Infertility News and Research RSS Feed - Infertility News and Research

Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a person to contribute to conception. Infertility may also refer to the state of a woman who is unable to carry a pregnancy to full term.
Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure. [More]
Researchers reveal mechanism that determines direction of egg flow in fallopian tubes

Researchers reveal mechanism that determines direction of egg flow in fallopian tubes

Researchers in Japan have revealed the mechanism that determines the direction of the transportation of eggs in the fallopian tube. [More]
Research reveals critical role natural antioxidant selenium plays in woman's fertility

Research reveals critical role natural antioxidant selenium plays in woman's fertility

University of Adelaide research has for the first time shown how much of a critical role the natural antioxidant selenium plays at the earliest stages of a woman's fertility. [More]
Actamax reports positive results from first clinical study of novel sprayable adhesion barrier device

Actamax reports positive results from first clinical study of novel sprayable adhesion barrier device

Actamax Surgical Materials LLC, a DSM-DuPont Joint Venture focusing on the development and commercialization of resorbable, biocompatible surgical medical devices, today announced positive safety and efficacy results from the first clinical evaluation of its novel adhesion barrier device. [More]
Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Scientists from the RIKEN BioResource Center in Tsukuba, Japan, have discovered that a single mutation in the beta-catenin gene, which codes a protein known to be deeply involved in a number of developmental and homeostatic processes, can lead to infertility not through a disruption of the production of egg or sperm cells, but rather by leading to abnormalities in the morphology of the sexual organs, making natural reproduction impossible. [More]
Study sheds light on the mystery of biological clock that controls fertility in women

Study sheds light on the mystery of biological clock that controls fertility in women

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have identified the biological clock that governs female fertility. The discovery represents a major contribution to research aimed at finding medical approaches to treating infertility in women. [More]
New book offers advice on how to meet contraceptive needs of women with chronic medical problems

New book offers advice on how to meet contraceptive needs of women with chronic medical problems

Women with chronic medical conditions can be at higher risk for complications during pregnancy and therefore require specialized preconception and contraceptive care and counseling. However, many medical providers are hesitant to prescribe contraception to these women due to concerns about the safety of various contraceptives with co-existing medical disorders. [More]
University of Michigan to create center for reproductive health training in Africa

University of Michigan to create center for reproductive health training in Africa

With a $25 million grant from an anonymous donor, the University of Michigan will begin training doctors in Africa in reproductive health services not widely available to many women living in remote areas of the continent. [More]
Swedish woman gives birth to world's first womb-transplant baby

Swedish woman gives birth to world's first womb-transplant baby

In a ground-breaking research project at the University of Gothenburg, seven Swedish women have had embryos reintroduced after receiving wombs from living donors. Now the first transplanted woman has delivered a baby – a healthy and normally developed boy. The world-unique birth was acknowledged in The Lancet on 5 October. [More]
Ferring Pharmaceuticals to introduce new cranberry flavor option of PREPOPIK in 2015

Ferring Pharmaceuticals to introduce new cranberry flavor option of PREPOPIK in 2015

Colonoscopy is an important and widely used screening tool for colorectal cancer, but for many patients the bowel-preparation process is more uncomfortable than the procedure itself. To offer an alternative choice in bowel preparation, Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc. will introduce a new cranberry flavor option of PREPOPIK in January 2015. [More]
Chemotherapy, radiotherapy have no negative effect on unborn babies

Chemotherapy, radiotherapy have no negative effect on unborn babies

Children who are exposed to chemotherapy or radiotherapy while in the womb suffer no negative impacts on mental or cardiac development, international studies presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid have shown. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Reproductive cell division has mechanical safeguard against chromosome sorting errors

Reproductive cell division has mechanical safeguard against chromosome sorting errors

Reproductive cell division has evolved a simple, mechanical solution to avoid chromosome sorting errors, researchers report in the Sept. 11 Science Express. [More]
Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

An American public health expert will lecture Canadian doctors tomorrow about the hidden dangers of wireless radiation from their patients' cell phones, Wifi and other wireless consumer devices. [More]
Extraordinary Conceptions hosts free upcoming educational reception in Europe

Extraordinary Conceptions hosts free upcoming educational reception in Europe

Extraordinary Conceptions, a leading international egg donor and surrogacy agency based in San Diego County, will be hosting its free upcoming educational reception in Europe. [More]
Scientists identify how molecular motor essential for human development works

Scientists identify how molecular motor essential for human development works

Another mystery of the human body has been solved by scientists who have identified how a molecular motor essential for human development works. [More]
Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

William M. Sikov, a medical oncologist in the Breast Health Center and associate director for clinical research in the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, served as study chair and lead author for a recently-published major national study that could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionately affects younger women. [More]
Doctors, retail clinics adopt new business models

Doctors, retail clinics adopt new business models

The financial ground is changing for doctors in private practice and for patients seeking care. Being a doctor in private practice today is more complicated than it used to be, with growing financial pressures, more government regulation, greater oversight by insurers, rapid developments in medicine and pressure to keep up with technology. [More]
First Edition: September 2, 2014

First Edition: September 2, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including an analysis of care at small military hospitals and a look at the $8 billion in health law taxes that come due Sept. 30. [More]
Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Men and women differ in plenty of obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions. In the past, most research has focused on understanding how the genes that encode proteins act as sex determinants. [More]