Malnutrition News and Research RSS Feed - Malnutrition News and Research

Malnutrition is a condition which occurs when there is a deficiency of certain vital nutrients in a person’s diet. The deficiency fails to meet the demands of the body leading to effects on the growth, physical health, mood, behaviour and other functions of the body. Malnutrition commonly affects children and the elderly.
Identification of elder abuse and neglect very crucial in emergency department

Identification of elder abuse and neglect very crucial in emergency department

When older adults in severely debilitated states show up for treatment in the emergency department, emergency physicians and staff must be able to identify and document their symptoms and decide whether to report their concerns to adult protective services. [More]
Parasitic flatworm rejuvenates its skin to survive in human bloodstream

Parasitic flatworm rejuvenates its skin to survive in human bloodstream

A parasitic flatworm that infects hundreds of millions of people in the developing world is able to survive in the bloodstream for decades by constantly renewing its skin - a mechanism that could inform potential new treatments against infection. [More]
New article explores effect of frailty on natural history of diabetes

New article explores effect of frailty on natural history of diabetes

Future Science Group today announced the publication of a new article in Future Science OA, reporting data that explore the effect of frailty on the natural history of diabetes and the implications it will have for therapeutic plans in older people. [More]
New project aims to encourage sustainable food practices

New project aims to encourage sustainable food practices

The issue of global food security is a problem for us now, and for future generations. Perhaps the most visible issue is malnutrition, which affects millions in the developing world and poses a risk to many vulnerable people in the developed world. [More]
HIV-positive individuals in Africa with certain genetic variant have lower chance of developing TB

HIV-positive individuals in Africa with certain genetic variant have lower chance of developing TB

In the first known discovery of its kind, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team has found that HIV patients in Africa with a certain genetic variant have a 63-percent lower chance of developing tuberculosis than HIV patients without the genetic variant. [More]
Global climate crisis threatens public health

Global climate crisis threatens public health

In a review published in the Annals of Global Health, doctors warn of the impending public health crisis brought on by climate change and call for action to help prepare the world for what is ahead. [More]
Food-based proteins can help address child malnutrition in developing countries

Food-based proteins can help address child malnutrition in developing countries

Contrary to popular belief among world relief workers, children in developing countries may not be eating enough protein, which could contribute to stunted growth, a Johns Hopkins-directed study suggests. [More]
Inadequate dietary intake of essential amino acids and nutrient choline linked to stunting

Inadequate dietary intake of essential amino acids and nutrient choline linked to stunting

Worldwide, an estimated 25 percent of children under age 5 suffer from stunted growth and development. The most visible characteristic is short stature, but the effects of stunting are far more profound: The condition prevents children from reaching their cognitive potential; makes them more susceptible to illness and infection; and shortens their life spans. [More]
Excessive growth of bacteria in small intestine could lead to stunting in young children

Excessive growth of bacteria in small intestine could lead to stunting in young children

Excessive growth of bacteria in the small intestine could be damaging the guts of young children, leading to stunting, scientists from the U.S. and Bangladesh have discovered. [More]
Health expert calls for stronger measures to address prevalence of stunting among infants, children

Health expert calls for stronger measures to address prevalence of stunting among infants, children

Mother and child malnutrition in low- and middle-income countries encompasses a range of conditions including maternal wasting, micronutrient deficiencies, foetal growth restriction and stunting - a height that is below the World Health Organization Child Growth Standards median - of children younger than five years. [More]
Household and outdoor air pollution kills more than 5.5 million people every year

Household and outdoor air pollution kills more than 5.5 million people every year

New research shows that more than 5.5 million people die prematurely every year due to household and outdoor air pollution. More than half of deaths occur in two of the world's fastest growing economies, China and India. [More]
Food supplementation can be effective in alleviating malnutrition in resource-limited settings

Food supplementation can be effective in alleviating malnutrition in resource-limited settings

In 2 articles published this week in PLOS Medicine, Saskia van der Kam of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and colleagues describe the outcomes of two randomised controlled trials in resource-limited settings to determine if the vicious cycle between childhood illness and malnutrition could be broken with a brief period of food supplementation during recovery from illness. [More]
UM SOM researchers reveal genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli

UM SOM researchers reveal genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli

A multi-disciplinary group of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have for the first time determined the genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli, which every year kills hundreds of thousands of people around the world. [More]
Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women who come to Canada have greater risk of giving birth prematurely than non-refugee immigrants, a study by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher has found. Those risks are fueled by the fact that the preterm birth rate was 7.1 per cent among secondary refugees - those who spent more than six months in a transit country before arriving in Canada -compared to five per cent among secondary, non-refugee immigrants. [More]
UNICEF launches US $2.8 billion appeal to meet the needs of children in crisis

UNICEF launches US $2.8 billion appeal to meet the needs of children in crisis

In the Pacific Islands, many children don’t have enough safe water to drink and their education has been interrupted as result of the severe, ongoing El Niño. [More]
NBA, FrieslandCampina extend marketing partnership

NBA, FrieslandCampina extend marketing partnership

The National Basketball Association and Royal FrieslandCampina -- one of the world's largest dairy companies, providing millions of children and families with valuable nutrition every day -- announced today a multi-year extension of their marketing partnership. [More]
Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Results from a new clinical trial show that a specialized oral nutrition supplement was associated with a 50 percent lower death rate in older malnourished patients with a heart or lung disease 90 days following hospitalization. [More]
Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

When the Ebola virus outbreak erupted in West Africa in 2014, children infected with the virus -- particularly those under age 5 -- faced overwhelming challenges. Not only was there a high death rate among young children infected with the disease, they often were isolated from their families, leaving them feeling distressed and without the intensive care they needed. [More]
New research sheds light on how gut damage can cause malnutrition, oral vaccine failure

New research sheds light on how gut damage can cause malnutrition, oral vaccine failure

It has been estimated that if every nutritional measure known to be helpful were applied to every child in the world, global malnutrition would be decreased by only a third. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, the University of Vermont and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Bangladesh sheds light on why: Damage to the gut from infection explains why food alone is not a solution to malnutrition. [More]
NIH-led collaboration details research strategy to address brain disorders

NIH-led collaboration details research strategy to address brain disorders

Infants are starved of oxygen during difficult births. Children's cognitive function is permanently damaged due to malnutrition or exposure to infections or toxins. Adults suffer from crippling depression or dementia. The breadth and complexity of these and other brain and nervous system disorders make them some of the most difficult conditions to diagnose and treat, especially in the developing world, where there are few resources. [More]
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