Fever News and Research RSS Feed - Fever News and Research

Frail elderly people are at increased risk of death from outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis

Frail elderly people are at increased risk of death from outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis

Frail elderly people living in residential care facilities are at increased risk of severe illness or death from outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis. [More]
WHO to highlight increasing threat of vector-borne diseases on World Health Day 2014

WHO to highlight increasing threat of vector-borne diseases on World Health Day 2014

More than half the world's population is at risk from diseases such as malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease, schistosomiasis, and yellow fever, carried by mosquitoes, flies, ticks, water snails and other vectors. Every year, more than one billion people are infected and more than one million die from vector-borne diseases. [More]

Physician offers tips to prevent tick bites

Warmer temperatures and longer days beckon outdoors enthusiasts and gardeners alike to get out and enjoy the season. [More]
Study of non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve shows strong results

Study of non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve shows strong results

The first post-FDA approval study of a non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve showed strong short- and mid-term results for the device in patients with certain congenital heart defects, according to research presented by a U-M pediatric interventional cardiologist at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session Sunday. [More]
Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

The most frequently used mechanical circulatory assist device in the world may have untapped potential, physicians say. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

The outbreak of dengue fever that infected some 20 people in Florida's Martin County late last year unnerved many who feared the tropical disease had once again established a foothold in Florida. The last outbreaks occurred in 2009 and 2010 in Key West—before that, the disease hadn't struck Florida in more than 70 years. [More]
CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with health officials in Missouri and Tennessee have identified six new cases of people sick with Heartland virus: five in Missouri and one in Tennessee. The new cases, discovered in 2012 and 2013, are described today in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xolair (omalizumab) for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria, a form of chronic hives. [More]
New national research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections

New national research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections

Viral infections with limited or no treatment options can pose a major global health threat, but a new national research consortium centered at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is focused on the discovery of new and better drug therapies as these viruses emerge. [More]

NIH awarded five-year grant of up to $28 million to fight deadly Ebola virus

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a five-year grant of up to $28 million to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody "cocktail" to fight the deadly Ebola virus. [More]
NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year, $28 million grant to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody "cocktail" to fight two types of viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever, including the deadly Ebola virus. The project involves researchers from 15 institutions, including Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Einstein will receive approximately $4 million of the total grant. [More]
Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

The focus of his team was also on samples, in which the bacteria failed to respond to the agent. They discovered two types of resistance. "Spontaneous mutations can occur in the gene for dihydrofolate reductase rendering trimethoprim no longer able to attack the changed enzyme, which means it becomes ineffective," Nitsche-Schmitz explained. [More]
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Viewpoints: The lesson from Florida's special election; hospital deaths; costs of treating hep C

Viewpoints: The lesson from Florida's special election; hospital deaths; costs of treating hep C

But in recent months, the political landscape has grown bleaker [for Democrats] .... The question, of course, is why so many Republicans turned out [in the Florida special election last week] and why so few Democrats did. The answer among strategists on both sides was: Obamacare. But not in the sense that the healthcare law is so unpopular that Democrats are doomed; in fact, as more people sign up for health coverage, polls suggest that Obamacare is a little less toxic now than it was last fall. Instead, the problem is that a high-decibel debate over Obamacare has the effect of prompting conservatives to come out and vote, but not liberals (Doyle McManus, 3/16). [More]
Pierre Fabre Dermatologie receives FDA marketing authorization for pediatric drug Hemangeol

Pierre Fabre Dermatologie receives FDA marketing authorization for pediatric drug Hemangeol

Pierre Fabre Dermatologie has obtained marketing authorization from the FDA for the pediatric drug Hemangeol (propranolol hydrochloride), which is the first and only approved treatment for "proliferating infantile hemangioma requiring systemic therapy". [More]
Researchers develop therapy to attack cervical cancer tumors

Researchers develop therapy to attack cervical cancer tumors

One of the most promising technologies for the treatment of various cancers is nanotechnology, creating drugs that directly attack the cancer cells without damaging other tissues' development. [More]
L. reuteri Protectis reduces diarrhea, respiratory tract infections in healthy children

L. reuteri Protectis reduces diarrhea, respiratory tract infections in healthy children

Healthy children attending day-care centres have a significantly lower risk of getting diarrhoea or respiratory tract infections when given a daily supplement of Lactobacillus reuteri Protectis, a study in 336 children shows. "Our study confirms earlier published data in proving that preventive use of L. reuteri Protectis in healthy children reduces diarrhoeic episodes. [More]
Merck's NOXAFIL injection gets FDA approval for intravenous use

Merck's NOXAFIL injection gets FDA approval for intravenous use

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved NOXAFIL (posaconazole) injection (18 mg/ mL), a new formulation of NOXAFIL for intravenous (IV) use. [More]

Researcher detects higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed soy formula

A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has detected a higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed infant formula containing soy protein rather than milk protein. [More]
Aradigm reports record revenue of $4.6M in fourth quarter 2013

Aradigm reports record revenue of $4.6M in fourth quarter 2013

Aradigm Corporation (the "Company") today announced financial results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2013. [More]