Hormone News and Research RSS Feed - Hormone News and Research

A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to UTMB is approximately $2.5 million. [More]
Study sheds light on how animals regulate body size

Study sheds light on how animals regulate body size

The proper regulation of body size is of fundamental importance, but the mechanisms that stop growth are still unclear. In a study now published in the scientific journal eLife, a research group from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Christen Mirth, shed new light on how animals regulate body size. [More]
Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure. [More]
New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

New course underlines the importance of early detection of lung cancer

In Japan, 40 percent of lung cancer cases are detected on early stages and treated with a high probability of remission; in the US 20 percent of cases have that possibility, while in Mexico, in the National Cancer Institute (INCan), only 1.2 percent of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. [More]
More breast cancer patients choosing to undergo mastectomy, finds Vanderbilt study

More breast cancer patients choosing to undergo mastectomy, finds Vanderbilt study

Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows. In the past decade, there have also been marked trends toward higher proportions of women opting for breast reconstruction. [More]
Research reveals critical role natural antioxidant selenium plays in woman's fertility

Research reveals critical role natural antioxidant selenium plays in woman's fertility

University of Adelaide research has for the first time shown how much of a critical role the natural antioxidant selenium plays at the earliest stages of a woman's fertility. [More]
Research finding points to potential new treatment for metabolic disorders

Research finding points to potential new treatment for metabolic disorders

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered how a previously unknown hormone serves as a messenger from fat cells to the liver and are investigating the potential of developing a new treatment for metabolic disorders. [More]
Study: Critically ill newborns may be exposed to DEHP chemicals in medical products

Study: Critically ill newborns may be exposed to DEHP chemicals in medical products

Hospitalized premature infants are exposed to unsafe levels of a chemical found in numerous medical products used to treat them, raising questions about whether critically ill newborns may be adversely affected by equipment designed to help save their lives. [More]
Oxytocin hormone inhibits fear center in brain, shows study

Oxytocin hormone inhibits fear center in brain, shows study

Frightening experiences do not quickly fade from memory. A team of researchers under the guidance of the University of Bonn Hospital has now been able to demonstrate in a study that the bonding hormone oxytocin inhibits the fear center in the brain and allows fear stimuli to subside more easily. [More]
Genetic testing, risk factor assessment could improve prevention strategies for breast cancer

Genetic testing, risk factor assessment could improve prevention strategies for breast cancer

Scientists used mathematical models to show that analysing genetic data, alongside a range of other risk factors, could substantially improve the ability to flag up women at highest risk of developing breast cancer. [More]
Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

What makes some women more susceptible to heart disease than others? To help answer that question, researchers at Western University's Robarts Research Institute have identified that an estrogen receptor, previously shown to regulate blood pressure in women, also plays an important role in regulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. [More]
Researchers develop genetic test to predict prostate cancer recurrence

Researchers develop genetic test to predict prostate cancer recurrence

Prostate cancer researchers have developed a genetic test to identify which men are at highest risk for their prostate cancer to come back after localized treatment with surgery or radiotherapy. [More]
New DNA-based test could better predict treatment outcomes for prostate cancer patients

New DNA-based test could better predict treatment outcomes for prostate cancer patients

Researchers at The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and University Health Network, have identified a new DNA-based test that could be used to better predict how prostate cancer patients will respond to treatment and to prevent relapse. [More]
RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

Cancer researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have identified two independent classes of novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer, advancing efforts to develop targeted therapies for the disease. The findings resulted from two separate studies published in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE and based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the world's largest public database on gene expression in different tumor types. [More]
Stockholm researchers discover new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat

Stockholm researchers discover new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat

Research findings that can likely be used to develop a new type of medicine for type 2 diabetes are published today in the Journal of Cell Biology. Researchers at Stockholm University have discovered a new mechanism that stimulates glucose uptake in brown fat - a tissue whose primary function is to generate heat by burning fat and sugar. [More]
Worst effects of reperfusion injury after heart attack may be prevented with iodide

Worst effects of reperfusion injury after heart attack may be prevented with iodide

Blocked arteries are typically the trigger, stopping the flow of blood and starving the heart muscle of oxygen. But when the blockage is removed and the blood comes rushing back, it wreaks havoc of its own. The result is called reperfusion injury, a life-threatening flood of inflammation and cellular destruction that has stumped scientists for 40 years. [More]
Researchers obtain detailed picture of how Gas5 RNA interacts with steroid hormone receptors

Researchers obtain detailed picture of how Gas5 RNA interacts with steroid hormone receptors

It arises from what scientists previously described as "junk DNA" or "the dark matter of the genome," but this gene is definitely not junk. [More]
New study explains role of cilia in type 2 diabetes

New study explains role of cilia in type 2 diabetes

Tiny extensions on cells, cilia, play an important role in insulin release, according to a new study, which is published in Nature Communications. The researchers report that the cilia of beta cells in the pancreas are covered with insulin receptors and that changed ciliary function can be associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. [More]
Study: Hot flashes are not adequately managed in patients treated for breast cancer

Study: Hot flashes are not adequately managed in patients treated for breast cancer

Hot flushes are one of the most distressing conditions faced by women who have been treated for breast cancer, but they are not being adequately addressed by healthcare professionals and some women consider giving up their post cancer medication to try and stop them, a new study has shown. [More]
Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

Light-activated diabetes drug: an interview with Dr David Hodson

We've known about chemicals that can be light-activated for about five to ten years now. They’ve mainly all been applied to neurons and, more specifically, the retina. Nobody has ever really looked at any tissues outside of the nervous system. [More]