Lipids News and Research RSS Feed - Lipids News and Research

Lipids are a broad group of naturally-occurring molecules which includes fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, phospholipids, and others. The main biological functions of lipids include energy storage, as structural components of cell membranes, and as important signaling molecules.
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found. [More]
Sanofi, Regeneron present alirocumab Phase 3 trial results at ESC Congress 2014

Sanofi, Regeneron present alirocumab Phase 3 trial results at ESC Congress 2014

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that details from four pivotal trials in the alirocumab ODYSSEY clinical program will be presented on Sunday, August 31, during a Hot Line session at ESC Congress 2014 in Barcelona, Spain, the world's largest cardiology meeting. [More]
Dietary compliance can be evaluated from blood sample

Dietary compliance can be evaluated from blood sample

New results from the Nordic SYSDIET study show that it's possible to assess dietary compliance from a blood sample. This is especially useful in controlled dietary intervention studies investigating the health benefits of specific diets. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

It's time to question the common belief that patients receiving intensive blood pressure treatment are prone to falling and breaking bones. A comprehensive study in people ages 40 to 79 with diabetes, led by Karen Margolis, MD, of HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in the US, found no evidence supporting this belief. [More]
Diet reduces inflammatory markers in ‘real world’ Type 2 diabetes

Diet reduces inflammatory markers in ‘real world’ Type 2 diabetes

Encouraging patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes to diet or to diet and increase their physical activity reduces markers of inflammation and their cardiovascular risk compared with usual care, real-world study findings show. [More]
Research: Oxidative stress predicts hip fracture in postmenopausal women

Research: Oxidative stress predicts hip fracture in postmenopausal women

Oxidative stress is a significant predictor for hip fracture in postmenopausal women, according to new research led by University of Cincinnati (UC) epidemiologists. [More]
Almonds can help reduce inflammation in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Almonds can help reduce inflammation in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Evidence continues to mount supporting the role of almonds and other tree nuts as part of an overall dietary pattern that is beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes. Three new studies suggest a relationship between regular consumption of tree nuts, such as almonds, and improvement in various markers of health in type 2 diabetes. [More]
Researchers create synthetic ion transporter that triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

Researchers create synthetic ion transporter that triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

Researchers from the University of Southampton are part of an international team that has helped to create a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by carrying sodium and chloride ions into the cells. [More]
Researchers create synthetic molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct

Researchers create synthetic molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. [More]
New probe can be used in 3 unique ways to detect cancer

New probe can be used in 3 unique ways to detect cancer

As thousands of vacationers hit the beach this summer, many of them will expose their unprotected bare limbs to direct UV sunlight, potentially putting them at risk of skin cancer later in life. [More]
New techniques offer insight into cell-by-cell makeup of organisms

New techniques offer insight into cell-by-cell makeup of organisms

In general, our knowledge of biology-and much of science in general-is limited by our ability to actually see things. Researchers who study developmental problems and disease, in particular, are often limited by their inability to look inside an organism to figure out exactly what went wrong and when. [More]

Marine pest may pave way for novel anti-fouling coatings for maritime industry, biomedicine

A team of biologists, led by Clemson University associate professor Andrew S. Mount, performed cutting-edge research on a marine pest that will pave the way for novel anti-fouling paint for ships and boats and also improve bio-adhesives for medical and industrial applications. [More]
Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

A new study involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and other institutions says patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes should eat a diet low in carbohydrates. [More]
Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

When a foreign material like a medical device or surgical implant is put inside the human body, the body always responds. According to Northwestern University's Guillermo Ameer, most of the time, that response can be negative and affect the device's function. [More]
Tiny gold particles can make cell membranes deliver drugs directly to target cells

Tiny gold particles can make cell membranes deliver drugs directly to target cells

A special class of tiny gold particles can easily slip through cell membranes, making them good candidates to deliver drugs directly to target cells. [More]
Elevated ASM activity linked to Alzheimer's disease

Elevated ASM activity linked to Alzheimer's disease

Unclogging the body's protein disposal system may improve memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study from scientists at Kyungpook National University in Korea published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
A personalized approach for patients with ccRCC-related mutations

A personalized approach for patients with ccRCC-related mutations

In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth. [More]