Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
U of M, RIT awarded $3 million grant to assess health information between deaf and hearing individuals

U of M, RIT awarded $3 million grant to assess health information between deaf and hearing individuals

Health information can be difficult to understand for anyone, but it is especially difficult for deaf individuals who may struggle with information and health care marginalization. This is a population with high rates of inadequate health literacy and health disparities. A grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders is looking to change that. [More]
Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families with children who have special health care needs are at high risk for food insecurity, even when they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and participate in public assistance programs, such as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [More]
Cancer patients who miss scheduled radiation therapy appointments have worse outcomes

Cancer patients who miss scheduled radiation therapy appointments have worse outcomes

Cancer patients who miss two or more radiation therapy sessions have a worse outcome than fully compliant patients, investigators at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and Albert Einstein College of Medicine's NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center have found. [More]
New AGS guidance aims to transform approaches to healthcare for older patients

New AGS guidance aims to transform approaches to healthcare for older patients

New guidance from the American Geriatrics Society aims to transform approaches to healthcare for our increasingly diverse older population. Developed by a committee of experts in ethnogeriatrics (the study of how ethnicity and culture impact the health and well-being of older people), "Achieving High-Quality Multicultural Geriatric Care" outlines present health disparities and the need for sensitivity to culture and health literacy when working with older individuals. [More]
Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that when human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is detected in peoples' mouths, they are 22 times more likely than those without HPV-16 to develop a type of head and neck cancer. [More]
Researchers engineer antibodies that could potently neutralize two deadliest strains of Ebola virus

Researchers engineer antibodies that could potently neutralize two deadliest strains of Ebola virus

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases have engineered the first antibodies that can potently neutralize the two deadliest strains of the virus that causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever. [More]
Transgender veterans have significantly greater prevalence of many psychiatric and medical conditions

Transgender veterans have significantly greater prevalence of many psychiatric and medical conditions

The first large, controlled study of health disparities between clinically diagnosed transgender and non-transgender patients-based on the medical records of more than 5,000 patients treated in the Veterans Health Administration-showed that transgender veterans had a significantly greater prevalence of numerous psychiatric and medical conditions. [More]
UAB study to examine social support, intuitive eating impact on older African-American men with diabetes

UAB study to examine social support, intuitive eating impact on older African-American men with diabetes

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Assistant Professor Loretta T. Lee, Ph.D., has received a 2015 Deep South Resource Center for Minority Aging pilot grant award to examine the association of social support and intuitive eating with glycemic control in older African-American men with diagnosed type 2 diabetes. [More]
Ebola virus and bats waging molecular battle for survival

Ebola virus and bats waging molecular battle for survival

Ebola virus and bats have been waging a molecular battle for survival that may have started at least 25 million years ago, according to a study led by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU-Boulder) and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) that published online today in the journal eLife. [More]
UTHealth receives nearly $5.7 million from CPRIT for cancer research

UTHealth receives nearly $5.7 million from CPRIT for cancer research

The Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas has awarded nearly $5.7 million in grants to The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. The grants will fund projects that train innovative cancer researchers, increase breast and cervical cancer screening among Hispanics and raise awareness about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. [More]
One of every three deaths in the U.S. linked to cardiovascular diseases

One of every three deaths in the U.S. linked to cardiovascular diseases

One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association's 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. [More]
Perceived stress increases likelihood of amnestic mild cognitive impairment in older people

Perceived stress increases likelihood of amnestic mild cognitive impairment in older people

Feeling stressed out increases the likelihood that elderly people will develop mild cognitive impairment—often a prelude to full-blown Alzheimer's disease. In a new study, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System found that highly stressed participants were more than twice as likely to become impaired than those who were not. [More]
Review provides recommendations to improve cancer screening, treatment in people with mental illness

Review provides recommendations to improve cancer screening, treatment in people with mental illness

A new report calls attention to cancer in people with mental illness, suggesting that healthcare system and societal factors are just as critical as individual lifestyle factors-- linked to smoking and obesity--that lead to health disparities among this group. [More]
FIRS calls for continued international support to end AIDS epidemic by 2030

FIRS calls for continued international support to end AIDS epidemic by 2030

World AIDS Day, held annually on the first day of December each year since 1988, is an opportunity for people around the world to join in the fight, show their support for those living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and commemorate the lives of those who have died. [More]
Survivors of gunshot violence in high-crime urban area at risk of early death

Survivors of gunshot violence in high-crime urban area at risk of early death

One in 20 survivors of gunshot violence in an urban area with high crime died within five years, mainly by homicide, according to the results of a study that tracked patients after they had been discharged from the hospital that treated them. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers awarded $14 million PCORI grant for hepatitis C research

Montefiore and Einstein researchers awarded $14 million PCORI grant for hepatitis C research

A research team at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine led by Alain Litwin, M.D., was awarded $14 million by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to determine how best to treat hepatitis C among people who inject drugs (PWID), a group with a high rate of infection. [More]
Researchers team up to evaluate biological and genetic differences of GI cancers in race, ethnicity

Researchers team up to evaluate biological and genetic differences of GI cancers in race, ethnicity

Americans of African descent are at a significantly higher risk for developing and dying from Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, which include colorectal and pancreatic cancers, compared to individuals who are of Caucasian descent. [More]
Federal food policy changes boost healthful food options at smaller urban corner stores

Federal food policy changes boost healthful food options at smaller urban corner stores

Federal food policy changes led to increased availability of healthy foods at smaller urban corner stores in Baltimore, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. Increases in healthy food were greatest in corner stores and in neighborhoods with a majority of black residents. [More]

Digital health startup boot camp expands to US

Startupbootcamp, a global family of industry - focused accelerators, has today announced the launch of its first accelerator programs in North America, Startupbootcamp Digital Health. [More]
Stanford bioethicist wins 2015 MacLean Center Prize in Clinical Ethics and Health Outcomes

Stanford bioethicist wins 2015 MacLean Center Prize in Clinical Ethics and Health Outcomes

The 2015 MacLean Center Prize in Clinical Ethics and Health Outcomes, a $50,000 award, will be presented to Laura Roberts, MD, MA, a graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, who is chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine and an internationally recognized scholar in bioethics, psychiatry, medicine and medical education. [More]
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