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Mosquitoes known to transmit dengue, chikungunya more likely to lay eggs in water sources near flowers

Certain mosquitoes are more likely to lay eggs in water sources near flowers than in water sources without flowers, according to an article published in the Journal of Medical Entomology. [More]
Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) changed the composition and diversity of gut microbes, which in turn shaped how the drug is broken down and ultimately, cut its effectiveness, according to an animal study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
New AARDA report highlights key issues and trends at State of Autoimmunity National Summit

New AARDA report highlights key issues and trends at State of Autoimmunity National Summit

What are the known environmental factors that trigger autoimmune disease and what are the latest technologies being developed to measure an individual's exposure to such risks? [More]
Simplified mathematical model to study spread of dengue fever in urban areas

Simplified mathematical model to study spread of dengue fever in urban areas

Mathematics is often implemented in healthcare and medical research. From health management to the bio-pharmaceutical fields, math modeling can be used to predict the spread of diseases, how to prevent epidemics and so much more. [More]
Turing Pharmaceuticals emphasizes continued availability of Daraprim

Turing Pharmaceuticals emphasizes continued availability of Daraprim

Turing Pharmaceuticals AG, a privately-held biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative treatments for serious diseases and conditions, today emphasizes the continued availability of Daraprim and cautions healthcare providers of proposed alternatives to Daraprim. [More]
New vaccine shows promise against Middle East respiratory syndrome in dromedary camels

New vaccine shows promise against Middle East respiratory syndrome in dromedary camels

An international research project with the involvement of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the Animal Health Research Centre (IRTA-CReSA), has designed a vaccine shown to be effective in protecting dromedaries against the coronavirus (CoV) that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). [More]
Findings show promising evidence for creating broad-spectrum antiviral

Findings show promising evidence for creating broad-spectrum antiviral

UW researchers working in collaboration with Kineta Inc. and the University of Texas at Galveston have shown that making a drug-like molecule to turn on innate immunity can induce genes to control infection in several -known viruses. [More]
Candidiasis needs to be treated early, aggressively to help vulnerable hospitalized patients

Candidiasis needs to be treated early, aggressively to help vulnerable hospitalized patients

One of the most common causes of healthcare-associated infections, candidiasis is a serious, life-threatening fungal infection that needs to be treated early, aggressively and appropriately, note updated guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Scientists reveal major players in severe muscle damage caused by sepsis

Scientists reveal major players in severe muscle damage caused by sepsis

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Paris Descartes University, Sainte-Anne Hospital and the CNRS have recently published a paper in Nature Communications in which they reveal major players in the severe muscle damage caused by sepsis, or septicemia, which explains why many patients suffer debilitating muscle impairment long-term after recovery. [More]
SLU researcher discovered world's first dengue vaccine

SLU researcher discovered world's first dengue vaccine

A vaccine to prevent dengue fever discovered by a Saint Louis University researcher in 1997 and now licensed worldwide by Sanofi Pasteur has been approved for use in Mexico. Dengvaxia is the world's first vaccine approved to prevent dengue fever, which is a virus spread by mosquitoes primarily in tropical and sub-tropical areas. [More]
Scientists find effective antiviral mechanisms to inhibit chikungunya virus

Scientists find effective antiviral mechanisms to inhibit chikungunya virus

Scientists looking at the antiviral mechanisms of two previously identified human monoclonal antibodies have found they potently inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV) at multiple stages of infection. [More]
Lilly, Merck announce another immuno-oncology collaboration

Lilly, Merck announce another immuno-oncology collaboration

Eli Lilly and Company and Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced another immuno-oncology collaboration that will evaluate abemaciclib (LY2835219), Lilly's cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 inhibitor, and Merck's KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab) in a Phase I study across multiple tumor types. [More]
Bacteriophage-based method may improve efficiency of bacteria detectors

Bacteriophage-based method may improve efficiency of bacteria detectors

Viruses that attack bacteria - bacteriophages - can be fussy: they only inject their genetic material into the bacteria that suit them. The fussiness of bacteriophages can be exploited in order to detect specific species of bacteria. Scientists from Warsaw have just demonstrated that bacteriophage-based biosensors will be much more efficient if prior to the deposition on the surface of the bacteriophage sensor their orientation is ordered in electric field. [More]
Biotypes can identify distinct subgroups of psychosis

Biotypes can identify distinct subgroups of psychosis

Three biomarker-based categories, called biotypes, outperformed traditional diagnoses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis, in sorting psychosis cases into distinct subgroups on the basis of brain biology, report researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
UGA researchers identify biological markers for mental disorders

UGA researchers identify biological markers for mental disorders

A team of researchers led by faculty at the University of Georgia has identified a number of biological markers that make it possible to classify mental disorders with greater precision. Their findings, published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, may one day lead to improved diagnostics and treatments for those suffering from mental illness. [More]
Oxitec prepares to increase supplies of OX513A to address recent outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil

Oxitec prepares to increase supplies of OX513A to address recent outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil

Intrexon Corporation, a leader in synthetic biology, today announced that Oxitec, a UK-based subsidiary of the Company, is prepared to increase supplies of its proprietary mosquito control solution, OX513A, through its Brazil facilities to assist Brazil in addressing the recent devastating outbreak of the Zika virus and other diseases transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. [More]
Kanuma approved as first treatment for patients with LAL deficiency

Kanuma approved as first treatment for patients with LAL deficiency

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Kanuma (sebelipase alfa) as the first treatment for patients with a rare disease known as lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency. [More]
Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease, particularly asthma and hay fever, have about twice the rate of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, setting them on a course for heart disease at a surprisingly early age, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Plasmacytoid dendritic cells may not contribute to late-stage lupus

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells may not contribute to late-stage lupus

For years, biomedical researchers have suspected that a specific set of immune cells are responsible for causing disease in lupus patients, but until now they haven't known for sure one way or the other. [More]
Prophylactic antibiotics reduce risk of serious bacterial infections in children with ALL

Prophylactic antibiotics reduce risk of serious bacterial infections in children with ALL

Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in children during the critical first month of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer, according to a U.S. and Canadian study led by investigators from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. [More]
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