Honey News and Research RSS Feed - Honey News and Research

Honey profiling for impurities and falsifications

Honey profiling for impurities and falsifications

Without testing commercially available honey, it is impossible to guarantee that is safe, natural and authentic. This is because bees are free agents, they cannot be restricted to a specific region, or to a type of plant that you would like them to pollinate. [More]
Researchers come up with new approach to stabilize vaccines at room temperature

Researchers come up with new approach to stabilize vaccines at room temperature

Shipping vaccines in an unbroken temperature-controlled supply chain (a "cold chain") all the way to recipients is a major logistical and financial challenge in remote areas and developing countries. [More]
Encouraging kids to learn about food may help build healthy habits

Encouraging kids to learn about food may help build healthy habits

More than nine in 10 millennial moms think it's important for their kids to learn about where their food comes from, and more than three-quarters of those moms actively do things with their kids to help learn just that, according to recent findings. [More]
New research shows how focusing on pleasure of food may help people choose smaller portions

New research shows how focusing on pleasure of food may help people choose smaller portions

The rapid rise in portion sizes has gone hand in hand with rising rates of obesity. To curb supersizing, governments and public health institutions have advocated portion size limits and health warnings, but they have had limited success. [More]
Fiscal policies could help reduce consumption of sugary drinks, new WHO report reveals

Fiscal policies could help reduce consumption of sugary drinks, new WHO report reveals

Taxing sugary drinks can lower consumption and reduce obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay, says a new World Health Organization report. [More]
Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury

Hyaluronidase enzyme may be effective treatment option for spasticity caused by neurological injury

A naturally occurring enzyme called hyaluronidase may be an effective alternative treatment for spasticity, or muscle stiffness, a disabling condition in people who have had a stroke or other brain injury. [More]
Ginger-derived nanoparticles may be good medicine for inflammatory bowel disease

Ginger-derived nanoparticles may be good medicine for inflammatory bowel disease

A recent study by researchers at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center took them to a not-so-likely destination: local farmers markets. They went in search of fresh ginger root. [More]
Cinnamon treatment turns poor-learning mice into good ones, research shows

Cinnamon treatment turns poor-learning mice into good ones, research shows

If Dr. Kalipada Pahan's research pans out, the standard advice for failing students might one day be: Study harder and eat your cinnamon! [More]
Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

Researchers aim to improve medical treatment for people with insect venom allergy

A team of researchers has elucidated individual profiles of allergy reactivity in patients that are not protected after treatment with immunotherapy. The aim is to improve medical treatment of people who are allergic to insect stings. [More]
High-fructose diet during pregnancy may affect fetal growth

High-fructose diet during pregnancy may affect fetal growth

Consuming a high-fructose diet during pregnancy may cause defects in the placenta and restrict fetal growth, potentially increasing a baby's risk for metabolic health problems later in life, according to research in mice and people by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Rare germ cell tumor creates unique bond between two young women

Rare germ cell tumor creates unique bond between two young women

Morgan Ellison and Madison McDaniel were diagnosed with a rare germ cell tumor of the ovary earlier this year. The two strangers would soon form a unique bond during their treatment in Birmingham, Alabama. [More]
Fructose common in western diet can damage brain genes

Fructose common in western diet can damage brain genes

A range of diseases -- from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer's disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are linked to changes to genes in the brain. A new study by UCLA life scientists has found that hundreds of those genes can be damaged by fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, in a way that could lead to those diseases. [More]
New study shows visuomotor errors accumulate during memory delay

New study shows visuomotor errors accumulate during memory delay

Who will win the women's singles tennis title at the 2016 Rio Olympics this August? That's a question recent York U brain research can help answer. [More]
Report highlights parlous state of British children's teeth

Report highlights parlous state of British children's teeth

The Local Government Association has today published a report that states that around 100 children and teenagers a day are being admitted to hospital for surgery to remove rotten teeth. [More]
Pittcon 2016: Bruker showcases new products and analytical solutions

Pittcon 2016: Bruker showcases new products and analytical solutions

This week at Pittcon 2016, Bruker is showcasing new products and analytical solutions for core Applied & Pharma markets, for our Nanoanalysis, Microscopy & Advanced Materials Research markets, as well as new after-market services and life-cycle support solutions for our customers. [More]
Nearly two-thirds of herbal medicines have potential health risks to cancer patients

Nearly two-thirds of herbal medicines have potential health risks to cancer patients

Nearly two-thirds of the herbal medicines used by cancer patients in the Middle East have potential health risks, according to a new survey led by Assistant Professor Eran Ben-Arye, of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. [More]
Loyola gastroenterologist provides tips to IBS patients for healthy living

Loyola gastroenterologist provides tips to IBS patients for healthy living

More than 20 percent of the US population lives with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and for many Americans it is an ongoing challenge. But when it comes to treatment, old advice from Mom was right. Often, the key is to eat right and go outside and play. [More]
Bruker’s NMR Food Screener laboratory granted accreditation

Bruker’s NMR Food Screener laboratory granted accreditation

Bruker announced that its NMR FoodScreener™ laboratory for food authenticity and quality determination, located in Rheinstetten, Germany, has been granted ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. [More]
ASU and three partner institutions awarded NSF grant to study how healthy brains create memories of odors

ASU and three partner institutions awarded NSF grant to study how healthy brains create memories of odors

Like most animals, we rely on our sense of smell for survival. It's critical to our health and an important factor in our quality of life. [More]
NBTY signs agreement to acquire Dr. Organic

NBTY signs agreement to acquire Dr. Organic

NBTY, Inc., a global leader in vitamins, nutritional supplements and sports nutrition, today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Dr. Organic, a leading naturally inspired skincare line in the UK. The deal is subject to customary closing conditions, and is expected to close later this year. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement