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Immunodeficiency (or immune deficiency) is a state in which the immune system's ability to fight infectious disease is compromised or entirely absent.
HIV-infected adults with MDD more likely to experience heart attack, study shows

HIV-infected adults with MDD more likely to experience heart attack, study shows

Among more than 26,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, those with major depressive disorder (MDD) were more likely to experience a heart attack than those without MDD, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology. [More]
Added benefit of combination drug for HIV-infected patients not proven

Added benefit of combination drug for HIV-infected patients not proven

The drug combination emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide is approved in combination with other antiviral agents for the treatment of adults and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). [More]
New research examines biomechanics of galectin-3

New research examines biomechanics of galectin-3

A new study, published in Biochemistry this week, examines the biomechanics of sugar-seeking proteins. Specifically, it delves into galectin-3's interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and proteoglycans. [More]
Research could provide new insights into finding cure for chronic infections

Research could provide new insights into finding cure for chronic infections

New research has taken us a step closer to finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as other infections including the glandular fever virus, which is associated with the development of lymphoma. [More]
Researchers develop new hybrid method to study HIV protein involved in disease progression

Researchers develop new hybrid method to study HIV protein involved in disease progression

More than 36 million people worldwide, including 1.2 million in the U.S., are living with an HIV infection. Today's anti-retroviral cocktails block how HIV replicates, matures and gets into uninfected cells, but they can't eradicate the virus. [More]
People with filariasis show two to three-fold increased risk for HIV

People with filariasis show two to three-fold increased risk for HIV

Since the start of the HIV epidemic, there have been speculations as to why HIV and the immunodeficiency syndrome it causes have spread so much more in Africa than in other countries around the world. [More]
Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

A cardiac imaging study led by Hossein Bahrami, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, along with investigators from Johns Hopkins University and five other institutions, showed a correlation between higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

The ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells in the blood-a marker of immune system health and associated with mortality risk in the general population-is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected patients, according to a new study published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Scientists clarify mechanism of defective immune defense in G6PD patients

Scientists clarify mechanism of defective immune defense in G6PD patients

Favism is a common hereditary disease, affecting around 400 million people worldwide. It is caused by a lack of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). [More]
New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

No one knows exactly how it happened. It may have entered through a cut or bite wound, the blood of a chimpanzee seeping into an exposed fingertip or forearm or foot. [More]
Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to an undetectable level in most chronically infected people, it cannot eliminate reservoirs of HIV that persist in latently infected immune cells. [More]
Study results pave way to development of effective human vaccine against HIV

Study results pave way to development of effective human vaccine against HIV

A new scientific study conducted by a team of leading AIDS scientists reveal results that lead the way to the development of an effective human vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Researchers find distinct, non-identical differences among retroviruses

Researchers find distinct, non-identical differences among retroviruses

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, researchers in the report that most types of retroviruses have distinct, non-identical virus structures. [More]
Topical delivery of AVR drug combination can provide complete protection against HIV

Topical delivery of AVR drug combination can provide complete protection against HIV

Researchers are edging ever closer to discovering the perfect combination of drugs and drug delivery system that will stop the sexual transmission of HIV. [More]
Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients

New research published online today in Blood Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), challenges the generally held belief that individuals with HIV and aggressive lymphoma are not candidates for standard treatment. [More]
Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

By watching brightly glowing HIV-infected immune cells move within mice, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shown how infected immune cells latch onto an uninfected sister cell to directly transmit newly minted viral particles. [More]
Screening for syphilis in persons at risk for infection provides substantial benefit

Screening for syphilis in persons at risk for infection provides substantial benefit

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has found convincing evidence that screening for syphilis infection in asymptomatic, nonpregnant persons at increased risk for infection provides substantial benefit. The report appears in the June 7 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers find increased cancer incidence among patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Researchers find increased cancer incidence among patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders

Primary immunodeficiency disorders are a group of more than 300 single gene defects that affect the role of the immune system and prevent it from functioning properly. When Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers evaluated the overall and site-specific incidence of cancer among patients registered in the United States Immune Deficiency Network, they found increased cancer incidence rates among patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases — and, in particular, a significant increase in lymphoma cases. [More]
Improved research tool may open door to effective HIV vaccine designs

Improved research tool may open door to effective HIV vaccine designs

Vaccines are usually medicine's best defense against the world's deadliest microbes. However, HIV is so mutable that it has so far effectively evaded both the human immune system and scientists' attempts to make an effective vaccine to protect against it. [More]
Study provides insight to gene shuffling process

Study provides insight to gene shuffling process

Use of a new technique developed at the Babraham Institute has allowed researchers to take an in-depth look at the gene shuffling process that is responsible for our body's ability to recognise a vast range of foreign agents such as disease-causing microorganisms. [More]
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