Infertility Social Impact

In many cultures, inability to conceive bears a stigma. In closed social groups, a degree of rejection (or a sense of being rejected by the couple) may cause considerable anxiety and disappointment.

Some respond by actively avoiding the issue altogether; middle-class men are the most likely to respond in this way.

There are legal ramifications as well. Infertility has begun to gain more exposure to legal domains.

An estimated 4 million workers in the U.S. used the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in 2004 to care for a child, parent or spouse, or because of their own personal illness.

Many treatments for infertility, including diagnostic tests, surgery and therapy for depression, can qualify one for FMLA leave.

Further Reading


This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article on "Infertility" All material adapted used from Wikipedia is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Wikipedia® itself is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.

Last Updated: Feb 1, 2011

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