Insulin Resistance News and Research RSS Feed - Insulin Resistance News and Research

Insulin Resistance is a condition in which the body does not respond to insulin properly. This is most common in Type II diabetes or associated with obesity, ketoacidosis, infection, and certain rare conditions. Diminished effectiveness of insulin in lowering blood glucose levels requiring 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent hyperglycemia or ketosis.
Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much remains unknown about how the benefits arise, and what to expect in different people who exercise to improve their health. To gain a more precise understanding of how exercise improves health and whom it helps most, researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. [More]
Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

In a study published this week in Nutrition Journal*, researchers compared risk factors for heart disease and metabolic syndrome of tree nut consumers versus those who did not consume tree nuts. Tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) consumption was associated with lower body mass index (p=0.004), systolic blood pressure (p=0.001), insulin resistance (p=0.043) and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (good cholesterol) (p=0.022). [More]
Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with a genetic predisposition to high blood pressure have a lower risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Obesity is caused by numerous and complex factors, some of which are as yet unsuspected. Scientists from the CNRS, INSERM, UPMC and Université Paris Descartes, working with research clinicians from Paris Public Hospitals (AP-HP) have now shown that severe obesity is accompanied by inflammation of the small intestine and enhanced immune response in that region. [More]
WSU research provides new strategies for prevention, treatment of obesity

WSU research provides new strategies for prevention, treatment of obesity

Washington State University scientists have shown that berries, grapes and other fruits convert excess white fat into calorie-burning "beige" fat, providing new strategies for the prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
IDIBELL researchers identify potential treatment for type 2 diabetes

IDIBELL researchers identify potential treatment for type 2 diabetes

Currently, there are more than 350 million type 2 diabetics and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) by 2030 it will be the 7th leading cause of death worldwide. [More]
Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids may affect memory

Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids may affect memory

Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids (dTFA), commonly used in processed foods to improve taste, texture and durability, has been linked to worsened memory function in men 45 years old and younger, according to a University of California, San Diego School of Medicine study published online on June 17 in PLOS ONE. [More]
High fructose consumption can lead to uncontrolled growth of cardiomyocytes, heart attack

High fructose consumption can lead to uncontrolled growth of cardiomyocytes, heart attack

'Walk through any supermarket and take a look at the labels on food products, and you'll see that many of them contain fructose, often in the form of sucrose (table sugar)' -- that's how Wilhelm Krek, professor for cell biology at ETH Zurich's Institute for Molecular Health Sciences, summarises the problem with today's nutrition. [More]
Study reveals new information about role of abdominal fat in teens with CAH

Study reveals new information about role of abdominal fat in teens with CAH

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have demonstrated that adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have significantly increased amounts of abdominal fat tissue, placing them at greater risk for harmful conditions linked to obesity, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). [More]
Combining lifestyle modification with metformin could help women manage polycystic ovary syndrome

Combining lifestyle modification with metformin could help women manage polycystic ovary syndrome

A systematic review publishing today in the journal Human Reproduction Update has found that women who suffer from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) could manage some of the symptoms by combining a change in lifestyle with taking the drug metformin. [More]
Understanding link between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes

Understanding link between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes

Nearly 50 percent of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) develop pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes before the age of 40, but the reasons for the correlation was unclear. In a new study in the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers report that inflammation is the cause for the increased diabetes risk in women with PCOS. [More]
Chronic exposure to bacteria may lead to development of Type 2 diabetes

Chronic exposure to bacteria may lead to development of Type 2 diabetes

Bacteria and viruses have an obvious role in causing infectious diseases, but microbes have also been identified as the surprising cause of other illnesses, including cervical cancer (Human papilloma virus) and stomach ulcers (H. pylori bacteria). [More]
Diabetes and poor diet can trigger Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, warns BUAP researcher

Diabetes and poor diet can trigger Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, warns BUAP researcher

For several years a researcher was dedicated to feed rodents in his laboratory with a high caloric content and glucose concentrations, which caused them diabetes, and by scientifically assessing what occurred in animals he observed that "diabetes and poor diet is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's or Parkinson's," warns Samuel Treviño Mora from the Meritorious University of Puebla in Mexico. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $2.2 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to advance an innovative approach to the treatment of obesity, a serious health problem that affects more than one-third of all Americans. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
Risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for males than females

Risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for males than females

Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice at the University of Michigan Medical School suggests. [More]
Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Alternative splicing of obesity and type 2 diabetes related genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Obesity leads to changes in the splicing pattern of metabolically relevant genes such as TCF7L2 and INSR, resulting in impaired insulin action. [More]
Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis. [More]
Obese people at greater risk of developing cancer

Obese people at greater risk of developing cancer

Cancer is more likely to develop in people who are very overweight (obese), because surplus body fat interferes with various hormone cycles and with glucose and fat metabolism. On the occasion of European Obesity Day this coming Saturday (16 May), metabolic expert Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, Comprehensive Cancer Center at MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital, draws attention to the fact that, even in Austria, more and more people are suffering from obesity. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
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