Fever News and Research RSS Feed - Fever News and Research

NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year, $28 million grant to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody "cocktail" to fight two types of viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever, including the deadly Ebola virus. The project involves researchers from 15 institutions, including Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Einstein will receive approximately $4 million of the total grant. [More]
Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

Trimethoprim is more effective against streptococci than expected, says research

The focus of his team was also on samples, in which the bacteria failed to respond to the agent. They discovered two types of resistance. "Spontaneous mutations can occur in the gene for dihydrofolate reductase rendering trimethoprim no longer able to attack the changed enzyme, which means it becomes ineffective," Nitsche-Schmitz explained. [More]
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Viewpoints: The lesson from Florida's special election; hospital deaths; costs of treating hep C

Viewpoints: The lesson from Florida's special election; hospital deaths; costs of treating hep C

But in recent months, the political landscape has grown bleaker [for Democrats] .... The question, of course, is why so many Republicans turned out [in the Florida special election last week] and why so few Democrats did. The answer among strategists on both sides was: Obamacare. But not in the sense that the healthcare law is so unpopular that Democrats are doomed; in fact, as more people sign up for health coverage, polls suggest that Obamacare is a little less toxic now than it was last fall. Instead, the problem is that a high-decibel debate over Obamacare has the effect of prompting conservatives to come out and vote, but not liberals (Doyle McManus, 3/16). [More]
Pierre Fabre Dermatologie receives FDA marketing authorization for pediatric drug Hemangeol

Pierre Fabre Dermatologie receives FDA marketing authorization for pediatric drug Hemangeol

Pierre Fabre Dermatologie has obtained marketing authorization from the FDA for the pediatric drug Hemangeol (propranolol hydrochloride), which is the first and only approved treatment for "proliferating infantile hemangioma requiring systemic therapy". [More]
Researchers develop therapy to attack cervical cancer tumors

Researchers develop therapy to attack cervical cancer tumors

One of the most promising technologies for the treatment of various cancers is nanotechnology, creating drugs that directly attack the cancer cells without damaging other tissues' development. [More]
L. reuteri Protectis reduces diarrhea, respiratory tract infections in healthy children

L. reuteri Protectis reduces diarrhea, respiratory tract infections in healthy children

Healthy children attending day-care centres have a significantly lower risk of getting diarrhoea or respiratory tract infections when given a daily supplement of Lactobacillus reuteri Protectis, a study in 336 children shows. "Our study confirms earlier published data in proving that preventive use of L. reuteri Protectis in healthy children reduces diarrhoeic episodes. [More]
Merck's NOXAFIL injection gets FDA approval for intravenous use

Merck's NOXAFIL injection gets FDA approval for intravenous use

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved NOXAFIL (posaconazole) injection (18 mg/ mL), a new formulation of NOXAFIL for intravenous (IV) use. [More]

Researcher detects higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed soy formula

A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has detected a higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed infant formula containing soy protein rather than milk protein. [More]
Aradigm reports record revenue of $4.6M in fourth quarter 2013

Aradigm reports record revenue of $4.6M in fourth quarter 2013

Aradigm Corporation (the "Company") today announced financial results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Notre Dame biologists awarded $23M research grant to prevent malaria and dengue fever

Notre Dame biologists awarded $23M research grant to prevent malaria and dengue fever

Notre Dame biologists Nicole Achee and Neil Lobo are leaders of an international $23 million research grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Their five-year project will generate the data required to show the effectiveness of a new paradigm in mosquito control -spatial repellency - for the prevention of two important mosquito-borne diseases: malaria and dengue fever. [More]

UTSA College of Sciences faculty members honored at 2014 Annual Meeting of AAAS

​UTSA College of Sciences faculty members Andrew Tsin, Garry Cole and Donald Kurtz were honored recently at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Chicago. [More]
Antares Pharma announces launch of OTREXUP to Dermatologists

Antares Pharma announces launch of OTREXUP to Dermatologists

Antares Pharma, Inc. today announced LEO Pharma's launch of OTREXUP to Dermatologists, the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved subcutaneous (SC) methotrexate (MTX) product for once weekly self-administration with an easy-to-use, single dose, disposable auto injector. [More]

Scientists develop new nasal filter that helps people with nasal symptoms from seasonal hay fever

​A small filter the size of a contact lens could possibly make life easier for some of the estimated 500 million people worldwide who suffer from itching, sneezing and a runny nose as soon as the pollen season starts. [More]
Incyte Corporation publishes results of Phase III trial of ruxolitinib in patients with polycythemia vera

Incyte Corporation publishes results of Phase III trial of ruxolitinib in patients with polycythemia vera

Incyte Corporation (Nasdaq: INCY) today announced that a pivotal Phase III trial of ruxolitinib compared to best available therapy in patients with polycythemia vera who are resistant to or intolerant of hydroxyurea has met its primary endpoint of achieving phlebotomy independence and reducing spleen size by 35 percent or more. [More]
Researchers look at health threat to pregnant women with history of Kawasaki disease

Researchers look at health threat to pregnant women with history of Kawasaki disease

In the first study of its type, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have looked at the health threat to pregnant women with a history of Kawasaki disease (KD), concluding that the risks are low with informed management and care. [More]
Researchers awarded $26M NIH grant to advance treatments for Ebola and Marburg

Researchers awarded $26M NIH grant to advance treatments for Ebola and Marburg

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Profectus Biosciences, Tekmira Pharmaceuticals and the Vanderbilt University Medical Center have been awarded up to $26 million to advance treatments of the highly lethal hemorrhagic fever viruses Ebola and Marburg. [More]
Small-molecule drug effective in protecting nonhuman primates from lethal Marburg virus

Small-molecule drug effective in protecting nonhuman primates from lethal Marburg virus

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated the effectiveness of a small-molecule drug in protecting nonhuman primates from the lethal Marburg virus. Their work, published online in the journal Nature, is the result of a continuing collaboration between Army scientists and industry partners that also shows promise for treating a broad range of other viral diseases. [More]

Dendreon plans to make PROVENGE available in Europe

Dendreon Corporation today announced that it plans to make PROVENGE (autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated with PAP-GM-CSF or sipuleucel-T) available in Europe, beginning with Germany and the United Kingdom. [More]
Study raises concerns about use of acetaminophen during pregnancy

Study raises concerns about use of acetaminophen during pregnancy

Acetaminophen, found in over-the-counter products such as Excedrin and Tylenol, provides many people with relief from headaches and sore muscles. When used appropriately, it is considered mostly harmless. Over recent decades, the drug, which has been marketed since the 1950s, has become the medication most commonly used by pregnant women for fevers and pain. [More]