Insulin Resistance News and Research RSS Feed - Insulin Resistance News and Research

Insulin Resistance is a condition in which the body does not respond to insulin properly. This is most common in Type II diabetes or associated with obesity, ketoacidosis, infection, and certain rare conditions. Diminished effectiveness of insulin in lowering blood glucose levels requiring 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent hyperglycemia or ketosis.
Diabetes and poor diet can trigger Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, warns BUAP researcher

Diabetes and poor diet can trigger Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, warns BUAP researcher

For several years a researcher was dedicated to feed rodents in his laboratory with a high caloric content and glucose concentrations, which caused them diabetes, and by scientifically assessing what occurred in animals he observed that "diabetes and poor diet is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's or Parkinson's," warns Samuel Treviño Mora from the Meritorious University of Puebla in Mexico. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $2.2 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to advance an innovative approach to the treatment of obesity, a serious health problem that affects more than one-third of all Americans. [More]
Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Research findings cast new light on biological process that can lead to diabetes

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. [More]
Risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for males than females

Risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for males than females

Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice at the University of Michigan Medical School suggests. [More]
Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Alternative splicing of obesity and type 2 diabetes related genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Obesity leads to changes in the splicing pattern of metabolically relevant genes such as TCF7L2 and INSR, resulting in impaired insulin action. [More]
Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis. [More]
Obese people at greater risk of developing cancer

Obese people at greater risk of developing cancer

Cancer is more likely to develop in people who are very overweight (obese), because surplus body fat interferes with various hormone cycles and with glucose and fat metabolism. On the occasion of European Obesity Day this coming Saturday (16 May), metabolic expert Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, Comprehensive Cancer Center at MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital, draws attention to the fact that, even in Austria, more and more people are suffering from obesity. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research from Sweden published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that serious life events (SLEs) in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce/separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family, can triple the risk of subsequently developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
Remogliflozin etabonate: A potential treatment option for management of NASH and NAFLD

Remogliflozin etabonate: A potential treatment option for management of NASH and NAFLD

Data presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 demonstrates that remogliflozin etabonate, an investigational drug in type 2 diabetes, is a potential treatment option for the management of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
New class of drugs targeting blood glucose level could benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes

New class of drugs targeting blood glucose level could benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes

Individuals with type 2 diabetes, who are resistant to insulin, have an excess blood glucose level, which they are now trying to reduce using a new class of diabetes drugs known as the gliflozins. [More]
High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

You might think that you can get away with eating fatty foods for a few days without it making any significant changes to your body. Think again. After just five days of eating a high-fat diet, the way in which the body's muscle processes nutrients changes, which could lead to long-term problems such as weight gain, obesity, and other health issues, a new study has found. [More]
Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

A commonly-used drug to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease, has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in obese mice, potentially identifying the gut immune system as a new and effective target in treating diabetes in humans. [More]
FGF21 protein can boost regenerative effects of human PPARα

FGF21 protein can boost regenerative effects of human PPARα

Researchers at UC Davis have illuminated an important distinction between mice and humans: how human livers heal. The difference centers on a protein called PPARα, which activates liver regeneration. Normally, mouse PPARα is far more active and efficient than the human form, allowing mice to quickly regenerate damaged livers. [More]
Anti-diabetic medication activates brain sensors, promotes weight gain

Anti-diabetic medication activates brain sensors, promotes weight gain

Medication used to treat patients with type II diabetes activates sensors on brain cells that increase hunger, causing people taking this drug to gain more body fat, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Oregon Health and Science University, Georgia Regents University and Charlie Norwood Veterans Administration Medical Center. [More]
GFT505 demonstrates dose-dependent efficacy on primary endpoint in phase 2 NASH trial

GFT505 demonstrates dose-dependent efficacy on primary endpoint in phase 2 NASH trial

GENFIT, today announces topline results of the phase 2 GOLDEN-505 trial in NASH. Due to the unexpected rate of resolution of NASH in patients randomized to placebo who had early NASH (NAS of 3, placebo response rate>57%), along with the high number of sites for a limited sample size, the study as initially designed did not enable the trial to meet directly the primary endpoint. [More]
Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. A cardiometabolic risk score was used to evaluate cardiometabolic risk in different age groups. [More]
Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Scientists have known for some time that people who carry a lot of weight around their bellies are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease than those who have bigger hips and thighs. [More]
Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

The concept was simple: If two compounds each individually show promise in preventing colon cancer, surely it's worth trying the two together to see if even greater impact is possible. [More]
Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

Vitamin D plays major role in preventing diabetes and atherosclerosis

In recent years, a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease, two illnesses that commonly occur together and are the most common cause of illness and death in Western countries. Both disorders are rooted in chronic inflammation, which leads to insulin resistance and the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. [More]
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