Immunodeficiency News and Research RSS Feed - Immunodeficiency News and Research

Immunodeficiency (or immune deficiency) is a state in which the immune system's ability to fight infectious disease is compromised or entirely absent.
Chemical drug safely controls side effects associated with haploidentical stem cell transplantation

Chemical drug safely controls side effects associated with haploidentical stem cell transplantation

Researchers in the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist and Texas Children's Hospital have found that a single dose of an otherwise harmless drug can safely control the severe and often lethal side effects associated with haploidentical stem cell transplantation. [More]
ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare today announced the start of a Phase III clinical trial programme to evaluate the safety and efficacy of dolutegravir (Tivicay) and rilpivirine (Edurant) as maintenance therapy for adult patients with HIV. [More]
AIDS patients at increased risk of developing intermediate-stage AMD

AIDS patients at increased risk of developing intermediate-stage AMD

Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have a four-fold increase in their risk of developing intermediate-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared to people of the same age who are not infected with HIV, according to results from the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA) presented today at the 2015 ARVO Annual Meeting in Denver, CO. [More]
Chickenpox virus can cause strokes in patients with compromised immune systems

Chickenpox virus can cause strokes in patients with compromised immune systems

Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can, in rare cases, experience bleeding on the brain that causes a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists awarded NIH grant to develop potential HPV-based HIV vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists awarded NIH grant to develop potential HPV-based HIV vaccine

Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute have begun work on a nearly $3.4 million study funded by the National Institutes of Health over the next four years to create an attenuated, or weakened, virus that is a hybrid of the papilloma virus and the human immunodeficiency virus, with the potential to jumpstart a body's immune response to develop antibodies against both viruses. [More]
Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

In the largest genetic study to date of a challenging immunodeficiency disorder, scientists have identified a gene that may be a "missing link" between overactive and underactive immune activity. The gene candidate also plays a key role in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and allergies. [More]
Gene therapy reduces infectious complications in children, teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

Gene therapy reduces infectious complications in children, teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

In a small study that included seven children and teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare immunodeficiency disorder, use of gene therapy resulted in clinical improvement in infectious complications, severe eczema, and symptoms of autoimmunity, according to a study in the April 21 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health. [More]
Study calls for effective strategies to contain potential HDV epidemic in high-risk populations

Study calls for effective strategies to contain potential HDV epidemic in high-risk populations

Researchers from Taiwan determined that individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or those who inject illicit drugs have a higher risk of becoming infected with the hepatitis D virus (HDV) in that country. [More]
Nielsen BioSciences launches skin test that helps physicians manage Valley Fever infections

Nielsen BioSciences launches skin test that helps physicians manage Valley Fever infections

Nielsen BioSciences announced today the launch of SPHERUSOL (Coccidioides immitis Spherule-Derived Skin Test Antigen), a skin test that provides valuable data to physicians managing Valley Fever infections. SPHERUSOL has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the only skin test to detect an immune response to the fungus called Coccidioides, or "cocci," in patients with history of the disease. [More]
Prolong Pharmaceuticals' SANGUINATE granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for SCD treatment

Prolong Pharmaceuticals' SANGUINATE granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for SCD treatment

Prolong Pharmaceuticals, LLC, a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to developing products for the treatment of anemias, cancers and their debilitating comorbidities, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation for its flagship product SANGUINATE for the treatment of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). [More]
Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

A multi-year, ongoing study suggests that a new kind of gene therapy for hemophilia B could be safe and effective for human patients. Published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the research showed that a reprogrammed retrovirus could successfully transfer new factor IX (clotting) genes into animals with hemophilia B to dramatically decrease spontaneous bleeding. [More]
Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

For infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), something as simple as a common cold or ear infection can be fatal. Born with an incomplete immune system, kids who have SCID--also known as "bubble boy" or "bubble baby" disease--can't fight off even the mildest of germs. [More]
Salk scientists move one step closer to creating drug that could prevent HIV virus

Salk scientists move one step closer to creating drug that could prevent HIV virus

Imagine a single drug that could prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, treat patients who have already contracted HIV, and even remove all the dormant copies of the virus from those with the more advanced disease. It sounds like science fiction, but Salk scientists have gotten one step closer to creating such a drug by customizing a powerful defense system used by many bacteria and training this scissor-like machinery to recognize the HIV virus. [More]
Researchers study effects of pregnancy weight gain on childhood obesity risk among multi-ethnic youth

Researchers study effects of pregnancy weight gain on childhood obesity risk among multi-ethnic youth

Unhealthy weight gain in pregnancy has been linked with infant size and body composition but until now little was known about its long-term association with childhood obesity among low-income and multi-ethnic youth. [More]
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Human milk provides the best nutrition for most babies and breastfeeding provides the best nutrition for infants and very young children, according to an updated position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Scientists find gorilla origins in two human AIDS virus lineages

Scientists find gorilla origins in two human AIDS virus lineages

Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Montpellier, the University of Edinburgh, and others. [More]
Genomics researchers discover novel gene variants in childhood CVID

Genomics researchers discover novel gene variants in childhood CVID

Genomics researchers analyzing a rare, serious immunodeficiency disease in children have discovered links to a gene crucial to the body's defense against infections. The finding may represent an inviting target for drugs to treat common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). [More]
Scientists develop promising new HIV vaccine agent

Scientists develop promising new HIV vaccine agent

In a study that involved researchers from over a dozen institutions, the anti-HIV agent protected monkeys from every strain of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) for at least 34 weeks. [More]
New molecule shows promise in controlling HIV without using daily antiretroviral drugs

New molecule shows promise in controlling HIV without using daily antiretroviral drugs

Scientists have created a new molecule that shows promise for controlling HIV without daily antiretroviral drugs. The molecule foils a wider range of HIV strains in the laboratory than any known broadly neutralizing HIV antibody and is more powerful than some of the most potent of these antibodies. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new drug candidate against HIV

TSRI scientists develop new drug candidate against HIV

In a remarkable new advance against the virus that causes AIDS, scientists from the Jupiter, Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have announced the creation of a novel drug candidate that is so potent and universally effective, it might work as part of an unconventional vaccine. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement