Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Leukemia News and Research

Leukemia (Leukaemia) is a cancer of the blood cells. It is the most common type of blood cancer and affects 10 times as many adults as children. Most people diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. No one knows why some people develop leukemia and others do not. However, scientists have identified some risk factors for the disease. Most people who have known risk factors do not get leukemia, while many who do get the disease have none of these risk factors. During the early stages of leukemia, there may be no symptoms. Many of the symptoms of leukemia don't become apparent until a large number of normal blood cells are crowded out by leukemia cells.
SMU virologist receives NCI grant to advance research into how certain viruses cause cancers

SMU virologist receives NCI grant to advance research into how certain viruses cause cancers

SMU virologist and cancer researcher Robert L. Harrod has been awarded a $436,500 grant from the National Cancer Institute to further his lab's research into how certain viruses cause cancers in humans. [More]
ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

The American Society of Hematology has partnered with several organizations on independent educational programming designed to help address knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Researchers uncover possible targeted therapy for new, high-risk subtype of ALL

Researchers uncover possible targeted therapy for new, high-risk subtype of ALL

An international research team led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators has uncovered details of a new, high-risk subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as well as a possible targeted therapy. [More]
Study finds lack of improvement in health status of childhood cancer survivors

Study finds lack of improvement in health status of childhood cancer survivors

Long-term survivors of childhood cancer live longer thanks to improvements to cancer treatments, but a new study looking at three decades of therapy suggests patients do not report better health status. [More]
FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application for the expanded use of ENBREL (etanercept), making it the first and only systemic therapy to treat pediatric patients (ages 4-17) with chronic moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
WSU researcher finds a way to reduce development of cancer cells

WSU researcher finds a way to reduce development of cancer cells

A Washington State University researcher has developed a way to reduce the development of cancer cells that are an infrequent but dangerous byproduct of gene therapy. [More]
Problems with nuclear membrane play role in leukemia, heart disease and aging disorders

Problems with nuclear membrane play role in leukemia, heart disease and aging disorders

We put things into a container to keep them organized and safe. In cells, the nucleus has a similar role: keeping DNA protected and intact within an enveloping membrane. [More]
Scientists discover novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia

Scientists discover novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered a novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that normally requires prompt and aggressive treatment. [More]
Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center today announced the official opening of a first-of-its-kind clinic dedicated to providing innovative immunotherapies for cancer patients in clinical trials. [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
Blocking critical molecule with therapeutic antibody could effectively reduce leukemia burden

Blocking critical molecule with therapeutic antibody could effectively reduce leukemia burden

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer known for drug resistance and relapse. In an effort to uncover new treatment strategies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that a cell surface molecule known as CD98 promotes AML. [More]
Combination of two drugs could be effective strategy to target T-cell lymphocytic leukemia

Combination of two drugs could be effective strategy to target T-cell lymphocytic leukemia

Researchers have determined that two Phase 1 drugs (CX-4945 and JQ1) can work together to efficiently kill T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells while having minimal impact on normal blood cells. [More]
Novel lipid-based therapeutic shows promise for combating drug resistance in AML

Novel lipid-based therapeutic shows promise for combating drug resistance in AML

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina Hollings Cancer Center have discovered a mechanism that confers resistance to drugs used to treat certain types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
New oncogene may contribute to high incidence of prostate cancer among African American men

New oncogene may contribute to high incidence of prostate cancer among African American men

A team of scientists has identified MNX1 as a new oncogene - a gene than can cause cancer - that is more active in African American prostate cancer than in European American prostate cancer. [More]
Yale researchers develop new mouse model to understand multiple myeloma

Yale researchers develop new mouse model to understand multiple myeloma

Understanding how multiple myeloma develops and responds to therapies may be easier using a new mouse model developed at Yale University School of Medicine. [More]
Beckman Coulter Life Sciences introduces ClearLLab LS Lymphoid Screen Reagent for faster L&L analysis

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences introduces ClearLLab LS Lymphoid Screen Reagent for faster L&L analysis

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences further demonstrates its expertise in clinical flow cytometry with the launch of ClearLLab LS Lymphoid Screen Reagent, Europe’s first CE-marked 10-colour, 12 antibody reagent combination for leukaemia and lymphoma analysis. [More]
Cancers that cause huge impact on healthy years of life linked to smoking and alcohol

Cancers that cause huge impact on healthy years of life linked to smoking and alcohol

A new study finds eleven of the 15 cancers with the most impact on healthy years of life lost in the United States are closely-associated with two preventable risk factors: smoking and alcohol. [More]
Long-term clinical data, experience supports effectiveness of PRRT for treating neuroendocrine tumors

Long-term clinical data, experience supports effectiveness of PRRT for treating neuroendocrine tumors

More than ten years of published clinical data and personal experience using PRRT-based targeted therapy of neuroendocrine tumors supports the effectiveness of this novel treatment approach and the ability to minimize and manage potential toxic side effects. [More]
Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers receive $2.4 million grant from NIH NHLBI

Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers receive $2.4 million grant from NIH NHLBI

The National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute has awarded a $2.4 million grant over four years to Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers Jaroslaw Maciejewski, M.D., and Richard Padgett, Ph.D., to test the hypothesis that alterations in the pattern of splicing of target genes play a major role in the establishment or progression of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). [More]
Swedish researchers develop new, low-cost method to examine individual leukemia cells

Swedish researchers develop new, low-cost method to examine individual leukemia cells

Leukemia is a disease in which each cell can exhibit different genetic traits, and now Swedish researchers have found a cheap way to examine the individual cells. Reported in Nature Communications, the breakthrough could transform leukemia treatment. [More]
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