Malnutrition News and Research RSS Feed - Malnutrition News and Research

Malnutrition is a condition which occurs when there is a deficiency of certain vital nutrients in a person’s diet. The deficiency fails to meet the demands of the body leading to effects on the growth, physical health, mood, behaviour and other functions of the body. Malnutrition commonly affects children and the elderly.
Maternal health key to healthier nation

Maternal health key to healthier nation

Investing in the health of expectant mothers is crucial in helping to create a healthier nation, according to a health expert at Sheffield Hallam University. [More]
Survey shows "significant gap" in detection of nutrition problems in hospitalized patients

Survey shows "significant gap" in detection of nutrition problems in hospitalized patients

A new survey of Canadian physicians shows a "significant gap" between optimal practices to detect nutrition problems in hospitalized patients and what action is actually taking place. [More]
Global food security depends on climate change and agricultural productivity

Global food security depends on climate change and agricultural productivity

Global malnutrition could fall 84 percent by the year 2050 as incomes in developing countries grow - but only if agricultural productivity continues to improve and climate change does not severely damage agriculture, Purdue University researchers say. [More]
Study reveals high demand for costly cancer treatment among refugees from Iraq, Syria

Study reveals high demand for costly cancer treatment among refugees from Iraq, Syria

A study published in The Lancet Oncology journal reveals a high demand for costly cancer treatment among refugees from the recent conflicts in Iraq and Syria, with host countries struggling to find the money and the medicine to treat their new patients. [More]
Salk scientists explore earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia

Salk scientists explore earliest detectable changes in the brain that lead to schizophrenia

Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early. [More]
Hospital patients now see improved quality of nutrition health care by CMS’ new rule

Hospital patients now see improved quality of nutrition health care by CMS’ new rule

Hospital patients may now see improved quality and timeliness of nutrition health care and hospitals will save hundreds of millions of dollars annually because of a new rule issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Freeman Health System wins 2014 Truven Health Advantage Award for Overall Performance

Freeman Health System wins 2014 Truven Health Advantage Award for Overall Performance

Mike Boswood, president and CEO of Truven Health Analytics presented the 2014 Truven Health Advantage Award for Overall Performance to Freeman Health System, a not-for-profit, three-hospital system in Joplin, Missouri. [More]
Study: Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 threaten human nutrition

Study: Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 threaten human nutrition

At the elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 anticipated by around 2050, crops that provide a large share of the global population with most of their dietary zinc and iron will have significantly reduced concentrations of those nutrients, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). [More]
Rat pups exposed to tobacco smoke are at higher risk of developing metabolic disease

Rat pups exposed to tobacco smoke are at higher risk of developing metabolic disease

While many parents-to-be are aware that the health of their baby starts before they've actually arrived into the world, recent research reveals that "harm" (i.e., tobacco smoke, dirty air, poor nutrition, even preeclampsia) may not present itself disease-wise until well into adulthood or when a second harmful "hit" triggers the individual's susceptibility. [More]
Researchers find links between hospital readmission rates and social factors

Researchers find links between hospital readmission rates and social factors

Factors like the level of poverty in a neighborhood, living alone, and age affect a patient's chances of being readmitted to a hospital after discharge, even after possible variations in quality of care in the hospital have been taken into account. [More]
Highlights from April 2014 issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Highlights from April 2014 issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Here are highlights from the April issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. [More]
Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored from birth to reveal the first signs of cognitive dysfunction, using a new technique piloted by a London-based university collaboration. [More]
Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. [More]
New York Academy of Sciences joins with Wageningen University to direct collaborative nutrition research

New York Academy of Sciences joins with Wageningen University to direct collaborative nutrition research

New York Academy of Sciences joins with Wageningen University to direct collaborative nutrition research across industries, academia, and funders. [More]
Discovery could lead to new therapies for people with celiac disease

Discovery could lead to new therapies for people with celiac disease

Researchers at McMaster University have discovered a key molecule that could lead to new therapies for people with celiac disease, an often painful and currently untreatable autoimmune disorder. [More]
GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced three grants worth a total of US$6.8 million to speed the development of innovative drugs for some of the world’s most neglected diseases—schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and parasitic roundworms. [More]
Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

The control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is one of the most cost-effective ways Indonesia can sustain economic growth and reduce inequality, said scientists today in an analysis published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]
The Alliance to End Hunger, Promedica to host summit on hunger and health

The Alliance to End Hunger, Promedica to host summit on hunger and health

ProMedica, a nonprofit healthcare organization serving northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan, is partnering with the Alliance to End Hunger to host Come to the Table, a summit in Washington, D.C., to broaden the dialogue nationally about addressing hunger as a health issue. [More]
New study explores the effect of food insecurity on treating HIV-infected pregnant women in Uganda

New study explores the effect of food insecurity on treating HIV-infected pregnant women in Uganda

In Uganda the prescription of three antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, which aim to suppress the virus to prevent disease progression, have resulted in huge reductions in HIV mortality rates. However, disease is not the only scourge in Uganda, and a new study in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology explores the impact food insecurity may have on treating pregnant women. [More]
Sarcopenia increases risk of sepsis risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation

Sarcopenia increases risk of sepsis risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation

Japanese researchers have determined that sarcopenia—a loss of skeletal muscle mass—increases risk of sepsis and mortality risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation. [More]