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Dengue vaccine may worsen infections if used in areas with low rates of disease

Dengue vaccine may worsen infections if used in areas with low rates of disease

The world's only licensed vaccine for dengue may worsen subsequent dengue infections if used in areas with low rates of dengue infection, suggests new research. [More]
Early life use of antibiotics linked to higher risk of developing allergies later in life

Early life use of antibiotics linked to higher risk of developing allergies later in life

Research presented today (6 September, 2016) at this year's European Respiratory Society International Congress in London, UK shows that exposure to antibiotics early in life is related to increased risk of developing allergies later in life. [More]
New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever

Potential outbreaks of diseases such as Ebola and Lassa fever may be more accurately predicted thanks to a new mathematical model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. [More]
Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Sepsis, according to the new clinical definition of sepsis, is organ dysfunction caused by the body’s dysregulated response to an infection. Sepsis is common, with about 20 million patients/year in the developed world. It can escalate to septic shock, which is a life-threatening condition with a mortality rate of about 40%. In fact, about every second someone in the world dies of sepsis. [More]
Early diagnosis and treatment key to surviving sepsis

Early diagnosis and treatment key to surviving sepsis

Every minute, someone comes into a hospital emergency department in the United States with sepsis, a life-threatening over-response to infection that damages tissues and organs. [More]
Approved dengue vaccine may increase infection in certain settings, research suggests

Approved dengue vaccine may increase infection in certain settings, research suggests

The only approved vaccine for dengue may actually increase the incidence of dengue infections requiring hospitalization rather than preventing the disease if health officials aren't careful about where they vaccinate, new public health research published Sept. 2 in Science suggests. [More]
Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic will offer the Zika virus antibody test developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Official statistics may underestimate size of Zika epidemic, study suggests

Official statistics may underestimate size of Zika epidemic, study suggests

A study supported by FAPESP and coordinated by researchers at the São José do Rio Preto Medical School in São Paulo State, Brazil, suggests official statistics may underestimate the size of the epidemic caused by Zika virus. [More]
Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

International tourism exceeds 1.2 billion persons each year, with more than 20 percent of travelers reporting some type of illness. [More]
Respiratory viral infection triggering asthma attack in children linked to treatment failure

Respiratory viral infection triggering asthma attack in children linked to treatment failure

The results of a study conducted by Dr. Francine Ducharme, Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Montreal, published in the medical journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, confirm that respiratory viral detection, not child's age, explains the high rate of hospitalization for asthma attacks in children under six. [More]
New research shows female mosquitoes can pass Zika virus to their offsprings

New research shows female mosquitoes can pass Zika virus to their offsprings

New research from The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston has shown that female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can pass the Zika virus to their eggs and offspring. [More]
Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Figures published by Public Health England have shown that the number of diagnosed Rotavirus cases, a highly infectious virus which may cause vomiting and diarrhoea, have dropped by 84% since the introduction of a vaccine to the national childhood immunisation schedule in July 2013. [More]
Leading Chikungunya vaccine in clinical trial phase 2

Leading Chikungunya vaccine in clinical trial phase 2

With the first patient vaccinated, a Phase 2 clinical trial of a promising prophylactic vaccine candidate against Chikungunya fever has now commenced. The product is the most advanced Chikungunya vaccine candidate globally and is developed by the Austrian biotech company Themis Bioscience GmbH. [More]
Biostatisticians project nearly 400 non-travel Zika cases in Florida by end of summer

Biostatisticians project nearly 400 non-travel Zika cases in Florida by end of summer

Nearly 400 non travel-related Zika infections will occur in Florida before the end of the summer, according to new projections by biostatisticians at the University of Florida and other institutions. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
Engineers use light to print 3-D shape-memory materials

Engineers use light to print 3-D shape-memory materials

Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes. [More]
Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

Fiocruz to start phase II clinical trials of novel vaccine for schistosomiasis

The Oswaldo Cruz Foundation at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, will start the phase II clinical trials of a vaccine for schistosomiasis, called 'Sm14 Vaccine'. [More]
Nurse-driven protocols can shorten length of stay for patients in emergency department

Nurse-driven protocols can shorten length of stay for patients in emergency department

Protocols allowing nurses to administer certain types of treatment in the emergency department can dramatically shorten length of stay for patients with fever, chest pain, hip fractures and vaginal bleeding during pregnancy, according to the results of a study published earlier this month in Annals of Emergency Medicine. [More]
Scientists isolate new multicomponent virus from mosquitoes

Scientists isolate new multicomponent virus from mosquitoes

Scientists have identified a new "multicomponent" virus -- one containing different segments of genetic material in separate particles -- that can infect animals, according to research published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. [More]
Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
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