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Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

In Switzerland, between 300,000 and 700,000 patients per year visit a doctor due to acute diarrhoea. Until now, the financial burden on the Swiss health care system had been completely unclear. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Study: Risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during Rio Olympics low

Study: Risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during Rio Olympics low

The risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during the Rio Olympics is very low, according to a new study involving mathematicians at the University of Strathclyde. [More]
Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Seventy million people in this country - 20 percent of the US population -- will be 65 or older by 2030. If you're one of them, you probably think often about how to stay as fit and healthy as possible. But, you may not be giving as much thought to the health of your teeth. [More]
Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

A bird species that does a poor job spreading West Nile virus (WNV) but is particularly likely to get mosquito bites may explain why human infections with the disease are relatively uncommon in Atlanta, Georgia—despite evidence of high rates of virus circulating in the local bird population, according to a new study published online today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [More]
Biomimicry could be promising approach for accelerating sustainable product innovation

Biomimicry could be promising approach for accelerating sustainable product innovation

A case study, "Biomimicry: Streamlining the Front End of Innovation for Environmentally Sustainable Products," shows that biomimicry, a relatively new field that seeks to emulate nature to find solutions to human problems, can potentially expand intellectual property, increase energy savings and accelerate product innovation. [More]
Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center nd New York State Psychiatric Institute have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. [More]
WHO works with Ministry of Health to ramp up disease surveillance, treatment efforts to prevent cholera outbreak

WHO works with Ministry of Health to ramp up disease surveillance, treatment efforts to prevent cholera outbreak

In a move to prevent a cholera outbreak from spreading, the Ministry of Health of South Sudan with support from the World Health Organization and health partners are ramping up disease surveillance and treatment efforts. [More]
Basic hygienic practices and adherence to decolonization protocols can reduce MRSA infections

Basic hygienic practices and adherence to decolonization protocols can reduce MRSA infections

A new study found that following basic hygienic practices and complying with protocols for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) decolonization reduces the time to clearance of the bacteria more quickly than a treatment regimen of antibiotic ointment and antiseptic body wash. [More]
METTLER TOLEDO’s new free guide could help improve moisture content analysis protocols

METTLER TOLEDO’s new free guide could help improve moisture content analysis protocols

The moisture content of foods, pharmaceuticals, and other materials affects their processability and price and helps to guarantee freshness, potency and safety. [More]
Children who experience inadequate sleep more likely to develop depression, anxiety later in life

Children who experience inadequate sleep more likely to develop depression, anxiety later in life

When asked how lack of sleep affects emotions, common responses are usually grumpy, foggy and short-tempered. [More]
Self-care: achieving accessibility safely. An interview with Zephanie Jordan

Self-care: achieving accessibility safely. An interview with Zephanie Jordan

Self-care can be broadly defined to include measures taken by an individual in the pursuit of obtaining or maintaining good health. It ranges from healthy eating and exercise to good hygiene practices to appropriate use of products such as dietary supplements and over-the-counter medicines to accessing health promoting services. [More]
Increasing rates of new HIV infections threaten 74 countries

Increasing rates of new HIV infections threaten 74 countries

AIDS deaths are falling in most countries worldwide, but the rate of new infections increased in several countries over the past decade, threatening to undermine efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, a new scientific paper shows. [More]
Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

The War on Drugs, mass incarceration of drug users, and the failure to provide proven harm reduction and treatment strategies has led to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B and C infection among prisoners—far higher than in the general population. [More]
Rare antibiotic compound detected in fungi for first time

Rare antibiotic compound detected in fungi for first time

Besides mushrooms such as truffles or morels, also many yeast and mould fungi, as well as other filamentous fungi belong to the Ascomycota phylum. They produce metabolic products which can act as natural antibiotics to combat bacteria and other pathogens. Penicillin, one of the oldest antibiotic agents, is probably the best known example. [More]
Study reveals problems encountered when trying to avoid plastic exposure

Study reveals problems encountered when trying to avoid plastic exposure

The well-known documentary "Plastic Planet" by Werner Boote starkly illustrates the dangers of plastic and synthetics for human beings and also shows how ubiquitous plastic is. [More]
Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Zoonotic diseases are diseases or infections which are naturally transmissible from animals to humans, as defined in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. [More]
New multicomponent reactions to develop active compounds against sleeping sickness

New multicomponent reactions to develop active compounds against sleeping sickness

Multicomponent reactions are protocols that ease the chemical synthesis of new compounds, and are particularly important to gain molecules with biological activity as therapeutic agents against several pathogens. [More]
New home-based intervention aims to improve health outcomes of children of South Asian immigrants

New home-based intervention aims to improve health outcomes of children of South Asian immigrants

More than one-third of Bronx residents are born outside of the United States. Often separated from family, challenged by language barriers, unfamiliar with health resources, and burdened by poverty, they are at high risk for health problems. And these risks extend to their young children. [More]
Childhood exposure to microbes through thumb-sucking, nail-biting may lower risk of allergies

Childhood exposure to microbes through thumb-sucking, nail-biting may lower risk of allergies

Children who suck their thumbs or bite their nails may be less likely to develop allergies, according to a new study from New Zealand's University of Otago. [More]
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