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Fibrosis is the growth of fibrous tissue.
GFT505 demonstrates dose-dependent efficacy on primary endpoint in phase 2 NASH trial

GFT505 demonstrates dose-dependent efficacy on primary endpoint in phase 2 NASH trial

GENFIT, today announces topline results of the phase 2 GOLDEN-505 trial in NASH. Due to the unexpected rate of resolution of NASH in patients randomized to placebo who had early NASH (NAS of 3, placebo response rate>57%), along with the high number of sites for a limited sample size, the study as initially designed did not enable the trial to meet directly the primary endpoint. [More]
Regulus' RG-012 receives orphan medicinal product designation in EU for treatment of Alport syndrome

Regulus' RG-012 receives orphan medicinal product designation in EU for treatment of Alport syndrome

Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, announced today that the European Commission has granted orphan medicinal product designation for RG-012, a single stranded, chemically modified oligonucleotide that binds to and inhibits the function of microRNA-21 ("miR-21") for the treatment of Alport syndrome, a life-threatening genetic kidney disease with no approved therapy. [More]
Key finding may point to immediate cause of CF exacerbations

Key finding may point to immediate cause of CF exacerbations

In the genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF), the most severe symptoms are recurring episodes of lung inflammation and bacterial infection (known as "exacerbations") that happen from one to three times a year and cause ever-increasing amounts of lung damage through the course of a CF patient's life. [More]
Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation fare worse than their UK counterparts

Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation fare worse than their UK counterparts

Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis fare markedly worse in the long run than both publicly insured patients in the United Kingdom and privately insured Americans, according to the results of a study conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore and U.K. colleagues working in that nation's government-funded National Health Service. [More]
Male genetic diversity declined due to wealth, power rather than `survival of fittest`

Male genetic diversity declined due to wealth, power rather than `survival of fittest`

The DNA you inherit from your parents contributes to the physical make-up of your body -- whether you have blue eyes or brown, black hair or red, or are male or female. [More]
Cambridge scientists successfully create 'mini-lungs' to study cystic fibrosis

Cambridge scientists successfully create 'mini-lungs' to study cystic fibrosis

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have successfully created 'mini-lungs' using stem cells derived from skin cells of patients with cystic fibrosis, and have shown that these can be used to test potential new drugs for this debilitating lung disease. [More]
Survey: Number of UK adults living with cystic fibrosis expected to increase by 2025

Survey: Number of UK adults living with cystic fibrosis expected to increase by 2025

The number of people living with cystic fibrosis into adulthood in the UK is expected to increase dramatically - by as much as 80 per cent - by 2025, according to a Europe-wide survey, the UK end of which was led by Queen's University Belfast. [More]
Manchester scientists develop enhanced surface for silicone breast implants

Manchester scientists develop enhanced surface for silicone breast implants

Scientists at The University of Manchester have created an enhanced surface for silicone breast implants which could reduce complications and make them less likely to be rejected by the body. [More]
New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts. [More]
New bodily process may explain low blood oxygen levels for cystic fibrosis patients with lung infection

New bodily process may explain low blood oxygen levels for cystic fibrosis patients with lung infection

Researchers have defined a new bodily process in mice that may explain why blood oxygen levels are lower for patients with cystic fibrosis when they get a lung infection. [More]
New research lays groundwork for developing treatments for asthma, COPD

New research lays groundwork for developing treatments for asthma, COPD

In diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the body produces too much mucus, making breathing difficult. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis provides clues to potentially counteract inappropriate mucus production. [More]
New method of testing deadly pathogen could help combat cystic fibrosis

New method of testing deadly pathogen could help combat cystic fibrosis

A new method of testing the most common cause of life-threatening infection in people with cystic fibrosis could improve efforts to study and combat the illness. [More]
Researchers identify promising new approach to treat pulmonary fibrosis

Researchers identify promising new approach to treat pulmonary fibrosis

By uncovering the mechanism by which fibrous tissue cells in the lung multiply, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, along with colleagues in Mexico and Canada, have identified a promising new approach for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Study finds direct evidence of gadolinium deposition in neuronal tissues following contrast-enhanced MRI exams

Study finds direct evidence of gadolinium deposition in neuronal tissues following contrast-enhanced MRI exams

Mayo Clinic research finds direct evidence of gadolinium deposition in neuronal tissues following intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents used in MRI exams. The findings were recently published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Ruthigen, Pulmatrix sign definitive merger agreement

Ruthigen, Pulmatrix sign definitive merger agreement

Ruthigen, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company, and Pulmatrix, Inc., a Lexington, Massachusetts based clinical stage biotechnology company, announced today that on March 13, 2015, they have entered into a definitive merger agreement. [More]
Antibiotic nanoparticles can help treat lung infection, prevent drug resistance

Antibiotic nanoparticles can help treat lung infection, prevent drug resistance

Treating respiratory disease is often difficult because drugs have to cross biological barriers such as respiratory tissue and mucosa, and must therefore be given in large quantities in order for an effective amount to reach the target. [More]
Ember Therapeutics, Mariel Therapeutics sign definitive merger agreement

Ember Therapeutics, Mariel Therapeutics sign definitive merger agreement

Ember Therapeutics, Inc., a Boston-based biotechnology company dedicated to the discovery and development of novel obesity and diabetic related therapies, and Mariel Therapeutics, a privately held, New York-based biotechnology company developing targeted therapies for osteoarthritis and kidney fibrosis using Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)-7, jointly announce today that they have entered into a definitive agreement to merge the two companies. [More]
Preventing lung infections in childhood could help people with cystic fibrosis during adulthood

Preventing lung infections in childhood could help people with cystic fibrosis during adulthood

Preventing lung infections in childhood could stop later life-threatening infections for people with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to the latest research carried out at Aston University. [More]
Finding may help advance experimental approach to improving public health

Finding may help advance experimental approach to improving public health

Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate how cells function, a finding that might help advance an experimental approach to improving public health: DNA vaccines, which could be more efficient, less expensive and easier to store than traditional vaccines. [More]
Study: Omega-3 fatty acids appear to protect heart function among heart attack survivors

Study: Omega-3 fatty acids appear to protect heart function among heart attack survivors

Taking omega-3 fatty acids appeared to lower inflammation and guard against further declines in heart function among recent heart attack survivors already receiving optimal standard care, according to results from a randomized, controlled trial to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. [More]
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