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Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a person to contribute to conception. Infertility may also refer to the state of a woman who is unable to carry a pregnancy to full term.
New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome is the most common disorder of the male sex chromosomes, yet is rarely diagnosed in children. A new assessment tool is being developed by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to help pediatricians detect the physical traits of the syndrome. The tool could pave the way for early interventions that prevent and treat a range of physical, psychological, social, and cognitive impairments. [More]
Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to infertility treatment compared to opposite-sex couples

Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to infertility treatment compared to opposite-sex couples

Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to treatment for infertility than opposite-sex couples, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier launches open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announces the launch of open access journal Reproductive Biomedicine & Society Online. [More]
New genome-wide association study sheds light on the underlying biology of polycystic ovary syndrome

New genome-wide association study sheds light on the underlying biology of polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has been passed down in many families for generations -- causing reproductive and metabolic health problems for millions of women around the world. Yet, its cause remains unknown despite more than 80 years of research since the disorder was first described in 1935. [More]
Immunization programmes face a growing challenge from vaccine hesitancy

Immunization programmes face a growing challenge from vaccine hesitancy

People who delay or refuse vaccines for themselves or their children are presenting a growing challenge for countries seeking to close the immunization gap. Globally, one in 5 children still do not receive routine life-saving immunizations, and an estimated 1.5 million children still die each year of diseases that could be prevented by vaccines that already exist, according to the World Health Organization. [More]
Experts review role of vaccine hesitancy in limiting vaccine coverage, explore strategies to handle it

Experts review role of vaccine hesitancy in limiting vaccine coverage, explore strategies to handle it

People who delay or refuse vaccines for themselves or their children are presenting a growing challenge for countries seeking to close the immunization gap. Globally, 1 in 5 children still do not receive routine life-saving immunizations, and an estimated 1.5 million children still die each year of diseases that could be prevented by vaccines that already exist, according to WHO. [More]
Women who become mothers following fertility treatment face increased risk of depression

Women who become mothers following fertility treatment face increased risk of depression

Women giving birth after undergoing fertility treatment face an increased risk of depression compared to women ending up not having a child following fertility treatment, according to new research from the University of Copenhagen. According to the researchers, this has key implications for fertility treatment in future. [More]
Urologists report success in treating bladder issues, pelvic pain through neuromodulation technique

Urologists report success in treating bladder issues, pelvic pain through neuromodulation technique

Millions of people suffer from bladder dysfunction, including about 30 million in the U.S. One in seven women experience chronic pelvic pain. These are not only health issues, but quality of life issues. [More]
Using frozen eggs for in vitro fertilization linked to lower live birth rates

Using frozen eggs for in vitro fertilization linked to lower live birth rates

Compared to using fresh oocytes (eggs) for in vitro fertilization, use of cryopreserved (frozen) donor oocytes in 2013 was associated with lower live birth rates, according to a study in the August 11 issue of JAMA. [More]
Many reproductive-age women experience pelvic pain that goes untreated, study finds

Many reproductive-age women experience pelvic pain that goes untreated, study finds

A high proportion of reproductive-age women may be experiencing pelvic pain that goes untreated, according to a study by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City. [More]
Study: Unsuccessful fertility treatment not linked with increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression in women

Study: Unsuccessful fertility treatment not linked with increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression in women

An analysis of data on more than 41,000 Danish women who received assisted reproductive fertility treatment shows that unsuccessful treatment is not linked with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression compared with successful treatment. [More]
Prokarium receives funding to complete pre-clinical development of new Chlamydia vaccine

Prokarium receives funding to complete pre-clinical development of new Chlamydia vaccine

Prokarium Ltd, a biotechnology company developing transformational oral vaccines, today announced new funding from SynbiCITE, the UK’s Innovation and Knowledge Centre for Synthetic Biology. [More]
Research findings may provide new approach to treating male infertility

Research findings may provide new approach to treating male infertility

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore's (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine has demonstrated for the first time that hydrogen sulphide (H2S), when applied exogenously, could protect testicular germ cells, which are male reproductive cells, against heat-induced injury, which is one of the major causes of male infertility. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock now offers fully integrative medicine services to Central Texans

Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock now offers fully integrative medicine services to Central Texans

Scott & White Healthcare - Round Rock is now offering integrative medicine services to Central Texans that include massage therapy and acupuncture at two of its regional clinics: Scott & White Clinic - Avery Ranch and Baylor Scott & White Clinic - Round Rock South. [More]
Researchers develop sperm RNA diagnostic test to help determine best infertility treatment for couples

Researchers develop sperm RNA diagnostic test to help determine best infertility treatment for couples

A Wayne State University School of Medicine professor, in collaboration with researchers at CReAte Fertility Center, University of Toronto, Harvard University and Georgia Reagents University, has developed the first diagnostic test for sperm RNA based on next-generation sequencing. For couples with unexplained infertility, the test may help determine the best infertility treatment for couples having difficulty conceiving. [More]
IRB Barcelona scientists provide molecular details about Seckel Syndrome

IRB Barcelona scientists provide molecular details about Seckel Syndrome

Today in Nature Communications, scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) provide molecular details about Seckel Syndrome, a rare disease that causes microcephaly, or small brain, and growth delays. [More]
Sociologists to explore ideas, scientific research relating to sexuality at ASA's Annual Meeting

Sociologists to explore ideas, scientific research relating to sexuality at ASA's Annual Meeting

More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Chicago this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to sexuality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 110th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Sexualities in the Social World," shows the importance of research by sociologists in illuminating how social norms and social inequalities affect what sexual behavior is acceptable and who partners with whom. [More]

Research Instruments receives European patent for RI Witness system

Research Instruments Ltd, a company that develops cutting edge technology and biomedical equipment for use in the Assisted Reproduction (AR) sector, today announced the company has been awarded a European patent for their RI Witness system. It's the first to issue from a portfolio of patents filed for RI Witness. [More]
New research links mutations in TEX11 gene to some cases of male infertility

New research links mutations in TEX11 gene to some cases of male infertility

In the most severe form of male infertility, men do not make any measurable levels of sperm. This condition, called azoospermia, affects approximately 1 percent of the male population and is responsible for about a sixth of cases of male infertility. [More]
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