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Fibrosis is the growth of fibrous tissue.
University of Missouri researchers identify key protein component that causes cystic fibrosis

University of Missouri researchers identify key protein component that causes cystic fibrosis

Nearly 70,000 people worldwide are living with cystic fibrosis, a life-threatening genetic disease. There currently is no cure for the condition, but researchers from the University of Missouri have identified a key component in the protein that causes the disease. It is a finding that may lay the foundation for the development of new medications and improved therapies. [More]
Two-drug combination improves lung function in some cystic fibrosis patients

Two-drug combination improves lung function in some cystic fibrosis patients

The combination of two drugs — an investigational drug used in conjunction with an already FDA-approved medication — improved lung function in patients with one form of cystic fibrosis, according to two new studies. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular steps that allow pancreatic cancer to spread to the liver

Researchers reveal molecular steps that allow pancreatic cancer to spread to the liver

An international team led by Weill Cornell Medical College investigators has illuminated the precise molecular steps that enable pancreatic cancer to spread to the liver -- the event that makes the most common form of the disease lethal. By understanding this process, investigators say their discovery can lead to targeted treatments that delay metastasis, and could offer clinicians a new biomarker to test for the earliest signs of pancreatic cancer. [More]
Combined therapy shows promise in cystic fibrosis patients

Combined therapy shows promise in cystic fibrosis patients

Treatment with two medications that target the most common genetic cause of cystic fibrosis improves lung function and lowers the rate of pulmonary exacerbations, according to the results from a Phase III international clinical trial published online in the New England Journal of Medicine on May 17, 2015. [More]
Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis. [More]
Gene therapy is key to addressing Sanfilippo Syndrome, say Ohio scientists and clinicians

Gene therapy is key to addressing Sanfilippo Syndrome, say Ohio scientists and clinicians

Gene therapy is the delivery of DNA into a patient's cells to replace faulty or missing genes—or adds new genes—in an attempt to cure cancer or make changes so the body is better able to fight off disease. Scientists and clinicians have identified a number of different ways to do this, in an effort to correct malfunctioning or mutated genes. Many gene therapy clinical trials are ongoing to assess the safety and potential benefits in patients with rare diseases. [More]
Penn study highlights need for more guidance on contraceptive use in women with cystic fibrosis

Penn study highlights need for more guidance on contraceptive use in women with cystic fibrosis

Only half of women with cystic fibrosis (CF) report using contraception and frequently apt to become pregnant unintentionally, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Adelaide researchers identify target for developing new antibiotics against disease-causing bacteria

Adelaide researchers identify target for developing new antibiotics against disease-causing bacteria

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a target for the development of completely new antibiotics against disease-causing bacteria. [More]
Exalenz Bioscience investigates clinical utility of BreathID test to diagnose NASH

Exalenz Bioscience investigates clinical utility of BreathID test to diagnose NASH

Exalenz Bioscience, a leader in developing and marketing of non-invasive medical devices for diagnosing and monitoring a range of gastrointestinal and liver diseases, today announced the initiation of a clinical study evaluating the potential of its BreathID test to diagnose nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). [More]
Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance to observe fourth annual TSC Global Awareness Day

Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance to observe fourth annual TSC Global Awareness Day

On May 15, the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance (TS Alliance) will join tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) organizations around the world to observe the fourth annual TSC Global Awareness Day. [More]
Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified mutations in two genes that cause a fatal lung scarring disease known as familial pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Scientists test effectiveness of new method for treating COPD

Scientists test effectiveness of new method for treating COPD

Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München have succeeded in testing the effectiveness of new approaches for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on ex vivo 3D human lung tissue cultures (3D-LTCs). The results have now been published in the European Respiratory Journal. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences to present data on ZFP Therapeutic platform at ASGCT meeting

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced that data from clinical, preclinical and research-stage programs focused on the development of ZFP Therapeutics will be presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy [More]
Research findings pave way for development of new treatments for respiratory diseases

Research findings pave way for development of new treatments for respiratory diseases

The research has discovered a link between a vital pumping system that does not function correctly in people with cystic fibrosis and the parasite Toxoplasma. [More]
Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disorder. The study was published April 27 in Nature Communications. [More]
Combination treatment effective for HCV genotype-1 mono-infected patients

Combination treatment effective for HCV genotype-1 mono-infected patients

Results presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that the sofosbuvir (SOF)/daclatasvir (DCV) treatment combination is effective amongst hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype-1 mono-infected patients. These results are significant because whilst other combinations have been widely reported on, there have been few data until now regarding the use of SOF/DCV combination in real world situations. [More]
Occurrence of advanced liver fibrosis similar for patients with HCV infection

Occurrence of advanced liver fibrosis similar for patients with HCV infection

Study results presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that the occurrence of advanced liver fibrosis is similar for patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), whether or not they have been diagnosed. [More]
Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Results from a large population-based cohort of almost a million people in the UK found that the chances of dying from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), over a 14-year period, was approximately 50% higher than for those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]

Study show that silymarin may be a useful treatment for NASH

Results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of silymarin, which is derived from the milk thistle plant, have shown that this herbal remedy may be a useful treatment option for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). [More]
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