Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
Viewpoints: Hobby Lobby decision celebrated and panned; gender and religious politics explored

Viewpoints: Hobby Lobby decision celebrated and panned; gender and religious politics explored

In ruling 5 to 4 that "closely held" companies can refuse on religious grounds to include contraceptives in their employees' health plans, the Supreme Court has needlessly interfered with an important provision of the Affordable Care Act. And it has done more than that (7/1). [More]
Dental hygienists prepare to take increased responsibilities for oral health care

Dental hygienists prepare to take increased responsibilities for oral health care

With opportunities to take increased responsibility for oral health care and to deliver care in a more comprehensive way, it's an exciting time in the profession of dental hygiene. [More]
Death rates remain higher for African-Americans with colon cancer

Death rates remain higher for African-Americans with colon cancer

African-Americans with colon cancer are half as likely as Caucasian patients to have a type of colon cancer that is linked to better outcomes. The finding may provide insight into why African-Americans are more likely to die of colon cancer than Caucasians with the same stage of disease. [More]
NIH receives $10 million grant for research on breast cancer metastasis

NIH receives $10 million grant for research on breast cancer metastasis

The American Cancer Society predicts that 40,000 American women will die from breast cancer this year. Most of those deaths will occur due to cells from the primary tumor that spread to other parts of the body-the process known as metastasis. [More]
NICHD urged to enhance scientific expertise of National Children's Study program

NICHD urged to enhance scientific expertise of National Children's Study program

A study that would track the health of 100,000 babies to age 21 has been put on hold following the release of an assessment report issued June 16 by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM). [More]
New article explores ethical issues and global health impact of counterterrorism

New article explores ethical issues and global health impact of counterterrorism

The surge in murders of polio vaccination workers in Pakistan has made headlines this year, but little attention has been devoted to the ethical issues surrounding the global health impact of current counterterrorism policy and practice. An essay in the Hastings Center Report reviews the range of harms to population health traceable to counterterrorism operations. [More]
Educational sleep program increases sleep duration in preschoolers

Educational sleep program increases sleep duration in preschoolers

Taking part in an educational sleep program resulted in a 30-minute average increase in sleep duration at a one-month follow-up for preschoolers, according to a new study from the University of Michigan. [More]
Promising way to prevent disparities in colorectal cancer screening

Promising way to prevent disparities in colorectal cancer screening

People living in poverty are less likely to be screened regularly for colorectal cancer-and more likely to develop the disease and die from it. How to end these disparities-and raise screening rates, lower disease rates, and prevent deaths? A promising way is to mail fecal immunochemical tests (a newer kind of stool test) to populations, Beverly B. Green, MD, MPH, and Gloria D. Coronado, PhD, wrote in the June 17 JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
African-American women at increased risk for deadlier breast cancers, study finds

African-American women at increased risk for deadlier breast cancers, study finds

A research study led by cancer specialists at MedStar Washington Hospital Center found that African-American women frequently present with biologically less favorable subtypes of breast cancer. [More]
University of Indianapolis breaks ground June 19 on $28 million Health Pavilion

University of Indianapolis breaks ground June 19 on $28 million Health Pavilion

The University of Indianapolis will break ground June 19 on a four-story, $28 million Health Pavilion that will house UIndy's healthcare- and wellness-related academic programs as well as industry partners and clinical facilities to serve the community. [More]
Study examines relationships among life-changing events and decreased physical activity

Study examines relationships among life-changing events and decreased physical activity

Adults tend to engage in less leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) after changes in both lifestyle and physical status, finds a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Kelley Thompson selected to receive 2014 PCFSN Community Leadership Award

Kelley Thompson selected to receive 2014 PCFSN Community Leadership Award

The President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN) has selected Kelley Thompson to receive a 2014 PCFSN Community Leadership Award. The award is given to individuals and organizations who significantly improve the lives of others through sports, fitness or nutrition-related programs within local neighborhoods. [More]
State highlights: NYC mental health task force; Minn. seeks marijuana boss; N.C. disparities for gay community

State highlights: NYC mental health task force; Minn. seeks marijuana boss; N.C. disparities for gay community

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a new task force Monday to overhaul how New York City's corrections system treats the mentally ill -- both in jail and out -- following the grisly deaths of two inmates with psychological problems (6/2). [More]
New program appears to be effective in reducing risk of lymphedema in breast cancer survivors

New program appears to be effective in reducing risk of lymphedema in breast cancer survivors

Viewed as one of the most unfortunate outcomes of breast cancer treatment, lymphedema is characterized by an accumulation of lymph fluid in the interstitial spaces of the affected limb, leading to chronic ipsilateral limb swelling causing psychosocial distress and physical challenges for patients. [More]
Study finds older black trauma patients more likely to survive injuries than whites

Study finds older black trauma patients more likely to survive injuries than whites

In a finding that runs counter to most health disparities research, Johns Hopkins researchers say that while younger black trauma patients are significantly more likely than whites to die from their injuries, black trauma patients over the age of 65 are 20 percent less likely to do so. [More]
Researchers discover signaling pathway in cancer cells that invades nearby tissues

Researchers discover signaling pathway in cancer cells that invades nearby tissues

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered a signaling pathway in cancer cells that controls their ability to invade nearby tissues in a finely orchestrated manner. [More]
Physical activity may be able to prevent overweight women from developing heart disease

Physical activity may be able to prevent overweight women from developing heart disease

For otherwise healthy middle-aged women who are overweight or obese, physical activity may be their best option for avoiding heart disease, according to a study that followed nearly 900 women for seven years. [More]
Recruiting more Hispanics to cancer clinical trials crucial to reducing health disparities

Recruiting more Hispanics to cancer clinical trials crucial to reducing health disparities

Hispanics are the fastest-growing demographic group in the United States, and they suffer from major health disparities, including higher rates of cancers of the cervix, stomach and liver. [More]
University of New Mexico scientist wins prestigious C-Change Comprehensive Cancer Control Champion Award

University of New Mexico scientist wins prestigious C-Change Comprehensive Cancer Control Champion Award

University of New Mexico Cancer Center scientist Barbara Damron, RN, PhD, FAAN, recently won the prestigious C-Change Comprehensive Cancer Control Champion Award. [More]
Albert Einstein College of Medicine hosts second Stem Cell Symposium focusing on cancer stem cells

Albert Einstein College of Medicine hosts second Stem Cell Symposium focusing on cancer stem cells

Healthy stem cells work to restore or repair the body's tissues, but cancer stem cells have a more nefarious mission: to spawn malignant tumors. Cancer stem cells were discovered a decade ago, but their origins and identity remain largely unknown. [More]