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The hippocampus is a part of the forebrain, located in the medial temporal lobe. It belongs to the limbic system and plays major roles in short term memory and spatial navigation. Humans and other mammals have two hippocampi, one in each side of the brain.
Moderate exercise may help treat memory impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes

Moderate exercise may help treat memory impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes

University of Tsukuba-led researchers show that moderate exercise may improve hippocampal memory dysfunction caused by type 2 diabetes and that enhanced transport of lactate to neurons may be the underlying mechanism [More]
Rhythm of breathing influences emotional judgments and memory recall

Rhythm of breathing influences emotional judgments and memory recall

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered for the first time that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall. [More]
BUSM researchers discover role of hippocampus in future thinking

BUSM researchers discover role of hippocampus in future thinking

Over the past decade, researchers have learned that the hippocampus--historically known for its role in forming memories--is involved in much more than just remembering the past; it plays an important role in imagining events in the future. [More]
Researcher explores link between PTSD and repeated alcohol use

Researcher explores link between PTSD and repeated alcohol use

As families gather for the holidays this year, many will reminisce, sharing fond memories as they break bread and pass the cranberry sauce. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of brain injury in young NFL players

Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of brain injury in young NFL players

In a small study of young or recently retired NFL players, researchers at Johns Hopkins report finding evidence of brain injury and repair that is visible on imaging from the players compared to a control group of men without a history of concussion. [More]
Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Despite the fact that more than four percent of the world's population suffer from depression, and even though approximately 1,500 individuals commit suicide each year in Sweden, the understanding of the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear and only a few new discoveries of mechanisms behind it have been made in recent years. [More]
Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Cubresa’s SPECT scanner was used to determine if a novel molecular label, TRV6001, in development for in vivo imaging of the BChE enzyme present in the brains of Alzheimer’s Disease patients follows the known distribution of the enzyme in animal models of the disease. [More]
Study finds abnormally low blood flow in the brain of marijuana users

Study finds abnormally low blood flow in the brain of marijuana users

As the U.S. races to legalize marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, a new, large scale brain imaging study gives reason for caution. [More]
New study finds link between memory mechanisms and resistance to epilepsy

New study finds link between memory mechanisms and resistance to epilepsy

A new study undertaken jointly by researchers from the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and European researchers, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, exposes a new biological mechanism that, on the one hand, damages a very specific type of memory, but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy. [More]
Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Every night while you sleep, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain, tracing a pattern that, were it on the surface of your head, might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia. [More]
Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A non-invasive protocol testing the ability to recognize, remember and distinguish between odors was able to identify older individuals who - according to genetic, imaging and more detailed memory tests - were at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Cannabinoid receptors regulate memory processes by modulating mitochondrial energy metabolism

Cannabinoid receptors regulate memory processes by modulating mitochondrial energy metabolism

It has been known for some time that the extracts of the Cannabis plant, just like synthetic cannabinoids and those produced by the brain itself, join up with type 1 (CB1) cannabinoid receptors located in the nerve endings of the neurons, and inhibit the release of chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) in the communication areas between the nerve cells. [More]
Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

By the time epilepsy patient Erika Fleck came to Loyola Medicine for a second opinion, she was having three or four seizures a week and hadn't been able to drive her two young children for five years. [More]
Scientists investigate role of mitochondria in Alzheimer's disease pathology

Scientists investigate role of mitochondria in Alzheimer's disease pathology

On Nov. 25, 1901, a 51-year-old woman is admitted to a hospital in Frankfurt, Germany, displaying a bizarre constellation of symptoms. [More]
Lack of shrinkage in the hippocampus may help predict people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

Lack of shrinkage in the hippocampus may help predict people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies is a progressive disease that causes hallucinations, decline in mental abilities, rigid muscles, slow movement and tremors. With symptoms similar to Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, a correct diagnosis can be difficult. [More]
Lack of brain shrinkage may help identify people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

Lack of brain shrinkage may help identify people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

A lack of shrinkage in the area of the brain responsible for memory may be a sign that people with thinking and memory problems may go on to develop dementia with Lewy bodies rather than Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in the November 2, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Research findings offer detailed insight into mechanics of learning

Research findings offer detailed insight into mechanics of learning

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin can now map what happens neurologically when new information influences a person to change his or her mind, a finding that offers more insight into the mechanics of learning. [More]
Researchers explore interaction between two brain regions during formation of long-term memories

Researchers explore interaction between two brain regions during formation of long-term memories

Our brain has a tough task every time we experience something new - it must be flexible to take in new information instantly, but also stable enough to store it for a long time. [More]
Ionizing radiation may be confounding factor in Alzheimer's disease, study suggests

Ionizing radiation may be confounding factor in Alzheimer's disease, study suggests

More humans than ever are exposed to higher levels of ionizing radiation from medical equipment, airplanes, etc. A new study suggests that this kind of radiation may be a confounding factor in the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer´s. [More]
Vanderbilt scientists develop new bioluminescent sensor that can light up brain cells in the dark

Vanderbilt scientists develop new bioluminescent sensor that can light up brain cells in the dark

A new kind of bioluminescent sensor causes individual brain cells to imitate fireflies and glow in the dark. [More]
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