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A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another.
Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

Testosterone, cortisol hormones may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks

The hormones testosterone and cortisol may destabilise financial markets by making traders take more risks, according to a study. Researchers simulated the trading floor in the lab by having volunteers buy and sell assets among themselves. They measured the volunteers' natural hormone levels in one experiment and artificially raised them in another. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

A novel synthetic hormone that makes certain skin cells produce more melanin significantly increases pain-free sun exposure in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare, genetic disorder resulting in excruciating pain within minutes of sun exposure. [More]
Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

The stress hormone cortisol strengthens memories of scary experiences. However, it is effective not only while the memory is being formed for the first time, but also later when people look back at an experience while the memory reconsolidates. This has been published by cognition psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal "Neuropsychopharmacology". [More]
Scientists develop implantable 'artificial pancreas' to help control blood sugar in diabetes patients

Scientists develop implantable 'artificial pancreas' to help control blood sugar in diabetes patients

Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research the development of an implantable "artificial pancreas" that continuously measures a person's blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed. [More]
Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]
Research: Fetuses more vulnerable to some pollutants that penetrate into feto-maternal system

Research: Fetuses more vulnerable to some pollutants that penetrate into feto-maternal system

Toxic environmental contaminants are increasingly known to cause a number of severe health problems, in particular on fetuses, including heart failure, low cognitive ability, delayed development, and neurobehavioral disorders. [More]
Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

When you're having trouble sleeping, light is the last thing you assume you need. But according to a pilot study attempting to solve insomnia among lung cancer patients led by University at Buffalo sleep researcher Grace Dean, light may just be the answer. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Aeterna Zentaris selects Ergomed to manage Phase 3 clinical study of Macrilen

Aeterna Zentaris selects Ergomed to manage Phase 3 clinical study of Macrilen

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. announced today that it has executed a definitive agreement with Ergomed PLC, pursuant to which Ergomed will manage the new, confirmatory Phase 3 clinical study to demonstrate the efficacy of Macrilen (macimorelin), a novel orally-active ghrelin agonist for use in evaluating adult growth hormone deficiency ("AGHD"). [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
Novo Nordisk presents new data detailing the impact of hemophilia on patients, caregivers

Novo Nordisk presents new data detailing the impact of hemophilia on patients, caregivers

Today, Novo Nordisk presented new data detailing the impact hemophilia has on both caregivers and those living with the disease. [More]
New device tracks chemical messages that regulate cell growth

New device tracks chemical messages that regulate cell growth

Biomedical engineers at the University of Toronto have invented a new device that more quickly and accurately "listens in" on the chemical messages that tell our cells how to multiply. [More]
Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Patients with type 2 diabetes have a dysfunctional sugar metabolism because the essential hormone insulin does not work effectively. Once the disease reaches an advanced stage, the body stops producing insulin altogether, which means that it has to be administered externally. [More]
PSMA can be an ideal target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

PSMA can be an ideal target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a surface protein that is normally present on healthy prostate cells, but is found at much higher levels on prostate cancer cells. It is barely found in the rest of the body. "Therefore, PSMA is an ideal target for diagnostic purposes as well as targeted therapies against prostate cancer," says biotechnologist Dr. Matthias Eder of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ). [More]
Vaxil's ImMucin receives FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of multiple myeloma

Vaxil's ImMucin receives FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of multiple myeloma

Vaxil Bio, a company specializing in the development of immunotherapy-based drugs, reports today that its lead product, ImMucin, has been granted an "orphan drug" designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). [More]
Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Recently, researchers have discovered that the hormone progesterone, an ingredient in contraceptives and menopausal hormone replacement therapies, might stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells that are resistant to anti-estrogen therapy and chemotherapy. [More]
Water retention linked to changes in sex hormone levels

Water retention linked to changes in sex hormone levels

Water retention—a cause of bloating—is associated with changes in sex hormone levels. Many women experience water retention during menopause, but how sex hormones affect water balance is not understood. A new study in in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology sheds light on the connection, finding that sex hormones can directly control how the body reabsorbs water. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
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