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Investigators define prevalence, associated factors for vasospasm in children with brain injuries

Investigators define prevalence, associated factors for vasospasm in children with brain injuries

Vasospasm, or severe narrowing of blood vessels, is a dangerous complication observed in children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. In a paper recently published in Critical Care Medicine, investigators at Nationwide Children's Hospital have further defined the prevalence, associated factors and time course for vasospasm in children with these brain injuries. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists are trying to deliver a stern wake-up call to the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. [More]
Study: Airport screening for disease often misses infected travellers, but can be improved

Study: Airport screening for disease often misses infected travellers, but can be improved

Scientists have shown that airport screening for disease will often miss half or more of infected travellers, but can be improved by customizing to pathogens. [More]
New Duke-NUS-led study identifies super-potent antibody that can neutralize dengue virus

New Duke-NUS-led study identifies super-potent antibody that can neutralize dengue virus

A new Duke-NUS-led study has identified a super-potent antibody which requires a minute amount to neutralize the dengue virus. [More]
Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

A new study developed at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. [More]
New study links chicken pox and shingles virus to giant cell arteritis in elderly

New study links chicken pox and shingles virus to giant cell arteritis in elderly

A new study links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. The study is published in the February 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The condition can cause sudden blindness or stroke and can be life-threatening. [More]
Fusobacterium necrophorum often causes severe sore throats in young adults

Fusobacterium necrophorum often causes severe sore throats in young adults

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggests that Fusobacterium necrophorum more often causes severe sore throats in young adults than streptococcus — the cause of the much better known strep throat. [More]
ASU to host inaugural meeting for brand new scientific society in Tempe, Arizona

ASU to host inaugural meeting for brand new scientific society in Tempe, Arizona

Arizona State University will host a premiere opportunity to engage and mingle with luminaries in the burgeoning field of evolutionary medicine, a new interdisciplinary approach that is becoming an essential perspective in our view of disease, today's medical practice and the worldwide impact on public health as it hosts the Inaugural International Society for Evolution, Medicine & Public Health Meeting, March 19-21, 2015 in Tempe, Arizona. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

In a paper just published in the peer reviewed journal Infection, Ecology & Epidemiology, researchers report discovering the first evidence of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) in the wild rat population in the Netherlands. The discovery comes on the heels of similar ones in France, Belgium and the United Kingdom in recent years, and has some researchers concerned about the potential spread of the virus to humans. [More]
Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts, such as West Nile virus and Ebola, is a predictable result of climate change, says a noted zoologist affiliated with the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. [More]
Cumberland initiates clinical development of Boxaban (ifetroban) oral capsule for AERD treatment

Cumberland initiates clinical development of Boxaban (ifetroban) oral capsule for AERD treatment

Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced an expansion of its pipeline with a new Phase II development program. The Company has initiated the clinical development of Boxaban (ifetroban) oral capsule for the treatment of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). [More]
Single genomic change can make beneficial bacteria into pathogenic bacteria

Single genomic change can make beneficial bacteria into pathogenic bacteria

We, as most animals, host many different beneficial bacteria. Being beneficial to the host often pays off for the bacteria, as success of the host determines the survival and spread of the microbe. But if bacteria grow too much they may become deadly. [More]
Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced positive topline safety and tolerability results from a Phase 1b clinical trial of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and secondary antibiotic-resistant infections in patients receiving intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. [More]
Researchers study epidemiology of Ebola Virus Disease to prevent future disease outbreaks

Researchers study epidemiology of Ebola Virus Disease to prevent future disease outbreaks

Now, researchers from Arizona State University and Georgia State University are trying to better understand the epidemiology and control of Ebola Virus Disease in order to alleviate suffering and prevent future disease outbreaks from reaching the catastrophic proportions of the current crisis. [More]
Researchers assess causes of febrile illnesses in Tanzanian children

Researchers assess causes of febrile illnesses in Tanzanian children

Valérie D'Acremont led the research team from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel and the Policlinique Médicale Universitaire in Lausanne, who systematically assessed the causes of febrile illnesses in Tanzanian children. According to the published paper, in most cases a treatment with antimalarials or antibiotics is not required. [More]
Sign/symptom-based measures could help patients receive timely care

Sign/symptom-based measures could help patients receive timely care

An examination of process measures endorsed by the National Quality Forum finds that these measures focus predominantly on management of patients with established diagnoses, and that quality measures for patient presenting symptoms often do not reflect the most common reasons patients seek care, according to a study in the February 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, and Jeffrey A. Rivest, MS, President and Chief Executive Officer of University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), today announced the official launch of a new "Program in Lung Healing," that will further the School's position as a national leader in research, education and clinical innovation for acute ailments of the lung and respiratory system. [More]
Infectious diseases expert discusses the myths and facts about measles outbreak

Infectious diseases expert discusses the myths and facts about measles outbreak

Measles, a highly contagious respiratory infection that causes serious complications in about 3 of 10 people, has been grabbing headlines since last December's outbreak at Disneyland. In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 102 cases of measles in 14 states. One unconfirmed case was just reported in New Jersey. Measured against the approximately 600 cases reported in 2014, this year is on track to set a record for a disease that was declared eradicated in the United States in 2000. [More]
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