Insulin Resistance News and Research RSS Feed - Insulin Resistance News and Research

Insulin Resistance is a condition in which the body does not respond to insulin properly. This is most common in Type II diabetes or associated with obesity, ketoacidosis, infection, and certain rare conditions. Diminished effectiveness of insulin in lowering blood glucose levels requiring 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent hyperglycemia or ketosis.
People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes are more prone to anxiety and depression than those with other chronic diseases that require similar levels of management. The reasons for this aren't well understood, but Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have discovered one potential explanation. [More]
Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood, accompanied by temporary pre-diabetic conditions in healthy young men, according to new research published online February 19, 2015, in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. [More]
Scientists awarded Agri-Tech Catalyst funding to develop new varieties of pearl millet to tackle diabetes

Scientists awarded Agri-Tech Catalyst funding to develop new varieties of pearl millet to tackle diabetes

Scientists at Aberystwyth University's IBERS (Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences) have been awarded £250,000 of Agri-Tech Catalyst funding for an 18 month project to develop new varieties of pearl millet. [More]
Study: Infant gut microbiota associated with healthy weight gain

Study: Infant gut microbiota associated with healthy weight gain

Researchers in Singapore and UK as part of the EpiGen consortium worked together with scientists at the Nestlé Research Center, Switzerland, on a new study on the bacterial makeup of the gut (gut microbiota) of infants in Singapore. Their study reveals that the rate of bacterial colonisation of the gut is influenced by external factors such as the method of delivery and duration of gestation. [More]
Researchers to highlight impact of maternal glycemia on childhood obesity at The Pregnancy Meeting

Researchers to highlight impact of maternal glycemia on childhood obesity at The Pregnancy Meeting

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Diego, researchers will report on the impact of maternal glycemia on childhood obesity and metabolic dysfunction. [More]
Study reveals how the brain can use fatty acids to control liver lipid production

Study reveals how the brain can use fatty acids to control liver lipid production

Ways of keeping the heart healthy has widened, with the discovery that the brain can help fight off hardening of the arteries. [More]
Using antioxidant to reverse brain inflammation improves obesity, diabetes symptoms

Using antioxidant to reverse brain inflammation improves obesity, diabetes symptoms

Using an antioxidant to reverse inflammation in the brain caused by a high-fat diet greatly improves symptoms related to obesity and type II diabetes, a new study from New Zealand's University of Otago suggests. [More]
Adropin hormone offers a promising treatment option for type 2 diabetes

Adropin hormone offers a promising treatment option for type 2 diabetes

In a study published in Molecular Metabolism, a SLU researcher has found that adropin, a hormone that regulates whether the body burns fat or sugar during feeding and fasting cycles, can improve insulin action in obese, diabetic mice, suggesting that it may work as a therapy for type 2 diabetes. [More]
Preventing obesity-related inflammation may reverse type 2 diabetes

Preventing obesity-related inflammation may reverse type 2 diabetes

Preventing inflammation in obese fat tissue may hold the key to preventing or even reversing type 2 diabetes, new research has found. [More]
Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Low doses of metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, and a gene inhibitor known as BI2536 can successfully halt the growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors, a Purdue University study finds. [More]
Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Saskatoon, Canada, led by Dr. Joseph Fomusi Ndisang have determined that upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin improves pericardial adipocyte morphology and function. [More]
Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

Vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities cause dementia in older people

A growing body of research suggests that the most common cause of dementia in older people is a mix of vascular and Alzheimer's-related brain abnormalities, and that approximately half of people who die with Alzheimer's also have evidence of strokes in their brains. Furthermore, when strokes and hallmark Alzheimer's plaques and tangles are combined, it increases a person's likelihood of experiencing dementia. [More]
U-M researchers identify how amlexanox drug improves metabolism of sugar

U-M researchers identify how amlexanox drug improves metabolism of sugar

Researchers at the University of Michigan have identified how a promising drug in clinical trials for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders improves the metabolism of sugar by generating a new signal between fat cells and the liver. [More]
Pellino3 protein may prevent obesity-driven diabetes, find Maynooth University scientists

Pellino3 protein may prevent obesity-driven diabetes, find Maynooth University scientists

Maynooth University scientists have identified a protein in the body that may have the potential to prevent the development of obesity-driven diabetes. [More]
Stress can trigger diabetes, depression and other autoimmune diseases

Stress can trigger diabetes, depression and other autoimmune diseases

Stress is an ability of humans to fight or flee when faced with problems affecting the individual. By changes in the organism, adaptation to various physical conditions is achieved: burns, bruises, bleeding or psychosocial traumas. [More]
Fat cells below skin help protect from bacteria, say researchers

Fat cells below skin help protect from bacteria, say researchers

When it comes to skin infections, a healthy and robust immune response may depend greatly upon what lies beneath. In a new paper published in the January 2, 2015 issue of Science, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report the surprising discovery that fat cells below the skin help protect us from bacteria. [More]
Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Nutrition experts are continually debating the nutritional value of carbohydrate-containing foods and whether some are healthier than others. High carbohydrate foods are classified by how much they increase blood sugar; known as glycemic index. In new findings led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, researchers looked at glycemic index' effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and found that low glycemic diets did not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors. [More]
New study finds that immune cells in the brain may contribute to obesity

New study finds that immune cells in the brain may contribute to obesity

Immune cells perform a previously unsuspected role in the brain that may contribute to obesity, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]