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Fibrosis is the growth of fibrous tissue.
Sorrento receives funding to advance immunotherapy targeting WISP1 for treatment of IPF

Sorrento receives funding to advance immunotherapy targeting WISP1 for treatment of IPF

Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: SRNE; Sorrento), a late-stage clinical oncology company developing new treatments for cancer and its associated pain, today announced that it has received funding to advance an immunotherapy targeting WNT1-Inducible Signaling Protein-1 (WISP1) for the potential treatment of IPF, which affects more than 100,000 Americans. [More]
Young people with chronic illnesses face uncertainty when transitioning from pediatric to adult care

Young people with chronic illnesses face uncertainty when transitioning from pediatric to adult care

Young people with chronic illnesses face uncertainty when their care is transferred from pediatrics to adult-oriented health professionals. A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health has found that one in five such young adults said the transfer of their care was unsatisfactory. [More]
Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
AbbVie CF Scholarship program presents annual academic awards to 40 student scholars

AbbVie CF Scholarship program presents annual academic awards to 40 student scholars

AbbVie today announced the 40 outstanding students with cystic fibrosis (CF) who will each receive $2,500 to pursue their undergraduate or graduate school education during the 2014-2015 school year through the AbbVie CF Scholarship program. [More]
UI scientists discover that CF mucus abnormality is present at birth

UI scientists discover that CF mucus abnormality is present at birth

Mucus is key to keeping our lungs clean and clear of bacteria, viruses, and other foreign particles that can cause infection and inflammation. When we inhale microbes and dust, they are trapped in the mucus and then swept up and out of the lungs via a process called mucociliary transport. [More]
New x-ray imaging system helps monitor effectiveness of treatment for cystic fibrosis

New x-ray imaging system helps monitor effectiveness of treatment for cystic fibrosis

Scientists have developed an x-ray imaging system that enables researchers to see 'live' how effective treatments are for cystic fibrosis. [More]
Researchers develop new lung-on-chip model for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges

Researchers develop new lung-on-chip model for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges

Researchers at RTI International, in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, have developed a new lung-on-chip microdevice for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges and therapeutics. The microdevice includes multiple vertically stacked cellular layers that mimic the structure of the airway tissue. [More]
Researchers create synthetic ion transporter that triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

Researchers create synthetic ion transporter that triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

Researchers from the University of Southampton are part of an international team that has helped to create a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by carrying sodium and chloride ions into the cells. [More]
Researchers create synthetic molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct

Researchers create synthetic molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. [More]
Research report on global market for respiratory devices

Research report on global market for respiratory devices

The worldwide respiratory device market continues to grow despite economic downturns mainly due to the aging of the world population and increasing incidence of COPD. [More]
Experts explain pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes

Experts explain pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes

Enzyme supplements available without a prescription are becoming increasingly popular, but should everyone add them to their shopping list? Brent Bauer, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, is co-author of a new paper in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on the pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes. [More]
FDA grants orphan-drug designation to Genoa's pirfenidone for treatment of IPF disease

FDA grants orphan-drug designation to Genoa's pirfenidone for treatment of IPF disease

Genoa Pharmaceuticals, the leader in inhaled medicines for pulmonary fibrosis, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted orphan-drug designation to Genoa for the use of pirfenidone in their lead program - inhaled GP-101 for the treatment of IPF. [More]
Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

UC San Francisco is the lead institution on a new seven-year, $17 million multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health to determine if certain immune system cells and/or a drug now used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can be effective in improving and maintaining the long-term health of kidney transplant recipients. [More]
Four major health institutions jointly receive $7 million for health data research network

Four major health institutions jointly receive $7 million for health data research network

Four major health institutions, including Penn State College of Medicine, have jointly received nearly $7 million to develop and expand a health data research network. [More]
Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

In the case of a cough or a sore throat, the doctor can usually diagnose a common cold immediately. However, the diagnosis of hereditary illnesses like cystic fibrosis, which affects the metabolism, or Huntington's disease, which leads to cognitive decline, is much more complex. [More]
Combined risk score enhances radiation pneumonitis prediction

Combined risk score enhances radiation pneumonitis prediction

Combining dose-volume histogram parameters with age and baseline pulmonary fibrosis score creates a novel predictive risk score that improves prediction of radiation pneumonitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer, research shows. [More]
Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Researchers have identified a potential biomarker for airway obstruction in patients with asthma that not only reflects airflow limitation but also asthma control. [More]
Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy

Too much dietary fat is bad for the heart, but the right kind of fat keeps the heart healthy, according to a paper published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

The only drug to receive FDA approval for reduction of the abdominal fat deposits that develop in some patients receiving antiviral therapy for HIV infection may also reduce the incidence of fatty liver disease in such patients. [More]