Insulin Resistance News and Research RSS Feed - Insulin Resistance News and Research

Insulin Resistance is a condition in which the body does not respond to insulin properly. This is most common in Type II diabetes or associated with obesity, ketoacidosis, infection, and certain rare conditions. Diminished effectiveness of insulin in lowering blood glucose levels requiring 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent hyperglycemia or ketosis.
Study links proteins involved in cell division to insulin signaling

Study links proteins involved in cell division to insulin signaling

Proteins that play key roles in the timing of cell division also moonlight in regulating blood sugar levels, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
Blood mannose levels could help predict type 2 diabetes risk

Blood mannose levels could help predict type 2 diabetes risk

Even if you are not overweight, your mannose levels may indicate whether you're at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) or insulin resistance (IR), a Swedish study shows. [More]
Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. [More]
SORLA protein makes fat cells oversensitive to insulin

SORLA protein makes fat cells oversensitive to insulin

SORLA is a protein that influences the balance of metabolic processes in adipose tissue, a particular form of fat. Too much of it makes fat cells overly sensitive to insulin, which leads them to break down less fat. SORLA was previously known for its protective role in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Mother's obesity can impair health of future generations

Mother's obesity can impair health of future generations

New research suggests that mothers who eat high-fat, high-sugar diets can predispose multiple generations to metabolic problems, even if their offspring consume healthy diets. [More]
Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

Brain's reward system in obese people operates differently in response to food and dopamine

As young people reach adulthood, their preferences for sweet foods typically decline. But for people with obesity, new research suggests that the drop-off may not be as steep and that the brain's reward system operates differently in obese people than in thinner people, which may play a role in this phenomenon. [More]
Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

In a large prospective study published online in the British Journal of Cancer, researchers looked at the association between nut consumption and prostate cancer risk and mortality among 47,299 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. [More]
MPC outperforms PID in automated insulin delivery for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

MPC outperforms PID in automated insulin delivery for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

The so-called artificial pancreas — an automated insulin delivery system for people with type 1 diabetes mellitus — uses an advanced control algorithm to regulate how much insulin a pump should deliver and when. Regulating glucose is challenging because levels respond to a wide-array of variables, including food, physical activity, sleep, stress, hormones, metabolism and more. [More]
Epigenomic alterations play key role in triggering obesity-induced diabetes

Epigenomic alterations play key role in triggering obesity-induced diabetes

Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes, yet not all obese humans develop the disease. In a new study, researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and from the Institute of Health and Medical Research in France have identified epigenomic alterations that are associated with inflammation and type 2 diabetes [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
TAK1 deficit protects mice from obesity

TAK1 deficit protects mice from obesity

Obesity and subsequent complications are increasing in frequency worldwide. The accumulation of adipose tissue is associated with increased inflammation, and it has been proposed that modification of proinflammatory responses could alter adipose tissue composition. [More]
Exposure to bright light may influence metabolism

Exposure to bright light may influence metabolism

Exposure to bright light could affect your metabolism, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Combination of two compounds found in red grapes, oranges could treat diseases

Combination of two compounds found in red grapes, oranges could treat diseases

A combination of two compounds found in red grapes and oranges could be used to improve the health of people with diabetes, and reduce cases of obesity and heart disease. [More]

Oral regimens could offer simple solution for severe hyperglycaemia

Study findings indicate that oral treatments could offer a simpler alternative to upfront insulin for patients who have severe hyperglycaemia at the time of diagnosis with Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Videogame addiction may impact sleep habits, obesity and cardio-metabolic health among children and teens

Videogame addiction may impact sleep habits, obesity and cardio-metabolic health among children and teens

Some children and youth with high videogame addiction tendencies may be at risk of sleep deprivation and disorders associated with obesity and poor cardio-metabolic health, Hamilton researchers have found. [More]
Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Dr. Brian K. Stansfield, neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Georgia and a 2004 graduate of the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, has received the 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award from the Southern Society for Pediatric Research. [More]
Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement