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Gastroenterology is the branch of medicine where the digestive system and its disorders are studied.
Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through both lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery can significantly reduce features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver, according to two new studies published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
NEJM suggests use of HCV-positive kidneys as one solution to kidney shortage

NEJM suggests use of HCV-positive kidneys as one solution to kidney shortage

The average wait time for a kidney transplant is five years and there are more than 100,000 people on the waiting list. However, there are thousands of viable hepatitis C-positive kidneys that are discarded each year solely because they're infected. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

UCLA scientists have discovered a groundbreaking experimental therapy that has the ability to suppress the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), a disease which causes inflammation in the digestive tract and colon cancer. The treatment utilizes a chemical inhibitor able to block an RNA molecule (microRNA-214) involved in the transmission of genetic information. [More]
New review article analyzes pros and cons of different treatment approaches to gallbladder disease

New review article analyzes pros and cons of different treatment approaches to gallbladder disease

More than 25 million Americans have gallstones, and each year about 1 million new cases are diagnosed. Each year about 1.8 million people develop abdominal pain as a result of gallstones and go see a doctor about it. About 40 percent of these, more than 725,000 people a year, ultimately have surgery to resolve the problem. [More]
Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Newborn children born with a mutation in the Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein (PLVAP) gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy, according to a case study1 published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network and Penn State Health have signed a letter of intent to enter into formal affiliation. With approval by organizational boards and state authorities, Tyrone Regional will become a member of Penn State Health. [More]
UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica have been named to U.S. News and World Report's 2015-2016 Best Hospitals Honor Roll. UCLA, which previously ranked No. 5 in the country, tied for No. 3 this year. [More]
UC San Diego Health ranked again among nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

UC San Diego Health ranked again among nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

Once again, UC San Diego Health and its hospitals are ranked #1 in San Diego, and recognized among the best in the nation, by U.S. News & World Report for 2015-16. The annual U.S. News "Best Hospitals" rankings distinguish hospitals that excel in treating the most challenging health conditions. [More]
MD Anderson researchers find high prevalence of hereditary CRC among people diagnosed before the age of 35

MD Anderson researchers find high prevalence of hereditary CRC among people diagnosed before the age of 35

Hereditary colorectal cancers, caused by inherited gene mutations, are relatively rare for most patients. However, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered a particularly high prevalence of hereditary cancers among those diagnosed with the disease before the age of 35. They suggest that these patients should undergo genetic counseling to determine if their families may be at an elevated risk. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers test Spheroid Reservoir Bioartificial Liver to treat patients with acute liver failure

Mayo Clinic researchers test Spheroid Reservoir Bioartificial Liver to treat patients with acute liver failure

Approximately 30,000-40,000 people die from liver disease each year, according to the American Liver Foundation. For people who experience acute liver failure, the only proven treatment has been liver transplantation. Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed and are testing an alternative to liver transplantation called the Spheroid Reservoir Bioartificial Liver that can support healing and regeneration of the injured liver, and improve outcomes and reduce mortality rates for patients with acute liver failure — without requiring a transplant. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
NuSI launches groundbreaking clinical study to halt nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

NuSI launches groundbreaking clinical study to halt nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

Nutrition Science Initiative has launched the first-ever randomized, controlled clinical trial to determine whether removing added sugars from the diet can halt or even reverse nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children. [More]
Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Patients whose colorectal cancer (CRC) is detected during a screening colonoscopy are likely to survive longer than those who wait until they have symptoms before having the test, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]
Biosimilars show promise for children with IBD, but more research needed

Biosimilars show promise for children with IBD, but more research needed

Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who are doing well on specific biological medications should not be switched to recently approved "biosimilar" products, concludes an expert consensus statement of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Restrictive policies for blood transfusions could produce significant cost savings for NHS

Restrictive policies for blood transfusions could produce significant cost savings for NHS

Changing clinical thresholds for the single leading reason for blood transfusions could safely produce significant savings for the NHS, according to NHS Blood and Transplant research published in The Lancet tomorrow. [More]
Tillotts Pharma to purchase global rights for AstraZeneca’s Entocort excluding the U.S.

Tillotts Pharma to purchase global rights for AstraZeneca’s Entocort excluding the U.S.

Tillotts Pharma AG, part of the Zeria Group, announced today that it has entered into an agreement for the acquisition of the global rights for Entocort (budesonide) from AstraZeneca, excluding the U.S., which will remain with AstraZeneca. [More]
New McLane Children's video visit program allows patients to connect with doctor from their home

New McLane Children's video visit program allows patients to connect with doctor from their home

McLane Children's, part of Baylor Scott & White Health, is piloting a new video visit program that allows patients who live far from the hospital to see their physician from the comfort of their own home. The program has successfully completed video visits with patients as far away as West Texas and the Rio Grande Valley. [More]
Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Cancer cells defy the rules by which normal cells abide. They can divide without cease, invade distant tissues and consume glucose at abnormal rates. [More]
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