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New coalition formed to boost colorectal cancer screening rates in New York City

New coalition formed to boost colorectal cancer screening rates in New York City

A coalition formed by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene which included a team from Mount Sinai to increase colorectal cancer screening rates in New York City resulted in a 40 percent increase in screening rates over four years. [More]
Experts share 10 steps to prevent future disease outbreaks

Experts share 10 steps to prevent future disease outbreaks

An independent group of 19 experts from around the globe, convened by the Harvard Global Health Institute and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, has issued a hard-hitting analysis of the global response to the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, published in The Lancet. [More]
Georgetown health law experts propose fundamental reform for International Health Regulations

Georgetown health law experts propose fundamental reform for International Health Regulations

A trio of global health law experts from Georgetown warn the window for fundamental reform of the International Health Regulations -- opened by the Ebola epidemic -- is 'rapidly closing.' [More]
WHO: Strong actions needed to address climate change to protect people's health

WHO: Strong actions needed to address climate change to protect people's health

According to WHO estimates, climate change is already causing tens of thousands of deaths every year - from shifting patterns of disease, from extreme weather events, such as heat-waves and floods, and from the degradation of air quality, food and water supplies, and sanitation. [More]
Micronic Follows Stringent Sample Storage Standards

Micronic Follows Stringent Sample Storage Standards

With a working volume of 1.14ml*, Micronic 1.40ml round bottom tubes are proven to be an industry standard solution for many sample storage applications. [More]
Treating insomnia through a CBT device? An interview with Dr Ebrahim

Treating insomnia through a CBT device? An interview with Dr Ebrahim

Insomnia refers to a clinical condition that is characterised by one or more of the following – difficulty initiating sleep and/or maintaining sleep and/or waking up too early AND associated with symptoms the next day such as sleepiness, lethargy, loss of concentration. [More]
FDA finalizes innovative food safety rules to prevent foodborne illness

FDA finalizes innovative food safety rules to prevent foodborne illness

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today took major steps to prevent foodborne illness by finalizing rules implementing the bipartisan Food Safety Modernization Act that, for the first time, establish enforceable safety standards for produce farms and make importers accountable for verifying that imported food meets U.S. safety standards. [More]
Maternal mortality down 44% since 1990

Maternal mortality down 44% since 1990

Maternal mortality has fallen by 44% since 1990, United Nations agencies and the World Bank Group reported today. [More]
New report highlights progress made in preventable maternal deaths

New report highlights progress made in preventable maternal deaths

Maternal mortality has fallen by 44% since 1990, United Nations agencies and the World Bank Group reported today. [More]
OCD patients can benefit from exposure and response prevention therapy when drug treatment options fail

OCD patients can benefit from exposure and response prevention therapy when drug treatment options fail

Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can improve their symptoms significantly by adding exposure and response prevention therapy to their treatment regimen when common drug treatment options have failed, according to new research from psychiatrists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
UGA to use $2.1 million grant to explore effects of feeding wildlife at public parks

UGA to use $2.1 million grant to explore effects of feeding wildlife at public parks

People feeding white ibises at public parks are turning the normally independent birds into beggars, and now researchers at the University of Georgia say it might also be helping spread disease. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers awarded $14 million PCORI grant for hepatitis C research

Montefiore and Einstein researchers awarded $14 million PCORI grant for hepatitis C research

A research team at Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine led by Alain Litwin, M.D., was awarded $14 million by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to determine how best to treat hepatitis C among people who inject drugs (PWID), a group with a high rate of infection. [More]
Two studies explore potential new blood tests for Alzheimer's disease

Two studies explore potential new blood tests for Alzheimer's disease

There is increasing evidence that the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease begin decades before memory and thinking problems occur, prompting the need for better methods of early detection for this progressive, fatal brain disease. Consequently, there is a growing school of thought that the most effective future Alzheimer's drug therapies will be administered to those who are at high risk of the disease before cognitive symptoms appear. [More]
CareFusion to display new respiratory solutions at AARC Congress

CareFusion to display new respiratory solutions at AARC Congress

CareFusion, a BD company, will be displaying new respiratory solutions that are designed to put patients first, whether ventilated or breathing on their own, at the American Association for Respiratory Care Congress being held Nov. 7-10 in Tampa, Fla. [More]
Researchers successfully test new method for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in Guinea

Researchers successfully test new method for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in Guinea

An international team of researchers, including Ahmed Abd El Wahed, scientist at the University of Göttingen and the German Primate Center, has tested a new method for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in a field trial in Guinea. The test procedure was carried out using a portable suitcase laboratory. The mobile suitcase lab is operated with solar power and enables simple on-site diagnostics in remote areas without the need of an equipped laboratory. [More]
Hospital evidence-based practice centers can effectively inform decision-making in medical settings

Hospital evidence-based practice centers can effectively inform decision-making in medical settings

Amid continued pressures to minimize errors and cut costs, hospitals are continuing to scramble to find solutions to problems plaguing health systems nationwide. [More]
Delay in hospital admittance increases risk of death for Ebola patients during epidemics

Delay in hospital admittance increases risk of death for Ebola patients during epidemics

A retrospective study of Ebola epidemics in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) suggested that each day of delay in hospital admittance was associated with an 11% increased risk of death for Ebola patients during epidemics. [More]
APHA Law Section honors Lawrence Gostin for Lifetime Achievement in Public Health Law

APHA Law Section honors Lawrence Gostin for Lifetime Achievement in Public Health Law

Lawrence Gostin, JD, LLD (h.c.), Faculty Director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown Law, was honored today for his "Lifetime Achievement in Public Health Law" by the American Public Health Association (APHA) Law Section. The award was presented in Chicago. [More]
Chronic pain sufferers may benefit from therapy to help them sleep better, study finds

Chronic pain sufferers may benefit from therapy to help them sleep better, study finds

Research conducted at the University of Warwick indicates that chronic pain sufferers could benefit from therapy to help them sleep better. [More]
Over 3.7 billion people under 50 have genital HSV-1 infection, shows WHO report

Over 3.7 billion people under 50 have genital HSV-1 infection, shows WHO report

More than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 – or 67% of the population – are infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), according to the World Health Organization’s first global estimates of HSV-1 infection published today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
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