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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
ESSA Pharma receives final approval to start trading on Toronto Stock Exchange

ESSA Pharma receives final approval to start trading on Toronto Stock Exchange

ESSA Pharma Inc. is pleased to announce that it has received final approval for its common shares to be listed and commence trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange. [More]
Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

Brazilian cardiovascular researcher receives Georg Forster Research Award

The cardiovascular researcher Professor Robson Augusto Souza dos Santos of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, has been awarded the Georg Forster Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. [More]
Researchers find blood marker that can help identify women at particular risk for postpartum depression

Researchers find blood marker that can help identify women at particular risk for postpartum depression

Postpartum depression is a debilitating disorder that affects nearly 20 percent of new mothers, putting their infants at increased risk for poor behavioral, cognitive and social development. [More]
Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

Biologists identify genetic mechanisms behind anti-inflammatory impact of cortisone

There's no time to lose when an emergency doctor diagnoses „Shock lung!" at the accident scene. What physicians know as "acute lung injury" (ALI) otherwise leads to death by suffocation without immediate treatment. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Brown University explores effect of chemical exposures on the brain and thyroid during pregnancy, childhood

Brown University explores effect of chemical exposures on the brain and thyroid during pregnancy, childhood

Exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemicals bisphenol A, triclosan and phthalates is ubiquitous in the United States, raising concerns that they may affect health. With a new four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Brown University epidemiologist Joseph Braun will try to close a gap in research: the effect of these exposures on the brain and thyroid during pregnancy and childhood. [More]
Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers have discovered an experimental medication that treats hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms without the life-threatening risks of hormone replacement therapy, according to a team led by a UNT Health Science Center scientist. [More]
Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts - a risk factor for heart disease - than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. [More]
Dietary phosphate appears to cause spikes in blood phosphorus levels

Dietary phosphate appears to cause spikes in blood phosphorus levels

Phosphates artificially added to dairy and cereal products appear to cause bigger spikes in blood phosphorus levels than naturally occurring phosphates, potentially putting harmful stress on kidneys. Too much dietary phosphate stiffens blood vessels, enlarges the heart and is bad for bones, but a new study by Houston Methodist researchers suggests it matters where the phosphates come from. [More]
New CHLA study uncovers baseline characteristics of transyouth seeking care for gender dysphoria

New CHLA study uncovers baseline characteristics of transyouth seeking care for gender dysphoria

Johanna Olson, MD, and her colleagues at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, provide care for the largest number of transyouth in the U.S. and have enrolled 101 patients in a study to determine the safety and efficacy of treatment that helps patients bring their bodies into closer alignment with their gender of identity. [More]
New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer than European American men, and are also more than twice as likely to die from it. Although there are many reasons that contribute to this health disparity, new research shows that African American men may have a distinctly different type of prostate cancer than European American men, according to new genomic fingerprinting results. [More]
Breast cancer survivors in Appalachia not taking life-saving follow-up treatment, new study finds

Breast cancer survivors in Appalachia not taking life-saving follow-up treatment, new study finds

Nearly a third of breast cancer survivors in Appalachia are not taking the critical, potentially life-saving follow-up treatment - despite having insurance that would pay for it, a troubling new study has found. [More]
Study shows that moderate suppression of TSH may be enough even in high-risk thyroid cancer

Study shows that moderate suppression of TSH may be enough even in high-risk thyroid cancer

A study of long-term thyroid cancer outcomes shows, among other findings, that moderate suppression of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which drives the disease, may be as beneficial as more extreme hormone suppression. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find potential therapy to treat diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

UT Southwestern researchers find potential therapy to treat diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Reducing high concentrations of a fatty molecule that is commonly found in people with diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease rapidly improves insulin sensitivity, UT Southwestern Medical Center diabetes researchers have found. [More]
No significant research undertaken to prevent or treat PPCM in healthy pregnant women, study reveals

No significant research undertaken to prevent or treat PPCM in healthy pregnant women, study reveals

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare disorder characterized by weakened pumping of the heart, or "left ventricular dysfunction," which results in otherwise healthy pregnant women experiencing heart failure shortly before or up to five months after they deliver healthy babies. Despite the seriousness of this condition, a new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology revealed that no significant research has been undertaken to explore how to prevent or treat this disorder. [More]
Women with low levels of anti-stress hormone at increased risk of getting breast cancer

Women with low levels of anti-stress hormone at increased risk of getting breast cancer

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that women with low levels of an anti-stress hormone have an increased risk of getting breast cancer. The study is the first of its kind on humans and confirms previous similar observations from animal experiments. [More]
New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

A growing number of patient studies show that people who suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and heart attack. A new review article in American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology examines the recent scientific literature to explain how the two are linked. [More]
New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

A new laser sensor that monitors blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin could transform the lives of millions of people living with diabetes. [More]
Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication. [More]
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