Malnutrition News and Research RSS Feed - Malnutrition News and Research

Malnutrition is a condition which occurs when there is a deficiency of certain vital nutrients in a person’s diet. The deficiency fails to meet the demands of the body leading to effects on the growth, physical health, mood, behaviour and other functions of the body. Malnutrition commonly affects children and the elderly.
Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored from birth to reveal the first signs of cognitive dysfunction, using a new technique piloted by a London-based university collaboration. [More]
Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. [More]
New York Academy of Sciences joins with Wageningen University to direct collaborative nutrition research

New York Academy of Sciences joins with Wageningen University to direct collaborative nutrition research

New York Academy of Sciences joins with Wageningen University to direct collaborative nutrition research across industries, academia, and funders. [More]
Discovery could lead to new therapies for people with celiac disease

Discovery could lead to new therapies for people with celiac disease

Researchers at McMaster University have discovered a key molecule that could lead to new therapies for people with celiac disease, an often painful and currently untreatable autoimmune disorder. [More]
GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced three grants worth a total of US$6.8 million to speed the development of innovative drugs for some of the world’s most neglected diseases—schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and parasitic roundworms. [More]
Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

The control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is one of the most cost-effective ways Indonesia can sustain economic growth and reduce inequality, said scientists today in an analysis published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]
The Alliance to End Hunger, Promedica to host summit on hunger and health

The Alliance to End Hunger, Promedica to host summit on hunger and health

ProMedica, a nonprofit healthcare organization serving northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan, is partnering with the Alliance to End Hunger to host Come to the Table, a summit in Washington, D.C., to broaden the dialogue nationally about addressing hunger as a health issue. [More]
New study explores the effect of food insecurity on treating HIV-infected pregnant women in Uganda

New study explores the effect of food insecurity on treating HIV-infected pregnant women in Uganda

In Uganda the prescription of three antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, which aim to suppress the virus to prevent disease progression, have resulted in huge reductions in HIV mortality rates. However, disease is not the only scourge in Uganda, and a new study in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology explores the impact food insecurity may have on treating pregnant women. [More]
Sarcopenia increases risk of sepsis risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation

Sarcopenia increases risk of sepsis risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation

Japanese researchers have determined that sarcopenia—a loss of skeletal muscle mass—increases risk of sepsis and mortality risk in patients undergoing live donor liver transplantation. [More]
Researchers discover how beneficial bacteria in guts communicate with own cells

Researchers discover how beneficial bacteria in guts communicate with own cells

Communication is vital to any successful relationship. Researchers from the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia have discovered how the beneficial bacteria in our guts communicate with our own cells. [More]
Mallinckrodt's subsidiary to acquire all outstanding shares of Cadence Pharmaceuticals

Mallinckrodt's subsidiary to acquire all outstanding shares of Cadence Pharmaceuticals

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceuticals company, and Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which a subsidiary of Mallinckrodt plc will commence a tender offer to acquire all outstanding shares of Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc. for $14.00 per share in cash or approximately $1.3 billion on a fully diluted basis, which represents a 32% premium to the trailing 30-trading-day volume weighted average price (VWAP) of $10.62 per share for Cadence Pharmaceuticals, Inc. [More]
Study: Investigational drug effective in reducing mucormycosis infections

Study: Investigational drug effective in reducing mucormycosis infections

With very few treatment options available to fight deadly mucormycosis infections, a new Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) study holds hope for adding to the arsenal of therapies physicians have to combat an increasingly common infection afflicting people with weakened immune systems. [More]

New book encourages critical thinking and effective action for future of global agrifood system

Carbon dioxide emissions from transportation, energy generation and built infrastructure may be major contributors to climate change, but they may not be the biggest ones. According to UC Santa Barbara environmental science professor David A. Cleveland, that dubious distinction could go to the agrifood system. [More]

Study: Rise of tuberculosis in Zimbabwe linked with widespread food shortage

The rise of tuberculosis (TB) in Zimbabwe during the socio-economic crisis of 2008-9 has been linked to widespread food shortage, according to a new study led by Canadian researchers from the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health published in PLOS ONE. [More]
WHO delivers over 125 tons of medical equipment, medicines to health providers in Aleppo

WHO delivers over 125 tons of medical equipment, medicines to health providers in Aleppo

Over the past 2 weeks WHO delivered 2 shipments with more than 125 tons of medical equipment and medicines to health providers in Aleppo, Syrian Arab Republic - in both government-controlled and in opposition-controlled areas. All shipments contained surgical materials, medicines to treat chronic and infectious diseases, infant incubators, ventilators and intensive care unit beds. [More]
NPSP to conduct open-label study to evaluate teduglutide in pediatric patients with SBS

NPSP to conduct open-label study to evaluate teduglutide in pediatric patients with SBS

NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: NPSP), a global biopharmaceutical company pioneering and delivering therapies that transform the lives of patients with rare diseases worldwide, today announced that the company has initiated a global registration study of teduglutide in pediatric patients with Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) who are dependent on parenteral support. [More]
Research finding could lead to development of vaccine and therapies for mucormycosis

Research finding could lead to development of vaccine and therapies for mucormycosis

Mucormycosis is a deadly infection that strikes people with weakened immune systems when certain types of fungi, called Mucorales, invade the patients' cells. A novel protein on the surface of the Mucorales cells, called CotH, makes this invasion possible. [More]
Atara Biotherapeutics secures $38.5M in initial closings under Series B financing

Atara Biotherapeutics secures $38.5M in initial closings under Series B financing

Atara Biotherapeutics, Inc., a drug development company with a focus on innovative therapies for patients with debilitating diseases, announced today that it has secured $38.5 million in initial closings under its Series B financing. In this round, investors Amgen Ventures, Celgene Corporation, and EcoR1 Capital, joined existing investors Alexandria Venture Investments, DAG Ventures, Domain Associates, and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. [More]
Probiotics could be next potential weapon to fight malnutrition

Probiotics could be next potential weapon to fight malnutrition

The University of British Columbia public affairs office has published today a story on probiotic intervention as the next potential weapon against malnutrition. [More]
EMA expands administration options for Hizentra

EMA expands administration options for Hizentra

CSL Behring UK Ltd announced today that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has expanded the administration options for Hizentra®▼, human normal immunoglobulin, SCIg, 20% liquid, to include dosing once every two weeks (fortnightly). [More]