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The hippocampus is a part of the forebrain, located in the medial temporal lobe. It belongs to the limbic system and plays major roles in short term memory and spatial navigation. Humans and other mammals have two hippocampi, one in each side of the brain.

Same brain cells involved in encoding and retrieving memories

Are the same regions and even the same cells of the brain area called hippocampus involved in encoding and retrieving memories or are different areas of this structure engaged? This question has kept neuroscientists busy for a long time. Researchers at the Mercator Research Group "Structure of Memory" at RUB have now found out that the same brain cells exhibit activity in both processes. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

Static synapses that lie between cell body and AIS critical for decreasing neuronal excitability

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. [More]
Researchers examine brain networks involved in PTSD and TBI

Researchers examine brain networks involved in PTSD and TBI

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have devastating consequences. Both are associated with high rates of disability and suicide, and although they are separate conditions, they commonly co-occur. For example, a soldier who has developed PTSD as a result of a traumatic experience may have also sustained a brain injury during that experience. [More]
Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Growing up in West Virginia, Jill Turner saw firsthand the kind of havoc that drug addiction can wreak. "I had a lot of friends who had very promising lives and promising careers ahead of them," the assistant professor in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy says, "but they ended up either overdosing or going to jail for drug-related stuff. It's one of the reasons I went into drug addiction research." [More]
Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

An alarming 22 percent of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. [More]
Stanford researchers identify iron-containing microglia in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease

Stanford researchers identify iron-containing microglia in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease

Examining post-mortem tissue from the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators identified what appear to be iron-containing microglia -- specialized scavenger cells that sometimes become inflammatory -- in a particular part of the hippocampus, a key brain structure whose integrity is critical to memory formation. [More]
Retrosplenial cortex serves as 'conjunction junction' for brain's navigation function

Retrosplenial cortex serves as 'conjunction junction' for brain's navigation function

Ever wake at night needing a drink of water and then find your way to the kitchen in the dark without stubbing your toe? [More]
Georgia State University-led study identifies structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia patients

Georgia State University-led study identifies structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia patients

Structural brain abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia, providing insight into how the condition may develop and respond to treatment, have been identified in an internationally collaborative study led by a Georgia State University scientist. [More]
New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain. [More]
People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals. [More]
Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company using neural stem cell technology to develop small molecule and cell therapy treatments for central nervous system diseases, announced that the poster "Human Neural Stem Cells Expressing IGF-1: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease" was presented yesterday at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

University of California, Riverside psychologist Chandra A. Reynolds has been awarded a $7 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study how early childhood influences versus recent influences affect cognitive and physical health by middle age. [More]
Rats have happy dreams about tasty treats in the future

Rats have happy dreams about tasty treats in the future

When rats rest, their brains simulate journeys to a desired future such as a tasty treat, finds new UCL research funded by the Wellcome Trust and Royal Society. [More]
Fructose stimulates reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose

Fructose stimulates reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose

Fructose not only results in a lower level of satiety, it also stimulates the reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose. This may cause excessive consumption accompanied by effects that are a risk to health, report researchers from the University of Basel in a study published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. Various diseases have been attributed to industrial fructose in sugary drinks and ready meals. [More]

UC Berkeley study shows humans can navigate through their sense of smell

Like homing pigeons, humans have a nose for navigation because our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information, new research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows. [More]
Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

While participating in physical activities such as bike riding, dancing, walking and gardening and mentally stimulating activities such as crosswords and reading may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, they may not do so by affecting the underlying markers for the disease, according to a study published in the June 10, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce Alzheimer's risk

Study can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce Alzheimer's risk

Armed with new knowledge about how neurodegenerative diseases alter brain structures, increasing numbers of neurologists, psychiatrists and other clinicians are adopting quantitative brain imaging as a tool to measure and help manage cognitive declines in patients. These imaging findings can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Newly discovered nerve cells trigger locomotion, supply the brain with speed-related information

Newly discovered nerve cells trigger locomotion, supply the brain with speed-related information

Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the University of Bonn led by Prof. Stefan Remy report on this in the journal "Neuron". Their investigations give new insights into the workings of spatial memory. Furthermore, they could also help improve our understanding of movement related symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease. [More]

Research findings challenge the model of memory forming in hippocampus

The hippocampus plays a crucial role in memory formation. However, it is not yet fully understood in what way that brain structure's individual regions are involved in the formation of memories. Neuroscientists at the Collaborative Research Center 874 at RUB have recreated this process with the aid of computer simulations. [More]
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