Medicaid News and Research RSS Feed - Medicaid News and Research

Medicaid is the United States health program for eligible individuals and families with low incomes and resources. It is a means-tested program that is jointly funded by the states and federal government, and is managed by the states.
Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Researchers call for improved cause-of-death reporting to advance understanding of epilepsy

Recent studies conclude that people with epilepsy have a 27-fold greater risk of sudden death than people without the disorder. However, many of these deaths could be prevented through greater identification of epilepsy as a cause of death, and in educating the public more effectively about the disease's life-threatening dangers. [More]
NITOS coding platform allows users to examine role and value of medical imaging

NITOS coding platform allows users to examine role and value of medical imaging

A new free resource allows researchers to use Medicare and other payer claims databases to identify and meaningfully characterize medical imaging by noninvasive or invasive procedures, modality, body region and clinical focus. Developed by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, the Neiman Imaging Types of Service (NITOS) coding platform is an open source classification system, allowing users to readily extract utilization and cost data to examine the role and value of medical imaging. [More]
Stanford study finds that overprescription of opioids goes beyond ‘pill mill’ prescribers

Stanford study finds that overprescription of opioids goes beyond ‘pill mill’ prescribers

Most prescriptions for opioid painkillers are made by the broad swath of U.S. general practitioners, not by a limited group of specialists, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
VistaPharm announces launch of Potassium Chloride Solution

VistaPharm announces launch of Potassium Chloride Solution

VistaPharm today announced that it has launched Potassium Chloride Solution, USP, 10% in Unit Dose. The product is supplied to the market in a 50 count case of 30mL unit dose cups. [More]
Johns Hopkins-led study shows disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

Johns Hopkins-led study shows disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers shows wide racial and economic disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for early uterine cancer in the United States. This is despite years of accumulating evidence that the procedures to remove the uterus are linked to fewer postoperative complications, the researchers say. [More]
Study: Spanish-speaking Hispanic women less likely to use neuraxial analgesia during labor

Study: Spanish-speaking Hispanic women less likely to use neuraxial analgesia during labor

Why do Hispanic women have reduced rates of epidural or spinal (neuraxial) analgesia during labor? Language barriers may be a key factor, according to a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Children with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida at increased risk for abuse

Children with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida at increased risk for abuse

Children born with cleft lip or palate and spina bifida are at an increased risk for abuse before the age of 2, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Postponing chemotherapy may increase risk of death for triple-negative breast cancer patients

Postponing chemotherapy may increase risk of death for triple-negative breast cancer patients

Postponing the start of adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 90 days following surgery may significantly increase risk of death for breast cancer patients, particularly those with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
New study finds relationship between socioeconomic factors and distribution of anesthesia providers

New study finds relationship between socioeconomic factors and distribution of anesthesia providers

A new study suggests that Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) are the main anesthesia professionals ensuring patient access to critical anesthesia care in lower-income areas where the populations are more likely to be uninsured, unemployed and/or Medicaid eligible. [More]
New study shows wide disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

New study shows wide disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for uterine cancer

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers shows wide racial and economic disparities in access to minimally invasive hysterectomies for early uterine cancer in the United States. This is despite years of accumulating evidence that the procedures to remove the uterus are linked to fewer postoperative complications, the researchers say. [More]
Specific unmet socioeconomic needs can hamper quality of care patients receive, MGH study finds

Specific unmet socioeconomic needs can hamper quality of care patients receive, MGH study finds

A study of patients seen at two primary care practices at Massachusetts General Hospital has identified specific unmet socioeconomic needs that can interfere with the quality of care patients receive. [More]
Economic and racial barriers impact treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

Economic and racial barriers impact treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis

In the first known study to examine the prevalence and treatment of psoriasis in older Americans, experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found that black patients receiving Medicare are less likely to receive biologic therapies -medications derived from human or animal cells or tissues - for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis than white patients. [More]
People exiting prison or jail get access to health services

People exiting prison or jail get access to health services

With the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, an entire new population is eligible for government health care: low-income men. [More]
Age doesn't matter when considering HCT for patients with MDS, study reveals

Age doesn't matter when considering HCT for patients with MDS, study reveals

Results from a prospective study of 1,280 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) showed that survival at 100 days and at two years following hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) for patients aged 65 and older is comparable to patients aged 55 to 64. [More]
Study: Medicaid expansion increases use of breast cancer screening among low-income women

Study: Medicaid expansion increases use of breast cancer screening among low-income women

Low-income women in Medicaid expansion states in the U.S. are more likely to have a breast screening performed than those in non-expansion states, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Meridian Health Plan wins 2015 Top Workplaces award

Meridian Health Plan wins 2015 Top Workplaces award

Meridian Health Plan has been awarded a 2015 Top Workplaces honor by the Detroit Free Press. The Top Workplaces lists are based solely on the results of an employee feedback survey administered by WorkplaceDynamics, LLC, a leading research firm that specializes in organizational health and workplace improvement. [More]
Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

A new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that while most U.S. health insurance plans deny benefits to transgender men and women for medical care necessary to transition to the opposite sex, paying for sex reassignment surgery and hormones is actually cost-effective. [More]
Early childhood Medicaid exposure linked to adult health outcomes

Early childhood Medicaid exposure linked to adult health outcomes

Expanding publicly funded health insurance to low-income children could have long-term benefits for adult health, according to new research from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. Published in the Journal of Health Economics, the study found that exposure to Medicaid in early childhood, from conception through age 5, is associated with significant improvements in adult health (age 25 to 54). [More]
Complex numeric data on hospital-acquired infections confuses consumers

Complex numeric data on hospital-acquired infections confuses consumers

Patients have difficulty deciphering complex numeric data on healthcare-associated infections used by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to help consumers choose hospitals, according to a new study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). [More]
New UMD study explores why African American and Hispanic women have high rates of unintended pregnancy

New UMD study explores why African American and Hispanic women have high rates of unintended pregnancy

A new study from the University of Maryland School of Public Health examined why African American and Hispanic women have higher rates of unintended pregnancy than White women. Researchers found that there were unique factors explaining the differences in unintended pregnancy between African Americans and Whites (respondent's mother's age at first birth, income, and health insurance status) and the differences between Hispanics and Whites (U.S. born status and educational level). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement