Lipids News and Research RSS Feed - Lipids News and Research

Lipids are a broad group of naturally-occurring molecules which includes fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, phospholipids, and others. The main biological functions of lipids include energy storage, as structural components of cell membranes, and as important signaling molecules.
Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Associated with various types of cancer such as skin and liver, the intake of arsenic it is also linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. According to a long-term research conducted by experts from the Center for Research and Advanced Studies it was determined that this metalloid inhibits enzymes associated with antioxidant protection. [More]
BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

BIDMC scientists uncover new class of molecules that protects against diabetes

Scientists at the Salk Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston have discovered a new class of molecules—produced in human and mouse fat—that protects against diabetes. [More]
Discovery offers promising new avenue for prevention, treatment of type 2 diabetes

Discovery offers promising new avenue for prevention, treatment of type 2 diabetes

The surprising discovery of a previously unidentified class of lipid molecules that enhance insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control offers a promising new avenue for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. [More]
Benefits of low-carbohydrate diet for patients with type 2 diabetes

Benefits of low-carbohydrate diet for patients with type 2 diabetes

Low-carbohydrate diet has a good effect not only on blood glucose, but also on physical functions, bodily pain and general health, according to a diet study including patients with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Lpath closes $12.5 million registered direct offering

Lpath closes $12.5 million registered direct offering

Lpath, Inc., the industry leader in bioactive lipid-targeted therapeutics, announced today the closing of its previously announced $12.5 million registered direct offering. [More]
New findings could pave way for treating autoimmune diseases

New findings could pave way for treating autoimmune diseases

Scientists from A*STAR's Bioprocessing Technology Institute (BTI) have established a clearer relationship between two cells which serve our body's natural defence mechanisms against diseases and infections. [More]
Photoacoustics could become alternative to mammography or sonogram for breast cancer detection

Photoacoustics could become alternative to mammography or sonogram for breast cancer detection

One of the lines of research of OILTEBIA, a European science project coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, is a method to detect breast cancer based on photoacoustics and which could become an alternative to mammography or sonogram. [More]
APOC3 gene variant dramatically reduces triglyceride levels in the blood

APOC3 gene variant dramatically reduces triglyceride levels in the blood

Research using data collected from around 4,000 healthy people in the UK has enabled scientists to identify a rare genetic variant that dramatically reduces levels of certain types of lipids in the blood. The study is the first to emerge from the UK10K Project's cohort of samples from the general public and demonstrates the power of whole genome sequencing at scale. [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found. [More]
Sanofi, Regeneron present alirocumab Phase 3 trial results at ESC Congress 2014

Sanofi, Regeneron present alirocumab Phase 3 trial results at ESC Congress 2014

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that details from four pivotal trials in the alirocumab ODYSSEY clinical program will be presented on Sunday, August 31, during a Hot Line session at ESC Congress 2014 in Barcelona, Spain, the world's largest cardiology meeting. [More]
Dietary compliance can be evaluated from blood sample

Dietary compliance can be evaluated from blood sample

New results from the Nordic SYSDIET study show that it's possible to assess dietary compliance from a blood sample. This is especially useful in controlled dietary intervention studies investigating the health benefits of specific diets. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

It's time to question the common belief that patients receiving intensive blood pressure treatment are prone to falling and breaking bones. A comprehensive study in people ages 40 to 79 with diabetes, led by Karen Margolis, MD, of HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in the US, found no evidence supporting this belief. [More]
Diet reduces inflammatory markers in ‘real world’ Type 2 diabetes

Diet reduces inflammatory markers in ‘real world’ Type 2 diabetes

Encouraging patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes to diet or to diet and increase their physical activity reduces markers of inflammation and their cardiovascular risk compared with usual care, real-world study findings show. [More]
Research: Oxidative stress predicts hip fracture in postmenopausal women

Research: Oxidative stress predicts hip fracture in postmenopausal women

Oxidative stress is a significant predictor for hip fracture in postmenopausal women, according to new research led by University of Cincinnati (UC) epidemiologists. [More]
Almonds can help reduce inflammation in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Almonds can help reduce inflammation in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Evidence continues to mount supporting the role of almonds and other tree nuts as part of an overall dietary pattern that is beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes. Three new studies suggest a relationship between regular consumption of tree nuts, such as almonds, and improvement in various markers of health in type 2 diabetes. [More]
Researchers create synthetic ion transporter that triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

Researchers create synthetic ion transporter that triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

Researchers from the University of Southampton are part of an international team that has helped to create a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by carrying sodium and chloride ions into the cells. [More]
Researchers create synthetic molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct

Researchers create synthetic molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. [More]