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Study shows endoscopist knowledge of positive Cologuard result may enhance colonoscopy quality

Study shows endoscopist knowledge of positive Cologuard result may enhance colonoscopy quality

An endoscopist's knowledge of a positive Cologuard test improves colonoscopy performance, according to a poster presentation at last week's Digestive Disease Week conference. [More]
Innovative research technique may help understand early stage kidney disease

Innovative research technique may help understand early stage kidney disease

UT Dallas scientists are developing an innovative research technique that could help urologists better understand the early stages of kidney disease. [More]
Antihypertensive initiation, intensification linked to raised short-term fall risk

Antihypertensive initiation, intensification linked to raised short-term fall risk

Older patients initiating or intensifying antihypertensive medication have a short-term increased risk of sustaining a serious fall injury, US study findings indicate. [More]
Rural hospitals may work well for straightforward surgeries in relatively healthy patients

Rural hospitals may work well for straightforward surgeries in relatively healthy patients

They may be in small towns. They may only have a couple of surgeons. But for common operations, they may be safer and less expensive than their larger cousins, a new study finds. [More]
Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Esophagectomy is a major surgical procedure associated with significant complications with up to 1 in 5 patients readmitted following hospital discharge. These unplanned readmissions are an important problem as they negatively impact patient care and, in the future, may have implications for reimbursement through the Hospital Readmissions Reduction program. [More]
People in low-income communities more likely to be hospitalized for AMI

People in low-income communities more likely to be hospitalized for AMI

While heart attack rates across all income levels have declined significantly over the last 15 years, people living in low-income communities are still more likely to be hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a new study published by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the journal JAMA Cardiology. [More]
Becker's Hospital Review names UC San Diego Health among '100 Great Hospitals in America'

Becker's Hospital Review names UC San Diego Health among '100 Great Hospitals in America'

UC San Diego Health has been named by Becker's Hospital Review to its 2016 list of "100 Great Hospitals in America." The list is based on rankings and awards from reputable sources, such as Healthgrades, The Leapfrog Group, and U.S. News & World Report. [More]
Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

A new study indicates that cancer may have negative impacts on both the physical and mental health of individuals as they age. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that cancer increases the risk for certain health issues above and beyond normal aging. This is likely due, in part, to decreased physical activity and stress associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Medicare policy puts low-income Americans at increased risk for colorectal cancer

Medicare policy puts low-income Americans at increased risk for colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the second highest cause of cancer death in the United States, expected to claim the lives of an estimated 49,190 people in 2016. The Affordable Care Act aimed to increase access to CRC screening by not holding patients responsible for all costs of the procedure, yet current Medicare insurance beneficiaries lacking supplemental insurance may not be able to afford colon cancer screening and treatment. [More]
Physicians come together for single-payer national health insurance reform

Physicians come together for single-payer national health insurance reform

In a dramatic show of physician support for deeper health reform - and for making a decisive break with the private insurance model of financing medical care - 2,231 physicians called today [Thursday, May 5] for the creation of a publicly financed, single-payer national health program that would cover all Americans for all medically necessary care. [More]
Guide to advance directives: an interview with Dr Lisa Price

Guide to advance directives: an interview with Dr Lisa Price

An advance directive is a very specific legal document that details the medical treatments you want, and, importantly, don’t want, if you’re unable to communicate with a physician. This may happen as a result of a critical illness that could make you confused or unable to speak. [More]
Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Patients aged 65 years and older are living longer after lung cancer surgery, and with older people representing a rapidly growing proportion of patients diagnosed with lung cancer, this improved survival is especially significant, according to an article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
High prevalence of depression alongside COPD can impact overall health, treatment effectiveness

High prevalence of depression alongside COPD can impact overall health, treatment effectiveness

Although there have been discussions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition impacting 24 million Americans, and depression, there has been little research showing the impact depression has on patients with COPD. Two studies published in the April issue of the journal CHEST found one in four patients with COPD suffer from depressive symptoms, and if not treated, those symptoms can have a negative effect on their overall health and treatment effectiveness. [More]
Self-reported care delays linked to long waiting times in VA health coverage system

Self-reported care delays linked to long waiting times in VA health coverage system

Military veterans are more likely to report delays in seeking necessary healthcare, compared to the US general population, reports a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Influence of psychiatric comorbidities on all-cause readmissions following elective spine surgery

Influence of psychiatric comorbidities on all-cause readmissions following elective spine surgery

Winner of the Robert Florin Resident Award, Owoicho Adogwa, MD, presented his research, Association Between Baseline Affective Disorders and 30-day Readmission Rates in Patients Undergoing Elective Spine Surgery, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
New oral cancer drugs getting more expensive over time, study shows

New oral cancer drugs getting more expensive over time, study shows

New cancer drugs taken in pill form have become dramatically more expensive in their first year on the market compared with drugs launched 15 years ago, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study has found. The findings call into question the sustainability of a system that sets high prices at market entry in addition to rapidly increasing those prices over time. [More]
Increasing number of sickest liver transplant candidates delisted from wait list, study finds

Increasing number of sickest liver transplant candidates delisted from wait list, study finds

The sickest liver transplant candidates should be first in line when a donor liver becomes available, but transplant centers are increasingly removing these individuals from the waiting list, considering them "too sick to transplant," an analysis of nationwide transplant data finds. The study appears online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website in advance of print publication. [More]
Nurse scientist asks health-care systems to set patients up for mortality cliff

Nurse scientist asks health-care systems to set patients up for mortality cliff

Longer lifespans, due to advances in medicine and public health, mean people are living longer with multiple chronic conditions. [More]
New study explores factors that affect Medicare patient’s adherence to psoriasis biologic therapies

New study explores factors that affect Medicare patient’s adherence to psoriasis biologic therapies

About half of Medicare patients who start taking biologic therapies for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis stop within a year, according to a new study led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Higher levels of neighborhood greenness linked to lower chronic disease risk

Higher levels of neighborhood greenness linked to lower chronic disease risk

A new study of a quarter-million Miami-Dade County Medicare beneficiaries showed that higher levels of neighborhood greenness, including trees, grass and other vegetation, were linked to a significant reduction in the rate of chronic illnesses, particularly in low-to-middle income neighborhoods. [More]
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