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Hematology, also spelled haematology, is the branch of biology (physiology), pathology, clinical laboratory, internal medicine, and pediatrics that is concerned with the study of blood, the blood-forming organs, and blood diseases. Hematology includes the study of etiology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of blood diseases.
Outpatient CLABSIs costly for pediatric stem cell transplant and oncology patient population

Outpatient CLABSIs costly for pediatric stem cell transplant and oncology patient population

Pediatric stem cell transplant and cancer patients often are discharged from the hospital with an external central venous line for medications that parents or other caregivers must clean and flush daily to avoid potentially life-threatening infections. [More]
Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV has announced the submission of a Type II variation application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), seeking to broaden the existing marketing authorisation for the immunotherapy DARZALEX® (daratumumab) to include treatment of adult patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The expanded indication is based on daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide (an immmunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone, or bortezomib (a PI) and dexamethasone. [More]
Scientists find new way to use CRISPR gene editing to help fix sickle cell disease

Scientists find new way to use CRISPR gene editing to help fix sickle cell disease

An international team of scientists led by researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has found a way to use CRISPR gene editing to help fix sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia in blood cells isolated from patients. [More]
Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death. [More]
Siemens Healthineers launches fully-automated coagulation analyzer with PSI technology in the U.S.

Siemens Healthineers launches fully-automated coagulation analyzer with PSI technology in the U.S.

Today, Siemens Healthineers Laboratory Diagnostics business launched the Sysmex CS-2500 System—a mid-volume, fully-automated coagulation analyzer with smartly-designed PSI technology—in major markets including the U.S. Together with Lab Alliance of Central New York, the first U.S. customer to install the high-volume Sysmex CS-5100 System, the company celebrated the availability of its new Sysmex CS Hemostasis System portfolio in the U.S. [More]
Research could help develop better therapies for new subtype of adenocarcinoma  patients

Research could help develop better therapies for new subtype of adenocarcinoma patients

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths, accounting for about a third of all tumor-related deaths. Adenocarcinomas, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), account for about 40 percent of cancer diagnoses, but few treatments are available for the disease. [More]
AACC 2016: DRG International to exhibit Optimized Saliva ELISA Assays for measuring steroids

AACC 2016: DRG International to exhibit Optimized Saliva ELISA Assays for measuring steroids

DRG International, a leading international medical diagnostic company, will showcase the Newly Optimized DRG Saliva ELISA Assays at the 2016 AACC in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from August 02-04. [More]
Malfunctioning of molecular signaling system suppresses mature blood cells battling against sepsis

Malfunctioning of molecular signaling system suppresses mature blood cells battling against sepsis

When the body encounters an infection, a molecular signaling system ramps up the body's infection-fighting system to produce more white blood cells to attack invading bacteria. [More]
DRG International to display Hepcidin 25 (bioactive) HS ELISA Kit at 2016 AACC Expo

DRG International to display Hepcidin 25 (bioactive) HS ELISA Kit at 2016 AACC Expo

DRG International, a leading international medical diagnostic company, will showcase the NEW DRG Hepcidin 25 (bioactive) HS (High Sensitive) ELISA Kit (EIA-5782) at the 2016 AACC in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from August 02-04. [More]
DRG International to present Aldosterone ELISA Kit at 2016 AACC

DRG International to present Aldosterone ELISA Kit at 2016 AACC

DRG International, a leading international medical diagnostic company, will showcase its DRG Aldosterone ELISA Kit at the 2016 AACC in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on August 02-04. [More]
Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene, one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one researchers have so far had difficulty targeting successfully. [More]
Researchers find promising new therapy for both pediatric and adult cancers

Researchers find promising new therapy for both pediatric and adult cancers

A study conducted at Nationwide Children's Hospital has found that a new chemotherapy is effective against both pediatric and adult cancers, and that it allows other chemotherapies to more readily reach their targets. [More]
Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Great question – the answer is actually unknown. Every month, there are publications that report on new cancer-related genes, so it's an area of great knowledge growth at the moment. [More]
Hematology researchers develop new bio-engineered clotting factor to control bleeding

Hematology researchers develop new bio-engineered clotting factor to control bleeding

Every five minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a blood clot, through its role in strokes, heart attacks or other severe conditions. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Health economics studies, published today in The Lancet Haematology, report that the cost of treating blood cancers is twice that for treating other cancers. This is largely because they require more complex treatment regimens that necessitate longer hospital stays. [More]
ASH commits $3 million annual funding to help sustain promising blood disease research

ASH commits $3 million annual funding to help sustain promising blood disease research

With a $3 million annual commitment to support promising blood disease research amid limited National Institutes of Health funding, the American Society of Hematology--the world's largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatment of blood disorders--today announced the formal establishment of the ASH Bridge Grant program after an extended four-year pilot study. [More]
New study offers hypothesis why obese patients fare worse during cancer treatment

New study offers hypothesis why obese patients fare worse during cancer treatment

Across many cancer types, obese patients fare worse than leaner patients. Now a University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell offers a compelling hypothesis why: researchers found that leukemia stem cells "hide" in fatty tissue, even transforming this tissue in ways that support their survival when challenged with chemotherapy. It is as if leukemia stem cells not only use fatty tissue as a robbers' cave to hide from therapy, but actively adapt this cave to their liking. [More]
Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

Researchers identify unique mechanism to suppress colorectal cancer tumors in mice

A new scientific study has identified why colorectal cancer cells depend on a specific nutrient, and a way to starve them of it. Over one million men and women are living with colorectal cancer in the United States. [More]
Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding a novel monoclonal antibody therapy to traditional chemotherapy increased median survival by nearly a year in patients with advanced sarcoma, a lethal soft-tissue cancer. [More]
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