worse in others, than for subfertile women who did not use ART, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Simple low-cost intervention could help reduce HIV-related deaths in Africa

Simple low-cost intervention could help reduce HIV-related deaths in Africa

A new approach to care for patients with advanced HIV in Tanzania and Zambia, combining community support and screening for a type of meningitis, has reduced deaths by 28%. [More]
Researchers study effects of pregnancy weight gain on childhood obesity risk among multi-ethnic youth

Researchers study effects of pregnancy weight gain on childhood obesity risk among multi-ethnic youth

Unhealthy weight gain in pregnancy has been linked with infant size and body composition but until now little was known about its long-term association with childhood obesity among low-income and multi-ethnic youth. [More]
Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced positive top-line results for the primary endpoint from PERSIST-1, the randomized, controlled Phase 3 registration clinical trial examining pacritinib, a next generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. [More]
Breast cancer survivors at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, finds new study

Breast cancer survivors at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, finds new study

Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, especially within five years of their breast cancer diagnosis, according to a new analysis of a large national database. The study results will be presented Thursday at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Lifestyle intervention program at workplace reduces risk factors for diabetes, heart disease

Lifestyle intervention program at workplace reduces risk factors for diabetes, heart disease

A healthy lifestyle intervention program administered at the workplace and developed by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health significantly reduces risk factors for diabetes and heart disease, according to a study reported in the March issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. [More]
Covalon announces introduction of new MediClear product line to reduce surgical site infections

Covalon announces introduction of new MediClear product line to reduce surgical site infections

Covalon Technologies Ltd, an advanced medical technologies company, today announced the introduction of its new MediClear product line designed to significantly improve patient compliance with efforts to reduce surgical site infections (SSI). [More]
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