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ESA supports implementation of national strategy to control tick-borne diseases

The Entomological Society of America (ESA) recently released a statement supporting the creation and implementation of a national strategy using Integrated Tick Management to better control tick populations and reduce the rapidly escalating impact of tick-borne diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, and Lyme disease. [More]
Legal-Bay reports that death toll from Legionnaires' disease outbreak in South Bronx rises to 7

Legal-Bay reports that death toll from Legionnaires' disease outbreak in South Bronx rises to 7

Legal-Bay LLC, The Lawsuit Settlement Funding Company, reports that in the tragic Legionnaires' disease outbreak sweeping the South Bronx, 81 cases have been reported as of now, with a total of 7 people dead as a result. According to NYC health officials, 81 cases have been reported in total, with 64 of those requiring hospitalization, and the death roll has recently risen to 7. [More]
Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

National Institutes of Health scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if given three days prior. [More]
Children increase parents’ risk for viral infection

Children increase parents’ risk for viral infection

The BIG LoVE (Utah Better Identification of Germs-Longitudinal Viral Epidemiology) study, led by scientists at the University of Utah School of Medicine, finds that each bundle of joy puts the entire household at increased risk for infection with viruses that cause colds, flu, and other respiratory illnesses. [More]
Coordinated, two-part approach could help reduce hospital-acquired infections

Coordinated, two-part approach could help reduce hospital-acquired infections

By coordinating with state health departments and communicating with each other about patients with C. difficile and antibiotic-resistant infections, hospitals, long-term acute-care facilities and nursing homes could reduce the number of such hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) by an estimated 619,000 cases in the next five years, a new Centers for Disease Control 9 (CDC)-led report has found. [More]
Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines - creating immunity without vaccination. [More]
Tests show VSV-ZEBOV vaccine safe and effective against Ebola

Tests show VSV-ZEBOV vaccine safe and effective against Ebola

Tests of the experimental Ebola vaccine VSV-ZEBOV in over 7500 participants in Guinea suggest that the vaccine provides high protection against the disease as early as ten days after vaccination, in adults who have potentially been exposed to the virus by coming in close contact with a recently infected person. [More]
Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

MS relapses are typically reflective of new neurological symptoms. However, it can be a worsening of neurologic symptoms that begins after a patient has been stable (generally for about 30 days), but relapses are persistent and consistent changes in symptoms that occur for more than 24 to 48 hours. [More]
Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Controlling mosquitoes that carry human diseases is a global health challenge as their ability to resist insecticides now threatens efforts to prevent epidemics. Scientists from the CNRS, IRD, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in French Guiana have identified new genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides, which could improve its detection in the field. [More]
Amgen announces submission of supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Kyprolis (carfilzomib)

Amgen announces submission of supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Kyprolis (carfilzomib)

Amgen today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection to seek an expanded indication for the treatment of patients with a form of blood cancer, relapsed multiple myeloma, who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor (TCR) therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT). [More]
Heidelberg University scientists gain new insight into cytotoxic effect of Ebola virus

Heidelberg University scientists gain new insight into cytotoxic effect of Ebola virus

In the course of basic research in membrane biochemistry scientists at Heidelberg University have gained new insight into the cytotoxic effect of the Ebola virus. Employing biochemical and cell biological methods they have shed light on the molecular relationships between the Ebola glycoprotein and its role in mediating cytotoxicity. [More]
Tips to prevent, treat black widow and brown recluse spider bites

Tips to prevent, treat black widow and brown recluse spider bites

Most spiders are non-venomous and most spider bites are harmless. They may cause some local redness and pain, but can usually be managed at home by washing, applying ice and keeping the area clean. [More]
TGen, NAU to jointly develop quick, affordable and accurate test to diagnose Lyme disease

TGen, NAU to jointly develop quick, affordable and accurate test to diagnose Lyme disease

Focus On Lyme, an initiative sponsored by the Leadership Children's Foundation of Gilbert, Ariz., has donated $75,000 to the Translational Genomics Research Institute to support research into the development of a quick, affordable and accurate method of diagnosing Lyme disease. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
UVA Children's Hospital finds potential cause of child paralysis outbreak

UVA Children's Hospital finds potential cause of child paralysis outbreak

A mysterious outbreak of child paralysis cases previously linked to enterovirus D68 may instead have another cause, doctors at the University of Virginia Children's Hospital are cautioning after determining that a stricken child appeared to be suffering from a different virus. [More]
FDA grants CLIA waiver for Alere i Strep A test

FDA grants CLIA waiver for Alere i Strep A test

Alere Inc., a global leader in rapid diagnostic tests, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted CLIA waiver for the Alere i Strep A test. The test, which was cleared for marketing by the FDA in April 2015, is the first molecular platform that detects Group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria in 8 minutes or less. [More]
Study shows that 14-3-3 sigma opposes, reverses tumor-promoting metabolic programs

Study shows that 14-3-3 sigma opposes, reverses tumor-promoting metabolic programs

Every parent knows the maxim "feed a cold, starve a fever." In cancer, however, exactly how to feed or starve a tumor has not been easy to determine. [More]
Hyperbaric oxygen treatment effective for fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment effective for fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is almost impossible to diagnose. The chronic pain syndrome strikes an estimated 1 in 70 Americans, most of them women. The disorder is often triggered by head trauma, a neurological infection, or severe emotional stress, and is characterized by symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, memory loss and mood swings. Fibromyalgia is often mistaken for other culprits and most patients suffer months, even years, of unrelenting pain before being properly diagnosed. And once diagnosed, patients enjoy little respite because few therapies have been found to be effective in assuaging its symptoms. [More]
IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

Today AbbVie announced the European Commission granted marketing authorization for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) as the first treatment option available in all 28 member states of the European Union for the treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare, slow growing blood cancer, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, or in first line treatment for patients unsuitable for chemo-immunotherapy. [More]
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