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NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

A novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine discovered and developed by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University is being evaluated in an NIH-sponsored Phase 1, first-in-human, clinical trial at Duke University. Although several early-stage West Nile virus vaccine clinical trials have been completed to date, no human vaccine has been approved for commercial use. [More]
ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare today announced the start of a Phase III clinical trial programme to evaluate the safety and efficacy of dolutegravir (Tivicay) and rilpivirine (Edurant) as maintenance therapy for adult patients with HIV. [More]
Researchers reveal potential mode of drug resistance in malaria parasites

Researchers reveal potential mode of drug resistance in malaria parasites

Scientists have uncovered a potential mode of parasite drug resistance in malaria infection, according to a report published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Use of fresh whole blood from single donors may reduce complications in pediatric heart surgery patients

Use of fresh whole blood from single donors may reduce complications in pediatric heart surgery patients

Using fresh whole blood from single donors is better than using component blood from multiple donors in pediatric heart surgery patients, according to an article in the May 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
ITIM-containing receptor crucial for development of acute myeloid leukemia

ITIM-containing receptor crucial for development of acute myeloid leukemia

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have discovered that a certain class of receptors that inhibit immune response are crucial for the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common acute leukemia affecting adults. [More]
Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Researchers from the Children's Hospital at Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine will present data from more than 50 studies that explore topics including obesity, asthma and autism at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies. [More]
NanoViricides' anti-viral drug candidates show promise in lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection

NanoViricides' anti-viral drug candidates show promise in lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection

NanoViricides, Inc., a nanomedicine company developing anti-viral drugs, discusses the significance of the strong effectiveness demonstrated by its anti-viral drug candidates in a lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection. [More]
Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

A new, randomized clinical study co-authored by Cohen Children's Medical Center's chair of pediatrics says there is little neurological benefit to using therapeutic hypothermia to lower a child's core temperature after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. [More]
Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. [More]
Multicentre study provides hope for malaria therapy with just one dose

Multicentre study provides hope for malaria therapy with just one dose

Approximately 584,000 people worldwide die of malaria each year. The epidemic strongly associated with poverty claims most of its victims in Africa, where it particularly affects the weakest, children and pregnant women. Current therapies have to be taken over several days to be effective against malaria. [More]
WHO calls on global health community to address significant gaps in prevention, treatment of malaria

WHO calls on global health community to address significant gaps in prevention, treatment of malaria

WHO is calling on the global health community to urgently address significant gaps in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Despite dramatic declines in malaria cases and deaths since 2000, more than half a million lives are still lost to this preventable disease each year. [More]
New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks

New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks

Tick-borne diseases are a major public health problem around the world. Ticks carry and transmit a variety of microbes that cause disease. These illnesses, which include Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Tularemia, can cause a variety of symptoms, often serious and sometimes deadly. [More]
French clinicians diagnose first case of rabies since 2003

French clinicians diagnose first case of rabies since 2003

A team of French clinicians has diagnosed the first case of rabies in that country since 2003. Only 20 cases of human rabies had been diagnosed in France between 1970 and 2003. Moreover, the patient was unaware of having been bitten. [More]
Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. presented data from a 52-week, open-label extension study (PREVAIL OLE) showing that Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules offered a long-term adjunctive treatment option with a favorable tolerability profile for a high proportion of patients with refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). [More]
Experimental immune therapy generally safe, well-tolerated in women with triple-negative breast cancer

Experimental immune therapy generally safe, well-tolerated in women with triple-negative breast cancer

Early data in a preliminary human study show that an experimental immune system drug is generally safe and well tolerated in women with metastatic, triple-negative breast cancer, a persistently difficult form of the disease to treat. [More]
Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) data presented yesterday by Pharmacyclics, Inc. at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting suggest that ibrutinib may be an effective therapeutic option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), as shown in both a transgenic mouse model and an in-vivo model of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice (grafts of tissue taken from a pancreatic cancer patient and grafted into a mouse). [More]
Focus Diagnostics announces FDA clearance for Simplexa Group A Strep Direct Kit

Focus Diagnostics announces FDA clearance for Simplexa Group A Strep Direct Kit

Focus Diagnostics, the clinical-laboratory products business of Quest Diagnostics, today announced the FDA 510(k) clearance and CLIA moderate-complexity categorization for its Simplexa Group A Strep Direct Kit. Simplexa Group A Strep Direct is a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Group A Streptococcus bacteria directly from throat swabs. [More]
Fewer patients take effective gout drug after steep price increase

Fewer patients take effective gout drug after steep price increase

Study finds that fewer patients with gout received useful colchicine drug after FDA actions led to 50x increase in price. [More]
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