Hematology News and Research RSS Feed - Hematology News and Research

Hematology, also spelled haematology, is the branch of biology (physiology), pathology, clinical laboratory, internal medicine, and pediatrics that is concerned with the study of blood, the blood-forming organs, and blood diseases. Hematology includes the study of etiology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of blood diseases.
Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene, one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one researchers have so far had difficulty targeting successfully. [More]
Researchers find promising new therapy for both pediatric and adult cancers

Researchers find promising new therapy for both pediatric and adult cancers

A study conducted at Nationwide Children's Hospital has found that a new chemotherapy is effective against both pediatric and adult cancers, and that it allows other chemotherapies to more readily reach their targets. [More]
Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Great question – the answer is actually unknown. Every month, there are publications that report on new cancer-related genes, so it's an area of great knowledge growth at the moment. [More]
Hematology researchers develop new bio-engineered clotting factor to control bleeding

Hematology researchers develop new bio-engineered clotting factor to control bleeding

Every five minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a blood clot, through its role in strokes, heart attacks or other severe conditions. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Health economics studies, published today in The Lancet Haematology, report that the cost of treating blood cancers is twice that for treating other cancers. This is largely because they require more complex treatment regimens that necessitate longer hospital stays. [More]
ASH commits $3 million annual funding to help sustain promising blood disease research

ASH commits $3 million annual funding to help sustain promising blood disease research

With a $3 million annual commitment to support promising blood disease research amid limited National Institutes of Health funding, the American Society of Hematology--the world's largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatment of blood disorders--today announced the formal establishment of the ASH Bridge Grant program after an extended four-year pilot study. [More]
New study offers hypothesis why obese patients fare worse during cancer treatment

New study offers hypothesis why obese patients fare worse during cancer treatment

Across many cancer types, obese patients fare worse than leaner patients. Now a University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell offers a compelling hypothesis why: researchers found that leukemia stem cells "hide" in fatty tissue, even transforming this tissue in ways that support their survival when challenged with chemotherapy. It is as if leukemia stem cells not only use fatty tissue as a robbers' cave to hide from therapy, but actively adapt this cave to their liking. [More]
Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

A new scientific study has identified why colorectal cancer cells depend on a specific nutrient, and a way to starve them of it. Over one million men and women are living with colorectal cancer in the United States. [More]
Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding a novel monoclonal antibody therapy to traditional chemotherapy increased median survival by nearly a year in patients with advanced sarcoma, a lethal soft-tissue cancer. [More]
Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

A multidisciplinary team of scientists -- including two UC Santa Barbara faculty members -- is poised to undertake a major biomedical research initiative focused on the escalating problem of sepsis, the body's abnormal response to severe infections. [More]
Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Study reports BV therapy may be curative in some Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Five-year survival data published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, suggest that the targeted therapy brentuximab vedotin may have cured some Hodgkin lymphoma patients whose disease has persisted despite receiving previous therapies. [More]
New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

TUM scientists discover molecular signaling pathway for self-destruction in leukemia cells

When adults develop blood cancer, they are frequently diagnosed with what is referred to as acute myeloid leukemia. [More]
Scientists discover novel genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of femoral head

Scientists discover novel genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of femoral head

Scientists at the Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre have discovered a new genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of the hip, specifically the femoral head - the spherical-shaped mass at the top of the femur. [More]
Study finds low rates of baseline BMD testing among older women with breast cancer

Study finds low rates of baseline BMD testing among older women with breast cancer

Aromatase inhibitors (AIs)—drugs that stop the production of estrogen in women—are standard adjuvant therapy for post-menopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. [More]
UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

More than 20 percent of all blood clots in veins occur in cancer patients. These clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), pose serious threats for cancer patients. [More]
UCLA scientists identify mechanisms of tumor resistance to immunotherapy in advanced melanoma

UCLA scientists identify mechanisms of tumor resistance to immunotherapy in advanced melanoma

UCLA researchers have for the first time identified mechanisms that determine how advanced melanoma can become resistant to immune checkpoint inhibitors, a discovery that could lead to the development of new and improved treatments for the deadliest type of skin cancer. [More]
Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire plc announces that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Xiidra (lifitegrast ophthalmic solution) 5%, a twice-daily eye drop solution indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adult patients. [More]
I-SPY2 research initiative employs exciting new model for testing breast cancer drugs

I-SPY2 research initiative employs exciting new model for testing breast cancer drugs

In a new paradigm of breast cancer research, physicians are fast-tracking promising new experimental drugs for further study, while immediately dropping drugs and drug combinations that don't work. [More]
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