Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Leukemia News and Research

Leukemia (Leukaemia) is a cancer of the blood cells. It is the most common type of blood cancer and affects 10 times as many adults as children. Most people diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. No one knows why some people develop leukemia and others do not. However, scientists have identified some risk factors for the disease. Most people who have known risk factors do not get leukemia, while many who do get the disease have none of these risk factors. During the early stages of leukemia, there may be no symptoms. Many of the symptoms of leukemia don't become apparent until a large number of normal blood cells are crowded out by leukemia cells.
Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

For infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), something as simple as a common cold or ear infection can be fatal. Born with an incomplete immune system, kids who have SCID--also known as "bubble boy" or "bubble baby" disease--can't fight off even the mildest of germs. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
Melbourne researchers develop new genome editing technology to kill blood cancer cells

Melbourne researchers develop new genome editing technology to kill blood cancer cells

Melbourne researchers have developed a new genome editing technology that can target and kill blood cancer cells with high accuracy. [More]
Oxis Biotech executes licensing agreement with MCIT for development of antibody-drug conjugates

Oxis Biotech executes licensing agreement with MCIT for development of antibody-drug conjugates

Oxis Biotech, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Oxis International, Inc., announced today the execution of a definitive licensing and development agreement with MultiCell Immunotherapeutics, Inc. concerning the development of certain antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). [More]
Recruitment completed for Phase III PROUD-PV trial of P1101 for treatment of polycythemia vera

Recruitment completed for Phase III PROUD-PV trial of P1101 for treatment of polycythemia vera

PharmaEssentia (Taipei, Taiwan) and AOP Orphan (Vienna, Austria) announce the completion of recruitment for the Phase III trial PROUD-PV to support global marketing of P1101 (Ropeginterferon alfa-2b), a novel, long-acting, mono-pegylated interferon for the first line treatment of polycythemia vera. [More]
Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

Pacritinib for myelofibrosis meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced positive top-line results for the primary endpoint from PERSIST-1, the randomized, controlled Phase 3 registration clinical trial examining pacritinib, a next generation oral JAK2/FLT3 multikinase inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. [More]
Rare, aggressive subtype of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia has surprisingly few mutations

Rare, aggressive subtype of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia has surprisingly few mutations

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital--Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project reports that a highly aggressive form of leukemia in infants has surprisingly few mutations beyond the chromosomal rearrangement that affects the MLL gene. The findings suggest that targeting the alteration is likely the key to improved survival. [More]
FDA approves Astellas' CRESEMBA for treatment of invasive aspergillosis, invasive mucormycosis

FDA approves Astellas' CRESEMBA for treatment of invasive aspergillosis, invasive mucormycosis

Astellas today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its New Drug Application (NDA) for the use of CRESEMBA (isavuconazonium sulfate), the prodrug for isavuconazole, for patients 18 years of age and older in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis (also known as zygomycosis). [More]
Finding may help advance experimental approach to improving public health

Finding may help advance experimental approach to improving public health

Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate how cells function, a finding that might help advance an experimental approach to improving public health: DNA vaccines, which could be more efficient, less expensive and easier to store than traditional vaccines. [More]
CLL patients discontinue ibrutinib drug due to disease progression during clinical trials

CLL patients discontinue ibrutinib drug due to disease progression during clinical trials

About 10 percent of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) discontinued therapy with the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor drug ibrutinib because of disease progression during clinical trials, according to a study published online in JAMA Oncology. [More]
Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted orphan drug designation for alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had a certain gene variant experienced a higher incidence and severity of peripheral neuropathy after receiving treatment with the cancer drug vincristine, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers have identified the first genetic variation that is associated with increased risk and severity of peripheral neuropathy following treatment with a widely used anti-cancer drug. Investigators also found evidence of how it may be possible to protect young leukemia patients without jeopardizing cures. [More]
New NCCN Guidelines for treating Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

New NCCN Guidelines for treating Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

According to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), the treatment approach to ALL is one of the most complex and intensive programs in cancer therapy. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Evolution of two protein kinases may hold key to unlocking highly specific cancer drugs

Evolution of two protein kinases may hold key to unlocking highly specific cancer drugs

This is the story of Abl and Src -- two nearly identical protein kinases whose evolution may hold the key to unlocking new, highly specific cancer drugs. [More]
Georgia State signs license agreement with Cisen to develop compounds for treating cancer

Georgia State signs license agreement with Cisen to develop compounds for treating cancer

Georgia State University has signed a license agreement with Cisen Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., a comprehensive pharmaceutical enterprise in China, to develop cancer-fighting compounds designed by Georgia State researcher Dr. Binghe Wang, in collaboration with Professor Muxiang Zhou of Emory University, a cancer biologist. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
INRS researchers explore cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect AgNP particles

INRS researchers explore cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect AgNP particles

Whereas resistance to antibiotics complicates certain treatments, antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are gaining popularity for medical use. These particles are toxic for certain bacteria, but what about for humans? Researchers at INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre have taken a step toward understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect these particles. [More]
Lupus Research Institute announces this year's Novel Research Grants

Lupus Research Institute announces this year's Novel Research Grants

As the Lupus Research Institute celebrates its 15th anniversary, the engine of innovation moves forward at accelerated speed with the announcement of this year's Novel Research Grants bringing new talent from a wide diversity of specialties. Each project lives up to the strictest definition of novel – wholly original, never-been-done-before. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement