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Study provides new ways to avert annual heat-related deaths

Study provides new ways to avert annual heat-related deaths

By the 2080s, as many as 3,331 people could die every year from exposure to heat during the summer months in New York City. The high estimate by Columbia University scientists is based on a new model--the first to account for variability in future population size, greenhouse gas trajectories, and the extent to which residents adapt to heat through interventions like air conditioning and public cooling centers. [More]
Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

Mobile devices of healthcare workers often contaminated by viral RNA

In clinical settings, mobile phones benefit patients by placing useful data and information at the fingertips of health professionals during interactions on the ward. [More]
Food allergies linked to diet and gut microbiome

Food allergies linked to diet and gut microbiome

The development of food allergies in mice can be linked to what their gut bacteria are being fed, reports a study published June 21 in Cell Reports. Rodents that received a diet with average calories, sugar, and fiber content from birth were shown to have more severe peanut allergies than those that received a high-fiber diet. [More]
New study sheds light on sexual health of gay and bisexual men

New study sheds light on sexual health of gay and bisexual men

More gay and bisexual men than ever are getting tested for HIV, according to new data from the National Gay Men's Sex Survey. The survey is the largest of its kind in the UK and sheds light on the sexual health of men who have sex with men. [More]
ECDC warns risk of gastrointestinal illness and vector-borne infections at Rio de Janeiro Olympics

ECDC warns risk of gastrointestinal illness and vector-borne infections at Rio de Janeiro Olympics

Visitors to the 2016 Olympics and Paralympics Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil will be most at risk of gastrointestinal illness and vector-borne infections concludes ECDC's updated rapid risk assessment on the Games. [More]
Emergence of multidrug-resistant salmonella strains increases burden of neglected diseases in Africa

Emergence of multidrug-resistant salmonella strains increases burden of neglected diseases in Africa

"The affected countries will have a major problem if we do not manage to control salmonella bloodstream infections with new antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin," cautions Prof Jürgen May. [More]
Comprehensive workplace hand hygiene program helps reduce medical insurance claims for illnesses

Comprehensive workplace hand hygiene program helps reduce medical insurance claims for illnesses

A workplace outcome study published in The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that offices equipped with alcohol-based hand sanitizers and hand sanitizing wipes throughout the building and at employees' desks resulted in 24.3 percent fewer healthcare claims for hand hygiene preventable illnesses -- such as cold, flu and respiratory illnesses -- than the office and employees in the control group without these products. [More]
Military personnel with insomnia symptoms less resilient than members with healthy sleep hygiene

Military personnel with insomnia symptoms less resilient than members with healthy sleep hygiene

A new study found that military service members who reported insomnia symptoms or short sleep durations were less resilient than members who reported healthy sleep hygiene. [More]
Japan-based researchers find new tool to predict risk of Zika virus transmission

Japan-based researchers find new tool to predict risk of Zika virus transmission

A new tool by Japan-based researchers predicts the risk of Zika virus importation and local transmission for 189 countries. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Rates of teenage pregnancy in England have halved since the implementation of the Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS) in 1999, and the greatest effect is seen in areas of high deprivation and areas that received the most TPS funding, according to research published in The Lancet. [More]
Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, and the "Saving Brains" partners today announced investments in nine creative ways to protect and nurture the cognitive development of children in developing countries. [More]
Experts find vast mental health treatment gap in China and India

Experts find vast mental health treatment gap in China and India

A third of the global burden of disease for mental, neurological and substance use disorders occurs in India and China – more than in all high-income countries combined – yet most people with mental disorders in these countries do not receive needed treatment. [More]
Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King's College London. [More]
Single sputum sample approach to TB diagnosis provides rapid, accurate results

Single sputum sample approach to TB diagnosis provides rapid, accurate results

A streamlined approach to tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis requiring a single sputum sample and providing rapid, accurate results to patients proved feasible in rural Uganda, according to research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
Could worm infection counter IBD? An interview with Dr Loke and Dr Cadwell

Could worm infection counter IBD? An interview with Dr Loke and Dr Cadwell

The hygiene hypothesis refers to the idea that decreased exposure to certain infectious agents (because of better hygiene) is the reason why we have seen an increase in inflammatory diseases in the developed world. [More]
Study finds no link between weekend staffing levels and patient deaths

Study finds no link between weekend staffing levels and patient deaths

The ‘weekend effect’ – that patients admitted to hospital over the weekend are at an increased risk of death – overshadows a much more complex pattern of weekly changes in quality of care, which are unlikely to be addressed by simply increasing the availability of hospital doctors on Saturdays and Sundays, according to two new studies published in The Lancet. [More]
Point-of-care test could help detect TB in HIV-positive individuals

Point-of-care test could help detect TB in HIV-positive individuals

An international review team has prepared a Cochrane systematic review to assess the accuracy of a point-of-care urine test for diagnosing and screening tuberculosis (TB) in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Yellow fever outbreak: Researchers emphasize need to prepare for global health emergency

Yellow fever outbreak: Researchers emphasize need to prepare for global health emergency

Evidence is mounting that the current outbreak of yellow fever is becoming the latest global health emergency, say two Georgetown University professors, who call on the World Health Organization to convene an emergency committee under the International Health Regulations. In addition, with frequent emerging epidemics, they call for the creation of a "standing emergency committee" to be prepared for future health emergencies. [More]
Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Exchange of immunization data between a centralized city immunization registry and provider electronic health records led to significant improvements in pediatric immunization coverage, a reduction in over-immunization for adolescents, and increased completeness of immunization records, according to a study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian, and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Citywide Immunization Registry. [More]
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