Immunodeficiency News and Research RSS Feed - Immunodeficiency News and Research

Immunodeficiency (or immune deficiency) is a state in which the immune system's ability to fight infectious disease is compromised or entirely absent.
Researchers make surprising discoveries about the body's early responses to HIV infection

Researchers make surprising discoveries about the body's early responses to HIV infection

Researchers at UC Davis have made some surprising discoveries about the body's initial responses to HIV infection. Studying simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), the team found that specialized cells in the intestine called Paneth cells are early responders to viral invasion and are the source of gut inflammation by producing a cytokine called interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). [More]
Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. [More]
School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98% of students in U.S. public schools to diagnose primary immunodeficiency

School nurses reach 98 percent of the 50,000,000 students in U.S. public schools, grades k-12, and are uniquely positioned to facilitate the early diagnosis of serious medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency (PI). [More]
TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found. [More]
FDA approves ViiV Healthcare's Triumeq tablets for treatment of HIV-1 infection

FDA approves ViiV Healthcare's Triumeq tablets for treatment of HIV-1 infection

ViiV Healthcare announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Triumeq (abacavir 600mg, dolutegravir 50mg and lamivudine 300mg) tablets for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]

Study underscores the importance of newborn screening for Bubble Boy disease

The Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF) applauds a new study published August 19, 2014 in the Journal of the American Medical Association that underscores the importance of newborn screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), also known as Bubble Boy disease. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
Newborn screening indicates that incidence of SCID is higher than previously believed

Newborn screening indicates that incidence of SCID is higher than previously believed

Newborn screening performed in numerous states indicates that the incidence of the potentially life-threatening disorder, severe combined immunodeficiency, is higher than previously believed, at 1 in 58,000 births, although there is a high rate of survival, according to a study in the August 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers find method to repair gene mutation causing autoimmune deficiency disease

Researchers find method to repair gene mutation causing autoimmune deficiency disease

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a method to repair the gene mutation causing agammaglobulinemia, an autoimmune deficiency disease that almost exclusively affects boys and in which the body lacks the ability to produce immunoglobulins (gamma globulin). [More]
Combination of NASBA and real-time qPCR detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy

Combination of NASBA and real-time qPCR detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy

The fungal infection invasive aspergillosis (IA) can be life threatening, especially in patients whose immune systems are weakened by chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs. Despite the critical need for early detection, IA remains difficult to diagnose. [More]
Researcher examines effectiveness of brief interventions for reducing problem drug use

Researcher examines effectiveness of brief interventions for reducing problem drug use

Peter Roy-Byrne, M.D., formerly of the University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues write that few data exist on the effectiveness of brief (1-2 sessions) interventions for reducing problem drug use, a common issue in disadvantaged populations seeking care in safety-net medical settings (hospitals and community health clinics serving low-income patients with limited or no insurance). [More]
States of Maine and Rhode Island add SCID to newborn screening panels

States of Maine and Rhode Island add SCID to newborn screening panels

The Immune Deficiency Foundation commends the states of Maine and Rhode Island for adding Severe Combined Immune Deficiency to their states' newborn screening panels, effective August 1, 2014. These states join 21 other states currently screening newborns for SCID, ensuring over two thirds of all babies in the U.S. are now being screened. [More]
Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Blood-forming stem cell transplantation benefits infants with severe combined immunodeficiency

Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, MD, a world-renowned pioneer in the development of transplant protocols. [More]
Clinic-based audio project gives HIV patients a chance to share experiences with diagnosis

Clinic-based audio project gives HIV patients a chance to share experiences with diagnosis

The voice on the recording was low and calm as the speaker recounted the telephone call that brought the news he was infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS: "My heart just stopped for a little bit and next thing you know I was on the floor flat on my face boohooing, crying like a baby." [More]
Chemclin's HIV kits for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-HIV 1+2

Chemclin's HIV kits for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-HIV 1+2

Chemclin's HIV kits are available for in-vitro qualitative determination of Antibody to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Type 2 (Anti-HIV 1+2) and P24 antigen of HIV in human serum or plasma by a sandwich chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Psychology residency training program receives federal funding for 5th consecutive grant cycle

Psychology residency training program receives federal funding for 5th consecutive grant cycle

A psychology residency training program that's a joint effort of the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and the Charlie Norwood Veterans Affairs Medical Center has received federal funding for the fifth consecutive grant cycle. [More]
Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

In a preliminary study, HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat who received the growth hormone-releasing hormone analog tesamorelin for 6 months experienced modest reductions in liver fat, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]

HIV self-testing increases proportion of adults initiating antiretroviral therapy

Among adults in the African country of Malawi offered HIV self-testing, optional home initiation of care compared with standard HIV care resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of adults initiating antiretroviral therapy, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]

Annual HIV diagnosis rate in the U.S. decreases more than 30%: Study

The annual HIV diagnosis rate in the U.S. decreased more than 30 percent from 2002-2011, with declines observed in several key populations, although increases were found among certain age groups of men who have sex with men, especially young men, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]