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Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Despite having policies in place to prevent infections, staff at outpatient care facilities fail to follow recommendations for hand hygiene 37 percent of the time, and for safe injection practices 33 percent of the time, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
New research demonstrates effectiveness of six-step hand-hygiene technique for reducing bacteria

New research demonstrates effectiveness of six-step hand-hygiene technique for reducing bacteria

New research demonstrates that the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is superior to a three-step method suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in reducing bacteria on healthcare workers' hands. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Proposed charging of migrants for use of the NHS is against government principles

Proposed charging of migrants for use of the NHS is against government principles

Proposals put forward by the government to charge non-EEA residents for access to the NHS have failed to comply with principles the government originally set. [More]
Better oral hygiene, regular dental visits could slow down cognitive decline in older adults

Better oral hygiene, regular dental visits could slow down cognitive decline in older adults

Better oral hygiene and regular dental visits may play a role in slowing cognitive decline as people age, although evidence is not definitive enough to suggest that one causes the other. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine may help fight latest flare-up in Guinea

Experimental Ebola vaccine may help fight latest flare-up in Guinea

Hundreds of people who may have been in contact with 8 individuals infected with Ebola virus in Guinea’s southern prefectures of Nzérékoré and Macenta have been vaccinated with the experimental Ebola vaccine in a bid to contain the latest flare-up of Ebola. [More]
Study finds correlation between male sex hormones and oral health

Study finds correlation between male sex hormones and oral health

More than 20 species of macaques, the most widely distributed nonhuman primates in the world, socialize in lively troops and make frequent appearances on National Geographic documentaries. But, what can we learn from one of our closest primate relatives about our own oral health? [More]
Research describes first new mouse model for Zika infection in decades

Research describes first new mouse model for Zika infection in decades

Efforts to combat the rapid spread of Zika virus got a boost this week as researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (UTMB) announced the first peer-reviewed publication of a mouse model for Zika infection reported in decades. [More]
New report finds 'double burden of malnutrition’ in South East Asia

New report finds 'double burden of malnutrition’ in South East Asia

A joint report from UNICEF, WHO and ASEAN has shed new light on the nutrition situation of children across South East Asia. The report finds that several ASEAN countries are facing simultaneous crises of over and undernutrition, with some children overweight while their peers suffer from stunting and wasting. [More]
New worldwide collaboration aims to speed up effective diagnosis of TB

New worldwide collaboration aims to speed up effective diagnosis of TB

As World TB day (24 March) marks global efforts to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health problem by 2035, Oxford University researchers, in partnership with Public Health England (PHE), will lead a new worldwide collaboration called CRyPTIC to speed up diagnosis of the disease. [More]

ICUH 2016 aims to improve health in cities worldwide

Hundreds of researchers, educators, community leaders, practitioners, and policy makers from all regions of the world will convene in San Francisco, California from April 1-4 to advance understanding of actions needed to improve health and health equity in cities worldwide. [More]
Preventing blindness through portable eye examinations: an interview with Dr Mario Ettore Giardini

Preventing blindness through portable eye examinations: an interview with Dr Mario Ettore Giardini

The number of blind people is high. In 2010, the World Health Organisation estimated that, throughout the world, approximately 39 million people are blind. [More]
Study assesses acceptability of alternative drug to prevent malaria among pregnant women in Kenya

Study assesses acceptability of alternative drug to prevent malaria among pregnant women in Kenya

Researchers at LSTM, working with colleagues at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention USA, the Kenya Medical Research Institute, and from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, have completed a study to assess the acceptability among pregnant women and health providers in Kenya of a new drug as an alternative to the standard drug used to prevent malaria in pregnancy. [More]
Older types of arthritis medicine appear to be dangerous for the heart

Older types of arthritis medicine appear to be dangerous for the heart

Many Danes are prescribed NSAIDs for the treatment of painful conditions, fever and inflammation. But the treatment also comes with side effects, including the risk of ulcers and increased blood pressure. [More]
New study further supports link between Zika virus and microcephaly

New study further supports link between Zika virus and microcephaly

New research, based on data from the 2013-14 Zika outbreak in French Polynesia, further supports the association between Zika virus and microcephaly. [More]
One-fourth of seniors acquire new superbugs during hospital stay

One-fourth of seniors acquire new superbugs during hospital stay

One in four seniors is bringing along stowaways from the hospital to their next stop: superbugs on their hands.Moreover, seniors who go to a nursing home or other post-acute care facility will continue to acquire new superbugs during their stay, according to findings made by University of Michigan researchers published today in a JAMA Internal Medicine research letter. [More]
Promoting breastfeeding as 'natural' way could result in harmful decision-making, experts warn

Promoting breastfeeding as 'natural' way could result in harmful decision-making, experts warn

Breastfeeding campaigns that extol breastfeeding as the "natural" way to feed infants could result in harmful decision-making by some parents on other important health matters, according to experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Discovery of new strain of bacteria could aid in developing effective oral probiotic

Discovery of new strain of bacteria could aid in developing effective oral probiotic

University of Florida Health researchers have identified a new strain of bacteria in the mouth that may keep bad bacteria in check -- and could lead to a way to prevent cavities using probiotics.The researchers say the findings could lead to the development of a supplement that patients could take orally to prevent cavities [More]
Periodontitis linked to greater rates of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease patients

Periodontitis linked to greater rates of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease patients

A new study, jointly led by the University of Southampton and King's College London, has found a link between gum disease and greater rates of cognitive decline in people with early stages of Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
Many women have short length of stay after childbirth, new study finds

Many women have short length of stay after childbirth, new study finds

A substantial proportion of women in countries around the world do not stay in health facilities for long enough after giving birth, which could result in them receiving inadequate postnatal care, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Early childhood sleep problems predict later school adjustment

Early childhood sleep problems predict later school adjustment

A child who soothes themselves back to sleep from an early age adjusts to school more easily than those who don't, new QUT research has found. [More]
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