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Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals susceptible to opportunistic infections and tumors. HIV is transmitted through direct contact of a mucous membrane or the bloodstream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk.
SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance was recently recognized for outperforming its anticipated one-year survival rate for allogeneic transplant patients. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

The biological mesoscale range includes biological structures that range from 10 to 100 nanometers (billionths of a meter). Structures in this size range include viruses, cellular organelles, large molecular complexes, and any other internal cellular environments within that range. [More]
HIV/AIDS survival rates lower in the southern U.S.

HIV/AIDS survival rates lower in the southern U.S.

The southern U.S. had the nation's lowest five-year survival rate among those diagnosed with HIV or AIDS in 2003-2004, according to new research. [More]
Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

NRTIs are compounds which were originally developed in the 1960s as anti-cancer agents. They are similar in structure to the bases which make up DNA, and it was hoped that they would interfere with DNA replication in fast-growing cancer cells, slowing down or stopping tumour growth. [More]
Higher parental education can increase depression risk in black youth

Higher parental education can increase depression risk in black youth

An investigation into factors related to disparities of depression in young adults has found that higher parental education - which has a protective effect for white youth - can also increase the risk of depression for black youth. [More]
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Self-reported moderate to vigorous exercise was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels in a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

The genetic abnormality that drives the bone cancer Ewing sarcoma operates through two distinct processes - both activating genes that stimulate tumor growth and suppressing those that should keep cancer from developing. These findings by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, published in the November issue of Cancer Cell, may lead to new therapies targeting these aberrant mechanisms. [More]
Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers from Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City have identified a new "sliding scale" model used to rule out potentially deadly blood clots in the lungs, known as pulmonary embolisms, that is more accurate than current diagnostic methods. [More]
EGPAF to receive $63 million UNITAID grant to improve early infant diagnosis of HIV programs

EGPAF to receive $63 million UNITAID grant to improve early infant diagnosis of HIV programs

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is pleased to announce that it has been selected by the UNITAID Executive Board to receive up to $63 million in funding to improve early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV programs in nine African countries. This investment will pave the way for universal access to HIV testing and enable a ten-fold increase in HIV treatment, thus transforming the effort to end AIDS in children worldwide. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]
Scientists validate oral vaccine delivery system to combat global health threats

Scientists validate oral vaccine delivery system to combat global health threats

Scientists at The Forsyth Institute and Tufts University have succeeded in describing and validating a unique system of oral vaccine delivery using a common bacteria found in the mouth. [More]

New study helps identify public health needs relating to HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C in Massachusetts

A new study from epidemiologists at Tufts University School of Medicine helps to identify communities with the greatest public health need in Massachusetts for resources relating to HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate Orally Disintegrating Tablets

Mylan announces U.S. launch of Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate Orally Disintegrating Tablets

Mylan Inc. today announced the U.S. launch of its Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate Orally Disintegrating Tablets, 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg. This product is the first generic version of Shionogi's Orapred ODT. [More]
Mylan introduces Methocarbamol Injection USP, 100 mg/mL in the U.S.

Mylan introduces Methocarbamol Injection USP, 100 mg/mL in the U.S.

Mylan Inc. today announced the U.S. launch of its Methocarbamol Injection USP, 100 mg/mL, packaged in 1,000 mg/10 mL single-dose vials. This product is the generic version of Hikma Maple Ltd.'s Robaxin. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of Celecoxib Capsules

Mylan announces U.S. launch of Celecoxib Capsules

Mylan Inc. today announced the U.S. launch of its Celecoxib Capsules, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, and 400 mg, one of the first available generic versions of Pfizer's Celebrex Capsules, which is indicated for the relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and for the management of acute pain in adults. [More]
Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer HealthCare and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) have signed an agreement under which Bayer will provide the active ingredient emodepside to support DNDi in its effort to develop a new oral drug to treat river blindness (or onchocerciasis). The world's second leading infectious cause of blindness, river blindness is a neglected tropical disease caused by a filarial worm. [More]
Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test receives CLIA Waiver from FDA

Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test receives CLIA Waiver from FDA

Alere Inc., a global leader in rapid diagnostic tests, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments) Waiver for the Alere Determineā„¢ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test. [More]
New study investigates rate of HIV testing in patients with mental illnesses

New study investigates rate of HIV testing in patients with mental illnesses

People with mental illness are more likely to have been tested for HIV than those without mental illness, according to a new study from a team of researchers at Penn Medicine and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published online this week in AIDS Patient Care and STDs. [More]