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Fibrosis is the growth of fibrous tissue.

OECD publishes novel knowledge management tools for advancing non-animal testing methods

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has recently published the first five adverse outcome pathways (AOP), three of which have been developed by the European Commission's science and knowledge service, the Joint Research Centre. [More]
Non-contrast MRA can be viable diagnostic alternative for patients with chronic kidney disease

Non-contrast MRA can be viable diagnostic alternative for patients with chronic kidney disease

Patients with diabetes or renal failure are at high risk for deadly and debilitating vascular diseases, however, the most common imaging tool to evaluate the blood vessels uses a contrast agent that can further damage the kidneys. [More]
Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. They also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task. [More]
Aflatoxin exposure can weaken airways' defenses opening door for severe respiratory diseases

Aflatoxin exposure can weaken airways' defenses opening door for severe respiratory diseases

Toxins from mold found growing on nuts or corn can weaken the airways' self-clearing mechanisms and immunity, opening the door for respiratory diseases and exacerbating existing ones, suggests a study in Nature Scientific Reports published this month from otolaryngology researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by Radboud university medical center/CWZ and Wageningen University & Research. [More]
Veracyte announces new data suggesting ability of Afirma GEC in thyroid cancer diagnosis

Veracyte announces new data suggesting ability of Afirma GEC in thyroid cancer diagnosis

Veracyte, Inc.today announced new data suggesting the potential to enhance the performance of the Afirma Gene Expression Classifier in thyroid cancer diagnosis by combining the test's proven RNA expression-based capabilities with gene variant and fusion information – all on a single, robust RNA sequencing platform. [More]
New survey shows majority of patients happy with how physicians manage discussion on IPF diagnosis

New survey shows majority of patients happy with how physicians manage discussion on IPF diagnosis

A diagnosis of IPF is news that few patients want to hear from their physician, but the reality is that approximately 3 million people worldwide are living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

Britons are officially three times more likely to die of the incurable lung condition idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), than in a road accident. Despite this, the disease is so unheard of and underfunded in research doctors still don’t know what causes it. [More]
Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

An article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine updates the medical community on a potentially devastating liver disease that afflicts approximately 29,000 Americans. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents’ opinions on treatment decisions for children

University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents’ opinions on treatment decisions for children

A University of Melbourne ethicist is encouraging doctors to recognise the autonomy of parents, even if this could mean “less than optimal” treatment decisions for their children. [More]
Charity funding awarded to new study aiming to prevent kidney damage in patients with diabetes

Charity funding awarded to new study aiming to prevent kidney damage in patients with diabetes

Charity funding has been awarded for a major new study which will aim to prevent glucose-induced damage to kidney function in people with diabetes. [More]
Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

A minor hiccup in the sequence of a human gene can have devastating impacts on health. Such flaws cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease affecting the lungs and other vital organs, often leading to death by the age of 30. [More]
Viral vector-based approaches could improve effectiveness of CFTR gene therapy

Viral vector-based approaches could improve effectiveness of CFTR gene therapy

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by accumulation of thick mucus in the lungs and is associated with a high incidence of bacterial infection. Mutations in the gene encoding CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlie the disease. [More]
Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

A novel heart valve replacement method is revealed today that offers hope for the thousands of patients with rheumatic heart disease who need the procedure each year. The research is being presented at the SA Heart Congress 2016 [More]
Study evaluates long-term safety of infants after maternal MRI exposure

Study evaluates long-term safety of infants after maternal MRI exposure

In an analysis that included more than 1.4 million births, exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the first trimester of pregnancy compared with nonexposure was not associated with increased risk of harm to the fetus or in early childhood, although gadolinium MRI at any time during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of a broad set of rheumatological, inflammatory, or skin conditions and, possibly, for stillbirth or neonatal death, according to a study appearing in the September 6 issue of JAMA. [More]
New discovery could potentially lead to treatments for Crohn's disease

New discovery could potentially lead to treatments for Crohn's disease

Scientists at the University of British Columbia have made a discovery that could potentially lead to treatments for a debilitating complication of Crohn's disease. [More]
Myeloid-derived suppressor cells may serve as biomarkers for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells may serve as biomarkers for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research, have discovered that the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is increased in the blood of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently identified compounds that potentially can be used to inhibit Zika virus replication and reduce its ability to kill brain cells. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim and Duke expand collaboration to create largest patient registry for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim and Duke expand collaboration to create largest patient registry for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) announced today the expansion of the Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis – PROspective Outcomes (IPF-PRO) Registry, a patient registry developed to uncover insights into IPF, a rare and serious lung disease. The expansion will increase the study enrollment from 300 patients at 18 study sites to 1,500 patients at approximately 45 sites, creating the largest registry of newly diagnosed IPF patients. [More]
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